Thursday, 26 January 2023

The British Times Lists Their Favourite Croatian Hidden Gems

January 26, 2023 - Foreign media loves Croatia indeed. And not only during or just before the tourist season, either. They're starting to discover it sooner and talking about it more than ever before. It's only the start of the year, and though it is mainly a summer destination, there are articles already popping up left and right about the beauties of one of Europe's most recent tourist hits. The British Times calls it Secret Croatia, and goes on to list their favourite Croatian hidden gems.

This time around, the Biritish Times dug deeper and decided to praise the hidden spots of our beloved land of wonder. They speak of paths undiscovered, waters unswam, and food uneaten. Granted, no mention of eastern Croatia, but we’ll be patient and they might just take us seriously when we say it’s a place like no other.

In the meantime, let us also give praise where praise is due. Deeming the country’s former currency, the kuna, as... obscure, the Times sees the introduction of the euro as one of the things that will further boost tourism in Croatia in 2023. And with most visitors concentrating in and around the hotspots such as Dubrovnik, Hvar and Rovinj, they set out to find alternative routes and hidden gems. And so they did.

First off, the fishing village of Vrsar in Istria is presented as a place with which even the legendary lover Casanova fell in love, going back twice and saving it for eternity in his memoirs. Vrsar is a typical little Istrian village of cobbled streets, old churches, and the most charming of chilling spots overlooking the nearby islands. Go there for dolphin spotting, seafood eating, kayaking and paddleboarding, or just life living.

Second on their list, Rastoke, inspires one of those mixed feelings in me, as a local. I almost selfishly wish they haven't listed it. Rastoke, in my humble opinion, is one of the most magical little places in Croatia. It is a small village nestled on the banks of the Korana River, whose source is at Rastoke’s big sister, the Plitvice Lakes. Though absolutely stunning and deserving of every praise, the popularity and therefore, crowdedness of the Plitvice Lakes national park is exactly what might inspire visitors to pivot towards Rastoke. The river creates over 30 waterfalls, making it perfect for adrenaline lovers, and the walking trails of its banks are ideal for a relaxed time in nature. And an abundance of places where you can enjoy trout directly from the river always comes in handy.

Eastern Mljet found itself on the list for its sandy beaches and the famous Odysseus cave. Though the part of the island with the national park receives plenty of visitors, its eastern side is unfairly neglected. If you’re looking for the full spectrum of blues and green to soothe your soul, though, this is the place to go. The pines provide the perfect shade to balance out the sunny moment in eastern Mljet’s beautiful bays.

As further spots to find perfect privacy, Times brings up Drvenik Veli and Drvenik Mali. The big brother, Drvenik Veli, for its Blue Lagoon, and Drvenik Mali for the Vela Rina sandy beach. Both live a wonderfully laid-back, perfectly relaxed lifestyle ideal for a getaway.

Lastly, the Times regards Korčula’s main town almost as the second Dubrovnik, which has no trouble attracting the same crowds of visitors as the southern capital of Croatian tourism. Lumbarda, however, is the antidote, and it’s right there. This lively little village offers beautiful beaches and an island lifestyle with long summer nights. Its main attraction, as the Times emphasizes, is the wine scene with the grk and plavac mali varieties.

Hats off to the Times; they found a few truly stunning Croatian hidden gems.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated Travel section.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, 25 January 2023

Croatian Regions Locals Love the Most and Where They go for Food

January 25, 2023 - A survey was carried out to gain insight into the extent to which specific Croatian regions spark curiosity and desire of the local population to visit, what images are associated with which region, and at what time of the year which region is the most attractive.

Dalmatia, Istria, Lika, and Gorski Kotar are the Croatian regions most attractive for domestic tourists, with Slavonia following in the fourth place, while Zagreb is the urban centre that offers the most opportunities for shopping, culture, and entertainment.

At the same time, writes Poslovni, Istria did the best when it came to gastronomy and a longer tourist season, which is where Dalmatia and other destinations have enormous room for improvement. This was found in a survey conducted at the end of last year by the Improve agency in cooperation with BlueRock Consulting.

In the recently adopted Croatian tourism strategy until 2030, year-round and more regionally balanced tourism is set as one of the strategic goals, and it is thought that the unique tourist identity of certain regions should be developed, that is, the umbrella brand that connects tourist destinations. Accordingly, target groups of guests should be clearly defined, explains BRC.

The leaders

"The results show that the key brands are the tourist regions themselves, and there is no dilemma about the name of a particular tourist region either. Short and clear names were adopted, and regions were recognized as such. This is great for these tourist destinations and their further communication and the development of tourist products. It is great that Lika and Gorski Kotar are already almost as attractive to domestic tourists as developed coastal regions. Preservation of natural beauty is essential, but how much the other reasons for coming are lagging shows how wide the room for improvement is," emphasizes Emanuel Tutek, a partner in BRC.

For Dalmatia, natural beauty is a far more important asset than cultural heritage and gastronomy. Admittedly, in comparison to Istria, entertainment facilities are somewhat more attractive in Dalmatia, while quality and attractive private accommodation is the slightly less attractive factor. In addition to peace and relaxation (79%), the most common associations of those who chose Dalmatia are fun and joy, more than other regions except Zagreb.

Istria is perfectly positioned as a gastronomic destination, rich in culture and natural beauty, and guests associate it with comfort and romance. The authors note that Istria most successfully promoted the breadth of its offer, as those who chose that region to cite relatively more different motivating factors.

The most common are natural beauties (80%), followed by gastronomy (62%) and culture (heritage or events, 56%). Quality and attractive private accommodation is the fourth most common factor. However, recreational or sports activities are rarely mentioned as the motivation for visiting Istria.

New discoveries

Among those who are attracted to this region, the top associations are peace and relaxation. More than other regions, it attracts people with higher household incomes and higher education as well. For Lika and Gorski Kotar, natural beauty and peace, and relaxation are the leading reasons for visiting, but the region stands out by associations with health and opportunities for recreational, sports, and adrenaline activities.

Associations that stand out more than in other regions are health, adventure, and adrenaline, but also peace and relaxation and "new discoveries." In Slavonia, besides natural beauty, there is a very strong motivation for choosing gastronomy (61%), and it is just as strong as in the most successful region of Istria. Cultural heritage holds the third place, while recreation and entertainment rank poorly, and quality accommodation is hardly mentioned. Slavonia attracts older people (over 55 years) more than average. Motivation for local guests to visit Zagreb includes shopping (32%), cultural heritage and events (27%), and entertainment (for adults, 24%, for children, 26%), and the top associations are entertainment and variety.

The longest season is guaranteed in Lika and Gorski Kotar, which attract guests almost all year round. The spring and less warm summer months are chosen the most for both Istria and Slavonia. For Dalmatia, the focus is on the summer months, from June to September, and very few consider the spring months to be the best time to visit Dalmatia.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated Travel section.

Wednesday, 29 June 2022

Border Controls on Land and Sea to be Revoked on 1 January, at Airports on 26 March

ZAGREB, 29 June 2022 - The Council of the EU on Wednesday proposed that controls at Croatia's land and sea borders with Schengen countries be revoked as of 1 January 2023 and at airports as of 26 March.

The reasons for the different date for air traffic controls are of a technical nature.

At airports in Schengen countries, it is necessary to change the gates for aircraft arriving and departing from Croatia in order to separate passengers and direct them to exits without border controls. The same needs to be done at Croatian airports.

"The date for the lifting of controls at the air borders has to coincide in practice with the dates of IATA summer/winter time schedule, i.e. either the last Sunday of March or the last Sunday of October," the EU said in its Draft Council Decision on the full application of the provisions of the Schengen acquis in Croatia, published on its website.

The Council of the EU sent the draft decision to the European Parliament with a letter to Parliament President Roberta Metsola asking for the Parliament's opinion as soon as possible.

The draft decision also suggests that all restrictions on the use of the Schengen Information System by Croatia shall be lifted from 1 January 2023.

The opinion of the European Parliament is not binding on the Council but constitutes a procedural step that cannot be avoided.

The decision to launch the procedure was adopted today at a meeting of the Committee of Representatives (Coreper), which consists of the ambassadors of the EU member states.

If no unforeseen obstacles emerge, Croatia would thus become a member of the Schengen Area and the euro area, the two closest organisations that form the core of the entire Union, in the tenth year of its membership in the EU.

For more on travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 15 June 2022

Croatian Air Traffic Recovers Completely, Zagreb Airport in Lead

June the 15th, 2022 - Croatian air traffic has well and truly recovered from the enormous amount of damage done to it as a result of the global coronavirus pandemic and all of the lockdowns and measures against travel for leisure that were introduced across Europe and the world.

As Poslovni Dnevnik/Darko Bicak writes, the fact that there was a complete recovery of Croatian air traffic after the global coronavirus pandemic has been very clearly shown by data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). Their information shows that in April 2022, the total passenger traffic at Croatian airports amounted to 580 thousand people, which is 654 percent more than in April 2021, when the country realised a turnover of a mere 77 thousand passengers.

The largest amount of Croatian air traffic in terms of passengers was realised by Zagreb's Franjo Tudjman International Airport, with 254 thousand passengers (an increase of 375.8 percent when compared to April 2021, which saw the transportation of 53 thousand passengers), followed by Split Airport with 132 thousand passengers and an increase of 842.1 percent when compared to April of last year (14 thousand passengers).

Dubrovnik Airport had 117 thousand passengers, which is an enormous increase compared to only eight thousand passengers in April 2021. Dubrovnik is still primarily an air destination owing the need to cross the border in and back out of neighbouring Bosnia and Herzegovina at Neum when travelling by car. The placing into function of the long awaited Peljesac bridge will likely aid that.

The most significant amount of international Croatian air traffic was realised with German airports, which transported 141 thousand passengers into Croatia, which is an increase of 650.3 percent when compared to the same period back in 2021.

The total number of aircraft landings and take-offs at all Croatian airports during April 2022 was 7,932, an increase of 126.7 percent when compared to April 2021, when the number of landings and take-offs stood at a mere 3,499.

The total cargo traffic at Croatian airports in April 2022 amounted to 728 tonnes, an encouraging increase of 14.5 percent when compared to April last year.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated travel section.

Thursday, 24 March 2022

Zagreb To Be Promoted On CA Flights To 15 Destinations

ZAGREB, 24 March 2022 - The national flag carrier Croatia Airlines (CA) and the Zagreb Tourist Board (TZGZ) will collaborate during the summer flight timetable and promote Zagreb's tourist attractions on 15 international flights, a press conference heard on Thursday.

The summer flight timetable starts on 27 March and lasts until the end of October and CA will be connected with Barcelona, Amsterdam, Athens, Vienna, Brussels, Dublin, Frankfurt, Copenhagen, London, Munich, Paris, Rome, Sarajevo, Skopje and Zurich.

The director of CA's commercial operations, Slaven Žabo, said that the summer timetable was expected to strongly contribute to developing Zagreb as a destination.

TZGZ director Martina Bienenfeld said that CA is the tourist board's strategic partner, which is logical because more than 50% of visitors to Zagreb arrive by plane while 30% come by car and the rest by other transport means.

The president of CA's management board, Jasmin Bajić, too, was pleased with the cooperation with TZGZ. Bajić expressed his gratitude for the cooperation and hope that the pandemic would be over soon.

"We hope the situation in Ukraine will not disrupt our plans. Over the past two pandemic years, CA continued to fly. We didn't stop. In 2021 we generated 70% of the 2019 turnover. This year that could be even higher because on some days during the summer we have up to 100 flights a day. Nevertheless, going back to the turnover of 2019... is not expected before the end of 2023 and before 2024," said Bajić.

He said that CA will fly with 12 planes during the 2022 summer season, the same as last year but two fewer than in 2019. Croatia will be connected with 21 international destinations with about 16,000 flights and just over 1.76 million seats.

 

Travel and destinations: For more on travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Monday, 7 March 2022

Croatia on a Shoestring: 10 Money Saving Tips for Travelers

7 March 2022 - Have rising costs from inflation put a slight dampener on your travel plans to Croatia? Fret not! We look at various ways you can enjoy a trip of a lifetime without breaking the bank featuring 10 money saving tips for travelers.

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Enjoy the best of Croatia without financial strain. (Image: Pexels)

1. Let’s start with an obvious one if you can: try to visit Croatia during the shoulder seasons, April - June for Spring and September to November for Fall. Not only do you avoid the shoulder-to-shoulder crowds, if you’re on the coast, but the sea is also still warm enough for a dip and you can still get away with a light jacket in the evenings.

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Fall is one of the best times of the year to visit. Image: (Zagreb leaves in Fall/Pexels)

On top of this, accommodation, attractions and activities are significantly cheaper. For instance, entry to Plitvice National Park is almost 50% less during shoulder seasons (300 kuna to 180 kuna). Imagine staying in a beachfront hotel with breakfast for only €55/night in November!

2. Start planning your vacation now! Early bookings ensure that you can lock in not only the best prices but also accommodations in prime locations.

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Sign up for newsletters, free memberships to access the best online deals. (Image: Pexels)

Don’t forget to use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) since prices can vary depending on where you are booking from. Using a VPN can make it look like you’re booking from another location, reducing prices further. Worth it to try and get the best online deals.

3. Be willing to mix and match flights If you’re traveling within the EU, rather than booking return tickets on the same airline, try looking for 2 one-way flights instead. I’ve scored a weekend flight for €9 one way from Lyon, France on one airline, and a return for another airline for €19.

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Tuesdays are often the cheapest days to fly. (Image: Volotea/Facebook)

If you’re visiting from outside the EU, scoring a cheap flight to Europe and then booking a secondary flight within the continent on a budget carrier is often the best way to go. Some of the airlines that frequently fly to Croatia within the EU include Volotea, Easyjet, Ryanair, TUI, Vueling, Wizzair, Eurowings, and Jet2.

4. When it comes to booking accommodation, see this article for how to get the absolute best deals. Alternatively, to lower costs further, maybe try your hand at camping at one of the many scenic spots around the country.

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Enjoy the beautiful outdoors. (Image: Pexels)

5. Instead of renting a car, use private bus transfers or if you’re feeling more adventurous and less pressed for time, trains, to get around the country.

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Zagreb's tram system is a fun way to get around. (Image: Pexels)

Companies such as Flixbus and Arriva run frequently over Summer, connecting you to major cities and attractions. Public transport within cities is also highly reliable and most Croatian cities are very walkable.

6. Keep an eye out for City Cards such as Splitcard or Zagreb card. These initiatives are run by most big cities in Croatia and are available for purchase at Tourist Information Centers or at the airport. They offer fantastic deals such as free entry to certain attractions, or huge discounts on tours, activities, shops, and even restaurants! Depending on the validity of your cards (24/48/72 hours), costs range between €10-20, which often includes free use of public transport within the city.

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Image: Visitsplit/Facebook

7. Take a ‘free’ walking tour to get a feel of local life and get to know the intricacies of the city. Often these tours are led by highly experienced locals who are able to share the rich history and culture of your chosen city.

As a bonus, they also have a wealth of insider information and will be able to advise you on the best local spots for you to keep exploring on your own. Here’s a tip for summer, always ask them where their favorite ice cream place is!

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Walking tours are also a quick way to get your bearings when in a new city. (Image: Pexels)

8. Eat like a local. Although Croatia does not offer “street food” per se, the local markets are a reasonable and equally delicious alternative. In addition to fresh produce, there are often bakeries (pekara) and small food stalls offering cold cuts, cheese, and fixings (e.g. marinated olives, peppers, pickles) to make any gastronomer a delish picnic.

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Products at the Green Market of Split. (Image: Visitsplit/Facebook)

 

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Grab fresh pastries and bread at any Pekara and pair it with a beverage for a quick and tasty meal. (Image: Pekara Dubravica/Facebook)

9. If you do head out for a meal, favor lunch over dinner. During lunch, restaurants are likely to offer specials or throw in a free drink or appetizer on occasion.

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Try to pair this meal with the local wine (stolno vino), beer (pivo), or spirits (rakija). Not only are they dangerously good, but imported brands are also 15-20% more expensive on average which can add up over time if you’re keeping an eye on your budget. Also, the tap water in Croatia is potable, which may further reduce your food spending.

10. If you don’t already have one, get a multi-currency bank account with an online bank such as Revolut or Wise. This way you’ll save on enormous ATM fees (10% in some cases) as most either offer free or lower fees up to a certain amount withdrawn. Croatia is a cash dominant country with few places, especially when off the main streets, equipped to handle credit card purchases.

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Croatia is a cash dominant country. The local currency is currently the kuna but will be adopting the euro in January 2023. (Image: Pexels)

When at a local ATM, always select the option to be billed in the destination’s local currency. This means in Croatia, you’ll be asked, “Would you like to be billed in HRK or in your card’s home currency?”, always choose HRK.

Before I round this off, here’s a bonus tip! Rather than paying enormous roaming costs or going through the hassle of contacting your service provider to ask about special rates, just purchase a local SIM card when you get to Croatia.

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Image: Pexels

For 85 hrk (€11), Hrvatski Telekom offers a 1-week unlimited mobile data plan so you don’t have to worry about accessing the internet during your vacation.

I hope you manage to put some of these tips into practice on your next Croatian vacation. For more advice and Croatian insights, check out our travel and lifestyle section.

Sunday, 13 February 2022

Commercial Accommodation Facilities See Large Increases in December and All of 2021

ZAGREB, 13 Feb 2022 - A total of 70.2 million bed nights were generated in commercial accommodation facilities in Croatia in 2021, 72% more than in 2020, with 63 million or 78% generated by foreign tourists, leading to a 297.6% increase in bed nights generated by foreign visitors in December.

In addition to the huge increase in bed nights compared to 2020, 12.8 million or 82.5% more tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities in 2021, and of that,10.6 million were foreigners, a 92% increase year-on-year, show data from the Croatian Bureau of Statistics (DZS).

In 2021, 2.1 million domestic tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities, or 46.6% more than in 2020, generating 7.3 million bed nights, up 36% from 2020.

December very good in terms of tourism results

In December 2021 alone, 117,400 domestic tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities, a 151% increase year-on-year, generating 227,200 bed nights or 123.2% more bed nights year-on-year.

An even greater increase on the year was generated by foreign tourists in December - there were 118,600 arrivals, an increase of as much as 656%, and 326,700 bed nights, an increase of 297.6%. Most bed nights were generated by Slovenians, Austrians, Germans, Russians and Italians.

Zagreb was among the most popular destinations visited in December, accounting for almost 29% of the total bed nights in that month, followed by Opatija and Split.

Hotels generated the most bed nights in December (54.3%), which was 4.7 times more than in December 2020, followed by rented rooms, apartments and holiday homes.

For more, check out our dedicated travel section.

Wednesday, 15 September 2021

Port For Smaller Boats Inaugurated in Rovinj

ZAGREB, 15 Sept, 2021 - The San Pelagio port, a new, HRK 53.4 million (€7.12 million) investment in the northern Adriatic city of Rovinj, which is expected to relieve the burden on the Andana port in the city centre, was opened on Wednesday.

The new port is intended exclusively for personal vessels up to eight metres in length, the Rovinj Port Authority said.

Port Authority head Donald Schiozzi said the new port was being opened ahead of 16 September, the Day of the City of Rovinj and its patron saint, St. Euphemia.

Mayor Marko Paliaga recalled that construction work on the new port started in late 2019, noting that currently more than 1,000 smaller vessels are registered in the city.

The largest part of the investment was contributed by Rovinj and its port authority, HRK 8.5 million was contributed by the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure while Istria County participated with HRK 1.6 million.

Josip Bilaver, State Secretary at the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure and the government's envoy at the inauguration of the port, said the government had recognised the importance of investing in port infrastructure and would continue with such projects.

(€1 = HRK 7.5)

For more about travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

 

Wednesday, 8 September 2021

Over 10,000 Yachts and Boats to be Removed From Registry Over Unpaid Fees

ZAGREB, 8 Sept, 2021 - Over 10,000 vessels will be erased from the Croatian registry of boats due to the failure of their owners to pay the navigation safety fee in 2019 and 2020, the Večernji List daily reported on Wednesday.

In late 2020, the Ministry of the Sea and Transport started bringing order to the registry, and so far 21,814 vessels have been removed from the registration list, the daily quoted the ministry as saying.

In October, the ministry will issue decisions on the removal of an additional 10,000 from the registry after it was established that until 15 August this year their owners had failed to pay the navigation safety fee for 2019 and 2020. The navigation safety fees in arrears for 2019 and 2020 exceed HRK 5 million (€666,000).

This national registry covers all Croatian nationality vessels.

Notices of possible removal from the registry will be also forwarded to all port authorities in Croatia and marinas' concession holders.

For more about travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 1 September 2021

Adriatic Heavy Metals: New Research Dives Deep into the Matter

September 1, 2021 - New research led by the scientists from Ruđer Bošković Institute (IRB) concerns Adriatic heavy metals. The current concentrations are small but worth monitoring. Learn more here.

With scientists from the prestigious Ruđer Bošković Institute (IRB) already publishing their results from measuring the salinity of the Adriatic, the new endeavors show that salt isn't the only thing worth exploring in Croatia's geographical and tourist ace.

IRB scientists Abra Penezić, Andrea Milinković, Saranda Bakija Alempijević, and Sanja Frka, alongside their colleague Silva Žužul from the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, authored a scientific article ''Atmospheric deposition of biologically relevant trace metals in the eastern Adriatic coastal area'' and published it in the renowned multidisciplinary journal - Chemosphere.

The research was focused on sedimentation traces of atmospheric metals on the surface of the Adriatic sea. The metals that were traced in this research were zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, nickel, and cadmium. With all of them being heavy metals (not in a fun, artistic way like Metallica or Iron Maiden) that pose a serious threat to human health, keeping a close eye on their levels in the Adriatic is a more than important task.

''Atmospheric transmission isn't just significant, it's often the dominant way in which natural and anthropogenic (man-made) transfers occur from land to the marine area. Once injected through processes of dry or wet sedimentation, atmospheric flying particles or aerosols become the outside source of nutritious but also toxic matter for marine ecosystems. Atmospheric sedimentation can be of significant value for waters that are poor in terms of nutritious salts, such as the area of central Adriatic,'' informed IRB in its press release.

They added that the coastal area of the Adriatic sea is under the constant influence of man-made aerosols of the urban and industrial areas of continental Europe. In addition, spring and summer see the influx of Sahara dust, and with the coastal area being a high-risk area of open fires, aerosol contribution increases. However, IRB states that the effect of fire aerosols on surface maritime systems still isn't being properly researched to this day.

''In this research, we looked at the variability of the concentration of biologically significant metals in traces and their sedimentation on the surface waters of the central Adriatic. At the Martinka sea station, we did a six-month-long sampling of PM10 particles, total sedimentation matter, seawater from a depth of one metre and the surface microlayer as the border between the sea and the atmosphere,'' explained the leading author, Dr. Abra Penezić.

PM10 is a problematic particle as it remains for a very long time in the atmosphere due to its small size and ability to remain there, warns the Belgian Interregional Environment Agency.

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Dr. Abra Penezić © Ruđer Bošković Institute

The research showed that in colder periods of the year, the increase of metal traces of zinc, cadmium, and lead in the Adriatic is owed to the heating systems and transportation from continental Europe.

In the summer, increased traffic emissions allow nickel, cobalt, and copper to be on the rise. The rain increases wet sedimentation and, along with open forest fires and Sahara dust, they become factors of increasing metal particles. The IRB press release states that while the concentration of this article is small, it is important to constantly monitor these levels.

''The results of this research will contribute to the further knowledge on processes on this specific area and the dynamics of the atmosphere and the sea,'' they explained from IRB.

This research is also part of the BiREADI research project. It began back in 2018 and will last until 2022 with a million kuna budget, the project aims to explore the complex dynamic and mutual influence of the atmosphere and the sea, an important and profound question to answer in respect both to the climate challenges we experience now and those that are yet to come.

Learn more about beaches in Croatia on our TC page.

For more about science in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

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