Wednesday, 15 June 2022

Croatian Air Traffic Recovers Completely, Zagreb Airport in Lead

June the 15th, 2022 - Croatian air traffic has well and truly recovered from the enormous amount of damage done to it as a result of the global coronavirus pandemic and all of the lockdowns and measures against travel for leisure that were introduced across Europe and the world.

As Poslovni Dnevnik/Darko Bicak writes, the fact that there was a complete recovery of Croatian air traffic after the global coronavirus pandemic has been very clearly shown by data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). Their information shows that in April 2022, the total passenger traffic at Croatian airports amounted to 580 thousand people, which is 654 percent more than in April 2021, when the country realised a turnover of a mere 77 thousand passengers.

The largest amount of Croatian air traffic in terms of passengers was realised by Zagreb's Franjo Tudjman International Airport, with 254 thousand passengers (an increase of 375.8 percent when compared to April 2021, which saw the transportation of 53 thousand passengers), followed by Split Airport with 132 thousand passengers and an increase of 842.1 percent when compared to April of last year (14 thousand passengers).

Dubrovnik Airport had 117 thousand passengers, which is an enormous increase compared to only eight thousand passengers in April 2021. Dubrovnik is still primarily an air destination owing the need to cross the border in and back out of neighbouring Bosnia and Herzegovina at Neum when travelling by car. The placing into function of the long awaited Peljesac bridge will likely aid that.

The most significant amount of international Croatian air traffic was realised with German airports, which transported 141 thousand passengers into Croatia, which is an increase of 650.3 percent when compared to the same period back in 2021.

The total number of aircraft landings and take-offs at all Croatian airports during April 2022 was 7,932, an increase of 126.7 percent when compared to April 2021, when the number of landings and take-offs stood at a mere 3,499.

The total cargo traffic at Croatian airports in April 2022 amounted to 728 tonnes, an encouraging increase of 14.5 percent when compared to April last year.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated travel section.

Thursday, 24 March 2022

Zagreb To Be Promoted On CA Flights To 15 Destinations

ZAGREB, 24 March 2022 - The national flag carrier Croatia Airlines (CA) and the Zagreb Tourist Board (TZGZ) will collaborate during the summer flight timetable and promote Zagreb's tourist attractions on 15 international flights, a press conference heard on Thursday.

The summer flight timetable starts on 27 March and lasts until the end of October and CA will be connected with Barcelona, Amsterdam, Athens, Vienna, Brussels, Dublin, Frankfurt, Copenhagen, London, Munich, Paris, Rome, Sarajevo, Skopje and Zurich.

The director of CA's commercial operations, Slaven Žabo, said that the summer timetable was expected to strongly contribute to developing Zagreb as a destination.

TZGZ director Martina Bienenfeld said that CA is the tourist board's strategic partner, which is logical because more than 50% of visitors to Zagreb arrive by plane while 30% come by car and the rest by other transport means.

The president of CA's management board, Jasmin Bajić, too, was pleased with the cooperation with TZGZ. Bajić expressed his gratitude for the cooperation and hope that the pandemic would be over soon.

"We hope the situation in Ukraine will not disrupt our plans. Over the past two pandemic years, CA continued to fly. We didn't stop. In 2021 we generated 70% of the 2019 turnover. This year that could be even higher because on some days during the summer we have up to 100 flights a day. Nevertheless, going back to the turnover of 2019... is not expected before the end of 2023 and before 2024," said Bajić.

He said that CA will fly with 12 planes during the 2022 summer season, the same as last year but two fewer than in 2019. Croatia will be connected with 21 international destinations with about 16,000 flights and just over 1.76 million seats.

 

Travel and destinations: For more on travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Monday, 7 March 2022

Croatia on a Shoestring: 10 Money Saving Tips for Travelers

7 March 2022 - Have rising costs from inflation put a slight dampener on your travel plans to Croatia? Fret not! We look at various ways you can enjoy a trip of a lifetime without breaking the bank featuring 10 money saving tips for travelers.

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Enjoy the best of Croatia without financial strain. (Image: Pexels)

1. Let’s start with an obvious one if you can: try to visit Croatia during the shoulder seasons, April - June for Spring and September to November for Fall. Not only do you avoid the shoulder-to-shoulder crowds, if you’re on the coast, but the sea is also still warm enough for a dip and you can still get away with a light jacket in the evenings.

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Fall is one of the best times of the year to visit. Image: (Zagreb leaves in Fall/Pexels)

On top of this, accommodation, attractions and activities are significantly cheaper. For instance, entry to Plitvice National Park is almost 50% less during shoulder seasons (300 kuna to 180 kuna). Imagine staying in a beachfront hotel with breakfast for only €55/night in November!

2. Start planning your vacation now! Early bookings ensure that you can lock in not only the best prices but also accommodations in prime locations.

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Sign up for newsletters, free memberships to access the best online deals. (Image: Pexels)

Don’t forget to use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) since prices can vary depending on where you are booking from. Using a VPN can make it look like you’re booking from another location, reducing prices further. Worth it to try and get the best online deals.

3. Be willing to mix and match flights If you’re traveling within the EU, rather than booking return tickets on the same airline, try looking for 2 one-way flights instead. I’ve scored a weekend flight for €9 one way from Lyon, France on one airline, and a return for another airline for €19.

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Tuesdays are often the cheapest days to fly. (Image: Volotea/Facebook)

If you’re visiting from outside the EU, scoring a cheap flight to Europe and then booking a secondary flight within the continent on a budget carrier is often the best way to go. Some of the airlines that frequently fly to Croatia within the EU include Volotea, Easyjet, Ryanair, TUI, Vueling, Wizzair, Eurowings, and Jet2.

4. When it comes to booking accommodation, see this article for how to get the absolute best deals. Alternatively, to lower costs further, maybe try your hand at camping at one of the many scenic spots around the country.

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Enjoy the beautiful outdoors. (Image: Pexels)

5. Instead of renting a car, use private bus transfers or if you’re feeling more adventurous and less pressed for time, trains, to get around the country.

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Zagreb's tram system is a fun way to get around. (Image: Pexels)

Companies such as Flixbus and Arriva run frequently over Summer, connecting you to major cities and attractions. Public transport within cities is also highly reliable and most Croatian cities are very walkable.

6. Keep an eye out for City Cards such as Splitcard or Zagreb card. These initiatives are run by most big cities in Croatia and are available for purchase at Tourist Information Centers or at the airport. They offer fantastic deals such as free entry to certain attractions, or huge discounts on tours, activities, shops, and even restaurants! Depending on the validity of your cards (24/48/72 hours), costs range between €10-20, which often includes free use of public transport within the city.

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Image: Visitsplit/Facebook

7. Take a ‘free’ walking tour to get a feel of local life and get to know the intricacies of the city. Often these tours are led by highly experienced locals who are able to share the rich history and culture of your chosen city.

As a bonus, they also have a wealth of insider information and will be able to advise you on the best local spots for you to keep exploring on your own. Here’s a tip for summer, always ask them where their favorite ice cream place is!

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Walking tours are also a quick way to get your bearings when in a new city. (Image: Pexels)

8. Eat like a local. Although Croatia does not offer “street food” per se, the local markets are a reasonable and equally delicious alternative. In addition to fresh produce, there are often bakeries (pekara) and small food stalls offering cold cuts, cheese, and fixings (e.g. marinated olives, peppers, pickles) to make any gastronomer a delish picnic.

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Products at the Green Market of Split. (Image: Visitsplit/Facebook)

 

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Grab fresh pastries and bread at any Pekara and pair it with a beverage for a quick and tasty meal. (Image: Pekara Dubravica/Facebook)

9. If you do head out for a meal, favor lunch over dinner. During lunch, restaurants are likely to offer specials or throw in a free drink or appetizer on occasion.

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Try to pair this meal with the local wine (stolno vino), beer (pivo), or spirits (rakija). Not only are they dangerously good, but imported brands are also 15-20% more expensive on average which can add up over time if you’re keeping an eye on your budget. Also, the tap water in Croatia is potable, which may further reduce your food spending.

10. If you don’t already have one, get a multi-currency bank account with an online bank such as Revolut or Wise. This way you’ll save on enormous ATM fees (10% in some cases) as most either offer free or lower fees up to a certain amount withdrawn. Croatia is a cash dominant country with few places, especially when off the main streets, equipped to handle credit card purchases.

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Croatia is a cash dominant country. The local currency is currently the kuna but will be adopting the euro in January 2023. (Image: Pexels)

When at a local ATM, always select the option to be billed in the destination’s local currency. This means in Croatia, you’ll be asked, “Would you like to be billed in HRK or in your card’s home currency?”, always choose HRK.

Before I round this off, here’s a bonus tip! Rather than paying enormous roaming costs or going through the hassle of contacting your service provider to ask about special rates, just purchase a local SIM card when you get to Croatia.

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Image: Pexels

For 85 hrk (€11), Hrvatski Telekom offers a 1-week unlimited mobile data plan so you don’t have to worry about accessing the internet during your vacation.

I hope you manage to put some of these tips into practice on your next Croatian vacation. For more advice and Croatian insights, check out our travel and lifestyle section.

Sunday, 13 February 2022

Commercial Accommodation Facilities See Large Increases in December and All of 2021

ZAGREB, 13 Feb 2022 - A total of 70.2 million bed nights were generated in commercial accommodation facilities in Croatia in 2021, 72% more than in 2020, with 63 million or 78% generated by foreign tourists, leading to a 297.6% increase in bed nights generated by foreign visitors in December.

In addition to the huge increase in bed nights compared to 2020, 12.8 million or 82.5% more tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities in 2021, and of that,10.6 million were foreigners, a 92% increase year-on-year, show data from the Croatian Bureau of Statistics (DZS).

In 2021, 2.1 million domestic tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities, or 46.6% more than in 2020, generating 7.3 million bed nights, up 36% from 2020.

December very good in terms of tourism results

In December 2021 alone, 117,400 domestic tourists stayed in commercial accommodation facilities, a 151% increase year-on-year, generating 227,200 bed nights or 123.2% more bed nights year-on-year.

An even greater increase on the year was generated by foreign tourists in December - there were 118,600 arrivals, an increase of as much as 656%, and 326,700 bed nights, an increase of 297.6%. Most bed nights were generated by Slovenians, Austrians, Germans, Russians and Italians.

Zagreb was among the most popular destinations visited in December, accounting for almost 29% of the total bed nights in that month, followed by Opatija and Split.

Hotels generated the most bed nights in December (54.3%), which was 4.7 times more than in December 2020, followed by rented rooms, apartments and holiday homes.

For more, check out our dedicated travel section.

Wednesday, 15 September 2021

Port For Smaller Boats Inaugurated in Rovinj

ZAGREB, 15 Sept, 2021 - The San Pelagio port, a new, HRK 53.4 million (€7.12 million) investment in the northern Adriatic city of Rovinj, which is expected to relieve the burden on the Andana port in the city centre, was opened on Wednesday.

The new port is intended exclusively for personal vessels up to eight metres in length, the Rovinj Port Authority said.

Port Authority head Donald Schiozzi said the new port was being opened ahead of 16 September, the Day of the City of Rovinj and its patron saint, St. Euphemia.

Mayor Marko Paliaga recalled that construction work on the new port started in late 2019, noting that currently more than 1,000 smaller vessels are registered in the city.

The largest part of the investment was contributed by Rovinj and its port authority, HRK 8.5 million was contributed by the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure while Istria County participated with HRK 1.6 million.

Josip Bilaver, State Secretary at the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure and the government's envoy at the inauguration of the port, said the government had recognised the importance of investing in port infrastructure and would continue with such projects.

(€1 = HRK 7.5)

For more about travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

 

Wednesday, 8 September 2021

Over 10,000 Yachts and Boats to be Removed From Registry Over Unpaid Fees

ZAGREB, 8 Sept, 2021 - Over 10,000 vessels will be erased from the Croatian registry of boats due to the failure of their owners to pay the navigation safety fee in 2019 and 2020, the Večernji List daily reported on Wednesday.

In late 2020, the Ministry of the Sea and Transport started bringing order to the registry, and so far 21,814 vessels have been removed from the registration list, the daily quoted the ministry as saying.

In October, the ministry will issue decisions on the removal of an additional 10,000 from the registry after it was established that until 15 August this year their owners had failed to pay the navigation safety fee for 2019 and 2020. The navigation safety fees in arrears for 2019 and 2020 exceed HRK 5 million (€666,000).

This national registry covers all Croatian nationality vessels.

Notices of possible removal from the registry will be also forwarded to all port authorities in Croatia and marinas' concession holders.

For more about travel in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 1 September 2021

Adriatic Heavy Metals: New Research Dives Deep into the Matter

September 1, 2021 - New research led by the scientists from Ruđer Bošković Institute (IRB) concerns Adriatic heavy metals. The current concentrations are small but worth monitoring. Learn more here.

With scientists from the prestigious Ruđer Bošković Institute (IRB) already publishing their results from measuring the salinity of the Adriatic, the new endeavors show that salt isn't the only thing worth exploring in Croatia's geographical and tourist ace.

IRB scientists Abra Penezić, Andrea Milinković, Saranda Bakija Alempijević, and Sanja Frka, alongside their colleague Silva Žužul from the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb, authored a scientific article ''Atmospheric deposition of biologically relevant trace metals in the eastern Adriatic coastal area'' and published it in the renowned multidisciplinary journal - Chemosphere.

The research was focused on sedimentation traces of atmospheric metals on the surface of the Adriatic sea. The metals that were traced in this research were zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, nickel, and cadmium. With all of them being heavy metals (not in a fun, artistic way like Metallica or Iron Maiden) that pose a serious threat to human health, keeping a close eye on their levels in the Adriatic is a more than important task.

''Atmospheric transmission isn't just significant, it's often the dominant way in which natural and anthropogenic (man-made) transfers occur from land to the marine area. Once injected through processes of dry or wet sedimentation, atmospheric flying particles or aerosols become the outside source of nutritious but also toxic matter for marine ecosystems. Atmospheric sedimentation can be of significant value for waters that are poor in terms of nutritious salts, such as the area of central Adriatic,'' informed IRB in its press release.

They added that the coastal area of the Adriatic sea is under the constant influence of man-made aerosols of the urban and industrial areas of continental Europe. In addition, spring and summer see the influx of Sahara dust, and with the coastal area being a high-risk area of open fires, aerosol contribution increases. However, IRB states that the effect of fire aerosols on surface maritime systems still isn't being properly researched to this day.

''In this research, we looked at the variability of the concentration of biologically significant metals in traces and their sedimentation on the surface waters of the central Adriatic. At the Martinka sea station, we did a six-month-long sampling of PM10 particles, total sedimentation matter, seawater from a depth of one metre and the surface microlayer as the border between the sea and the atmosphere,'' explained the leading author, Dr. Abra Penezić.

PM10 is a problematic particle as it remains for a very long time in the atmosphere due to its small size and ability to remain there, warns the Belgian Interregional Environment Agency.

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Dr. Abra Penezić © Ruđer Bošković Institute

The research showed that in colder periods of the year, the increase of metal traces of zinc, cadmium, and lead in the Adriatic is owed to the heating systems and transportation from continental Europe.

In the summer, increased traffic emissions allow nickel, cobalt, and copper to be on the rise. The rain increases wet sedimentation and, along with open forest fires and Sahara dust, they become factors of increasing metal particles. The IRB press release states that while the concentration of this article is small, it is important to constantly monitor these levels.

''The results of this research will contribute to the further knowledge on processes on this specific area and the dynamics of the atmosphere and the sea,'' they explained from IRB.

This research is also part of the BiREADI research project. It began back in 2018 and will last until 2022 with a million kuna budget, the project aims to explore the complex dynamic and mutual influence of the atmosphere and the sea, an important and profound question to answer in respect both to the climate challenges we experience now and those that are yet to come.

Learn more about beaches in Croatia on our TC page.

For more about science in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Tuesday, 17 August 2021

Hvar Town 2021 Photo Essay: Warm August Morning Moments

August 17, 2021 - They say that a picture says a thousand words... TCN reporter Ivor Kruljac teamed up with photographer Nina Lelas to explore the once-again bustling Hvar town center in August. Check out our Hvar Town 2021 photo essay to see for yourself! 

It was August 12 and the morning was brutally hot. The world-renowned sunny days on Hvar showed their dark side as I sweat profusely, looking as if someone threw a bucket of water on me.

Leaving my cool room at Pharos for a photo essay on Hvar in the morning felt like a suicide mission. But, one that would be quickly over as I expected nobody would be crazy enough to hang around the town's centre. I figured they would either be at the beach or at the pool and wait for the sun to go down to maybe take a stroll and grab a bite to eat for dinner in one of Hvar's excellent restaurants.

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People resisting sun © Nina Lelas

But to my surprise, the town was packed with people. Every cafe seat was completely taken and the main square saw people walking around to see the town. From Hvar's churches, museums, city walls, historical sites, and waterfront promenade with lovely yachts that move your imagination to daydream about a different kind of life – it is a perfect postcard that triggers people's curiosity. Surprisingly enough, the narrow streets next to the main square, which provide much more shade and have their own romantic side, are mostly empty. The few people we came across were actually moving from these refreshing pockets towards the main square. Perhaps, because so many apartments are packed in those streets, they are just not as attractive as many reside there due to accommodation. Take a look at a typical August morning of Hvar and start planning for next season.

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Enjoying coffee and drinks © Nina Lelas

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Every bit of shade welcome © Nina Lelas

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Apart from joy, Hvar can provide healthcare if needed too © Nina Lelas

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The main square beauty attracts people from every direction © Nina Lelas

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Lovely side streets of Hvar town © Nina Lelas

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Shade and vegetation of chilled side streets © Nina Lelas

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Admiring details on every corner © Nina Lelas

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Back to the Adriatic © Nina Lelas

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Yachts are nice but you don't have to drive, only relax when on catamaran © Nina Lelas

Learn more about Hvar on our TC page.

For more about traveling Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Monday, 16 August 2021

Hvar Town Budget Restaurants: Yes, They're Real

August 16, 2021 - Finding himself in a luxury destination with a not so luxurious budget, TCN reporter Ivor Kruljac avoided starvation by locating Hvar Town budget restaurants. Here are his suggestions. 

The words ''cheap price'' are very relative. It's much easier to determine a high price but what qualifies as actually cheap is a much tougher question. In that spirit, Hvar Town, known as one of the more popular and therefore more expensive destinations, lives up to its reputation. Last week, the Croatian media landscape was stunned by the bill issued at one of Hvar's elite clubs. The undoubtebly fun night that featured loads of high-quality beverages such as four 4,800 kuna worth bottles of Don Julio tequila reached the total amount of 99,154 kuna.

A one night spending spree on that level is downright impossible from journalist's income.

So, for the week in Hvar, it was convenient for my paycheck to serve both to feed my stomach after a relaxing day of SCS (swimming, chilling, and sightseeing), and in the meantime, why not inform the public on Hvar Town budget restaurants. Again, ''cheap eats'' may be a hard to define term, but here are some solutions which will nevertheless see you well fed for a little over 200 kuna. Three restaurants after which you don't have to file for bankruptcy, but you'll still have an enjoyable and quite the in-style dining experience. Why only three, you may ask? Well, I can't confirm these are indeed the only three options, but, well, there was sort of a limited budget involved in the research.

1.) Alviž

With a bus not really being the top of the list of options for the high class, it's convenient that one on-budget restaurant is located right at the Hvar Town bus station. From the outside, Alviž looks like some small diner where you might have to bump into other guests crowded into a small place as you munch on wooden tables and chairs. You might feel hesitant to come in, but one look at the menu that promises delicious meals at much more affordable prices makes it worth visiting. Once inside, you realise that the space is actually luxurious as you're taken to the backyard with a real Dalmatian ambiance. Wooden tables underneath brick rooftops and wooden ledges make way for wine, and you are in for a fantastic dining experience. The red and white wine options are fantastically refreshing, but sadly, the beer options are scarce. The food is served quickly and cooked to perfection. You can find a variety of dishes for under 150 kuna, but as the sides are purchased separately and you need to add the drink, you're in for bill of just over 200 kuna usually. Tested and recommended: Fried squid and four types of cheese pizza. Sadly, the fried squid would have gone well the traditional Dalmatian blitva (chard), but one minus to the venue is that you can't order it as a separate side-dish. Still, the squid and fries go together very well.

 

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Fried squid and four types of cheese pizza © Nina Lelas

2.) Villa Dinka

Here's another restaurant with a strong Dalmatian vibe squeezed in between the Amfora and Pharos hotels. This time, there are no wine grapes growing above you, and it looks a bit more formal, but it is nevertheless a cozy place to dine with a stunning view of the Adriatic and the Paklenski islands to trigger your appetite. Again, the sides must be ordered additionally, but along with one drink, the bill doesn't hit higher than a little over 200 kuna. When dining with one more person, meat platas for two are definitely the best bet for meat lovers in Croatia to both get full and to save money. Villa Dinka is no exception to that rule, but they upped their game and topped the usual meat offer of Čevapi, shish kebab and steaks by also adding lamb chops and beefsteak. A delicious upgrade!

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Meat plata from Villa Dinka © Nina Lelas

3.) Đordota Vartal

Not too far from the Franciscan Monastery, Đordota Varta seems to have been crowned as the best on-budget restaurant in all of Hvar Town. The restaurant was completely filled, but people were persistent in waiting in line, hoping to get some food. Once inside, you could see why. Another typical Dalmatian restaurant, with the craftsmanship of Dalmatia being the leading theme as the restaurant is decorated with saws and other tools people on Hvar used in the past. The dishes are accompanied by sides, but you can order more if needed. The tuna steak is absolutely divine, with big portions cooked to perfection, perhaps one of the best-grilled tuna steak's I've had in all of Croatia. For meat lovers, the satisfactorily filled portion of the traditional Dalmatian Pašticada with gnocchi is a must. The beer and wine selection were alright, but not very memorable thanks to the restaurant's short but well-executed cocktail list, with 50-60 kuna per cocktail it obviously isn't the cheaper thrill to get, but these prices are quite standard for coastal Croatia and more accessible than many drinks from other cocktail bars Hvar has to offer. One sip of that delicious pina colada pays up a triple in pleasure.

If you're too hungry to remember to reserve your table and you're also too hungry to wait for the aforementioned goodies, you can also opt for the restaurant's beach terrace. Sadly, over there, you can only order pizza, but the dedication of the staff will nonetheless make sure that pizza, while affordable, is next level compared to your usual experience.

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Delicious Pašticada and tuna steak © Nina Lelas

Learn more about Hvar on our TC page.

For more about traveling Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 11 August 2021

Croatian Beach vs Pool Dilemma: Arguments For Both Sides Overview

August 11, 2021 - Looking at the broad offer of swimming options on Adriatic, you may find yourself in the middle of a Croatian beach vs pool dilemma. TCN reporter Ivor Kruljac found pros for both sides.

With exciting history, heritage, and interesting experiences to be had, coastal Croatia and the Croatian islands known how to sell what they've got. The clear, refreshing, and clean sea has been the most valuable arsenal in Croatia's tourist offer from the very start.

In that spirit, it may seem unusual to see many hotels with glorious sea views and short walks to beaches that have pools, both indoors and outdoors. Sure, the indoor pools are great if you have the misfortunate of some bad weather when you're dying for a swim, but do outdoor pools really make sense next to the lovely Adriatic?

Well, both sides of this argument have valid points. Here is a shortlist of the cases when one dominates over the other in this epic Croatian beach vs pool debate.

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Looking for safe fun? Then the pool wins

With Croats enjoying the reputation of being ready to help and watching over others, and even with some of the beaches having lifeguards, pools are definitely the safer option if swimming isn't your strong side. The majority of pools have a shallow and deeper end, and while the sea can suddenly become deeper than you what you've bargained for, the transition is much easier in the pool.

If you do get cramp or get in some sort of trouble, even if other swimmers don't respond, you can be sure that hotel staff will pull you out just in time. The rules of conduct (which you have to oblige to) ensure your safety and that of the other guests. The limits of a pool can make it easier for you to watch over your kids while they have safe aquatic fun. In addition, sea urchins or painful rocks on which you can hit yourself while entering the Adriatic, as well as small pebbles that can be annoying on the soles of your feet, aren't an issue in a controlled pool environment. sea_vic_1.jpg

Looking for space? Then a Croatian beach will win

If you feel claustrophobic in the small and typically confined limits of the pool, then a Croatian beach is the best place to go for a longer swim. With experienced swimmers being able to swim from one side of the pool over the other, the sea provides a better challenge in terms of routes and directions you can take. Additionally, pools can be quite crowded, and if you want to take a refreshing dip as some ''zen'' time for yourself, then chilling in the Adriatic can be done at a more considerable distance from others that came to enjoy the day.

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Do you fancy a space reserved just for you? Head to the pool

We all know that moment of frustration when a beach is crowded like hell, and you just can't find a place to leave your towel for the life of you. As pools are limited to the guests of the hotel, you can rest assured that when you arrive poolside, you'll manage to be able to find a place to soak up the sun and get a nice tan after you're done with swimming as the hotel calculates the maximum number of people that they can accommodate at any one time (at least the good hotels do).

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 Broadening your circle of friendship? Then a Croatian beach wins

With the Croatian hotel scene being more and more frequently branded to attract certain clientele, those who are interested in meeting new people on holiday, can expect that other guests in the hotel are similar to them in terms of interest and lifestyle. That's great, but keep in mind that other guests may just be interested in chilling, eating, and sleeping in the hotel, and not really socialising. On the other hand, the world of the Croatian beach is much more dynamic and with long history of interesting real and fictional stories (in books and movies) about awesome friendships and passionate relationships which started with an exchanged glance at the beach; the beach is the place to meet new people.

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Want to be content with the water? The pool wins

When it comes to the Croatian beach offer, there are many types to choose from. Some beaches don't only offer unhindered access to the beautiful Adriatic as their lure but also much more, such as flotation devices to waterslides, sunbeds, and more. That said, certain pools also have more content than another. But, as a guest of the hotel, you can use everything that has been included in the price of your stay, while beaches (in the majority of cases at least) charge extra for these additional features. croatian-beach-683035_1280.jpg

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Do you want to experience nature at its finest? Then the beach wins

With pools being man-made, they lack the joy of coming across unexpected discoveries which is what the sea offers. From pebbles to seaweed or sand underneath you to fish and other marine life sharing the swim with you, your experience in the Adriatic isn't just an opportunity to relax and freshen up but also to connect closely with nature. When a wave comes, those who are more in the market for excitement will surely have their blood pumping that bit harders as they are carried by the waves. You can also lie on the beach and enjoy the zen the sound of calm waves brings free of charge.

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If proximity is what you're after, then the pool wins

When you're searching for a hotel, you probably want the one which is as close as possible to a beautiful Croatian beach. However, if you're a bit of out shape (with no desire to really improve that), and you learn that the promised three-minute walk to the beach lasts up to seven minutes or more at your pace and you just don't feel like walking that much as the heat is draining the life out of you, then the pools are right there inside the hotel complex. The only way to dive in for some aquatic refreshment faster is to take a shower in the hotel room, but really, where is the fun in that?

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Viva la anarchia! – The beach wins

As mentioned above, pools are safer, not just because of their size and safe terrain, but also because of the rules they have. That said, if you've arrived at your destination listening to the greatest Sex Pistols hits and that little anarchist in you ready to get wild, head over to the beach to learn a whole new meaning of freedom. Swim where you want, jump from wherever you want (at your own risk, of course), and as long as you don't pollute the sea, pose a threat to other people or endanger the native marine life, where your sense of creativity ends is your only limit. Swim any time you want. You don't have to take a shower before diving in, and as many Croats will whisper to you in a clandestine manner when nobody is listening: you're free to pee in the sea if you need to.

The Croatian coast has you covered - the choice is yours

These are some of the arguments to help you decide would you prefer to be by the pool or next to a Croatian beach. Since the Croatian coast can offer both salty and freshwater options for your enjoyable holiday, it's best to try out both.

Learn more about beaches in Croatia on our TC page.

For more about the Croatian Adriatic Sea, follow TCN's dedicated page.

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