Monday, 3 May 2021

Šibenik Open-Air Library, Dedicated to the Great Writer Vesna Parun

May 3, 2021 - The Šibenik open-air library will be the third small open-air library in the city. This library, the work of Mario Juras, known as Lulas, will be officially presented on Friday, April 30, starting at 10 am, at the Nursery in Vidice, Šibenik.

Šibenski.hr reports, this time Radio Šibenik, with the support of the City of Šibenik and the Cultural Association Fotopoetika, is giving it away to all its fellow citizens and visitors to Krešimir's city. 

"I'm lying in bed waiting for the rhythm, for the music to take me. As in a dream, I am rich in emerald bays, pines, capes, caves, stalagmites", said the great Vesna Parun in an interview in 2014 (My World).

Šibenik County Radio is dedicating the open-air library, 'Salto Mortale' to Vesna Parun, for which the foundations were laid this Tuesday, April 27, in the afternoon. 

"As Šibenik is a city that is a friend of children, a city of young people, it is a city of culture from the city center to other parts of the city. This time we went to the Rasadnik, which until recently was a neglected park, and now is an example of successful cooperation of the city administration with the representatives of the neighborhood and we are turning it into an urban living room. And I hope that this is just one in a series of activities to spread culture", said Deputy Mayor Rakić.

The 'Salto Mortale' library is the third of its kind in Šibenik, and this one has found its place under the canopy of tall pine trees in Rasadnik - a place rich in content for the quality pastime of fellow citizens of all ages, from the youngest to the oldest.

"With this project, as Salto Mortale is primarily a project that will last two months, and will bring a handful of beautiful things to the people of Šibenik in places they would never think of, we want to enrich our city with exactly the content that our fellow citizens love. The location was not chosen by chance either. Namely, Rasadnik is a gathering place for many people from Šibenik, small and large, and is located on the way to the future student center Palacin. We wanted to complete the story and add a cultural, literary note to the place", said longtime editor Živana Podrug.

The name of Vesna Parun was not taken by chance either. The library is named after her collection of poems published in 1981 to mark the centenary of the great poet's birth on April 10, 2022. Also, Radio Šibenik and partners with this project join the celebration of 2021 as the Year of Reading by the decision of the Ministry of Culture and Reading.

For more about lifestyle in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page

Saturday, 1 May 2021

New Sibenik Camera is Replica of First to Film Area 123 Years Ago

May the 1st, 2021 - The beautiful Sibenik waterfront has now got a brand new installation in honour of the very first camera which took film footage of this part of Europe 123 years ago. The new Sibenik camera, more precisely the installation will be called ''Alexandre Promio in Sibenik again''.

As Morski writes, the installation "Alexandre Promio in Šibenik again" was set up on the Sibenik waterfront - a replica of the first film camera, which, back at the very end of April 123 years ago, shot the oldest piece of film footage from this part of Europe.

The mind behind the Sibenik camera installation is Zoran Lucic Luca, and the presentation of the installation was attended by Mayor Zeljko Buric, his associates and the Director of the Tourist Board of the City of Sibenik, Dino Karadjole.

''123 years ago, people realised how beautiful this city is and how interesting its surroundings are. If there were no such people in Sibenik, such as Zoran Lucic Luca, they'd probably never know some of the stories from this city's rich history,'' stated Zeljko Buric as the new Sibenik camera was put in place.

In Croatian cinematography, records state that the oldest piece of film footage from the territory of Croatia and this part of Europe is a recording called "Sibenik Port" from 1904. That piece of film is the work of English cameraman Frank Mottershow. This was written in the history books, the Croatian Audio Visual Centre (HAVC) and the Croatian Cinematheque until 2005, when a professor from the Academy of Dramatic Arts (ADU) in Zagreb, prof. Enes Midzic quite by chance happened to find a strange title: "Salut dans les vergues de Alexandre Promio, Sibenik, 28th/29th April, 1898'' somewhere on the Internet. Professor Midzic then went to the French capital of Paris to try to discover more and found seven such short films.

The films "Pozdrav s jarbola/Greetings from the foremast", "Dolazak i sidrenje broda/The arrival and the anchoring of the ship", "Priprema za boj/Preparation for battle", "Regata (prolazak)/Regatta (passage)," and ''Regata (povratak)/Regatta (return)'' were all shot in the port of Sibenik because they clearly show the recognisable landscape of Martinska and the Sibenik Bay, with the exception being the film "Priprema za boj/Preparation for battle". Thar piece of footage was shot on one of the two vessels seen in the other films, so it can be assumed that the film was also shot in the port of Sibenik.

These incredible pieces of film are the oldest preserved film records in the Republic of Croatia and this part of Europe overall.

Zoran Lucic Luca therefore wants to mark this event in this way, and highlight a place that is important for Croatian history and culture, and especially for Sibenik. The opening of this Sibenik camera announces the theme of this year's project by Zoran Lucic Luca and the Tourist Board of the City of Sibenik - an event called "Light is life".

For all you need to know about Sibenik in 2021, check out Sibenik in a Page.

Monday, 12 April 2021

HNL Round 28 Recap: Hajduk Defeats Istra 1961, Osijek and Slaven Belupo Draw

April 12, 2021 - The 28th round of the Croatian First League was held from April 10-11, 2021. In this round, Hajduk defeats Istra 1961, Osijek and Slaven Belupo draw, and Rijeka narrowly tops Sibenik. 

Gorica v. Varazdin (0:0)

Gorica and Varazdin opened the 28th round on Saturday, April 10, 2021, in Velika Gorica. 

The first half went without goals, and the VAR called a goal offside for Gorica in the 52nd minute. The match ended at 0:0.

 

Gorica is currently in 3rd place with 39 points, while Varazdin is in 9th with 24. 

Sibenik v. Rijeka (0:1)

Sibenik and Rijeka met on Saturday, April 10, 2021, in Sibenik. 

The only goal of the match came in the 72nd minute when Drmic scored for 0:1. 

 

Sibenik is currently in 7th place with 27 points, while Rijeka is in 4th with 45. 

Slaven Belupo v. Osijek (2:2)

Belupo and Osijek met on Sunday, April 11, 2021, in Koprivnica. 

Bogojevic scored the first goal of the match for 1:0. Belupo in the 36th minute. Zaper equalized for Osijek just before the half for 1:1. 

Knoll put Belupo back in the lead for 2:1 in the 52nd minute, and Kleinheisler scored the equalizer in the 71st for the final score of 2:2.

 

Belupo is currently in 6th place with 27 points, while Osijek is in 2nd with 62. 

Istra 1961 v. Hajduk (0:1)

Istra and Hajduk met in Pula on Sunday, April 11, 2021. 

Simic scored in the 68th minute for the Hajduk lead. VAR called Nayir's goal offside in the final minute of the match. Istra's Blagojevic was booked for his second yellow in the 88th minute. 

 

Istra is currently in 8th place with 24 points, while Hajduk is in 5th with 43. 

Lokomotiva v. Dinamo (0:2)

Lokomotiva and Dinamo closed out the 28th round on Sunday, April 12, 2021. 

Gvardiol scored for 0:1 Dinamo in the 30th minute. Atiemwen increased Dinamo's lead to 0:2 in the 70th, which was the final score of the match. 

 

Lokomotiva is currently in the last place with 20 points, while Dinamo is in 1st with 64. 

You can see the full HNL table HERE

To follow the latest sports news in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

To learn more about sport in Croatia, CLICK HERE

Saturday, 10 April 2021

More Room Needed in Šibenik's Trokut Center: Nomads Have Arrived

April 10, 2021 - The Trokut Center for New Technologies and Entrepreneurship in Šibenik has become a place that brings together young entrepreneurs from Croatia the world. 

Šibenski Portal reports that there are currently six digital nomads there, while there are 33 tenants in the coworking space. A total of 18 companies uses the premises. Trokut is worth 28 million kunas and was built and equipped with co-financing from the European Regional Development Fund. The City of Šibenik received 20 million kunas in grants.

The Trokut Center was recently nominated for the Association of Croatian Architects award, Viktor Kovacic, for the most achievement in all architectural creativity areas in 2020.

"The center currently employs three people, as our goal is to encourage students to get involved in the Trokut Center itself. Last week we released a call to students who have free time to help us with our daily work in the center", says Diana Mudrinic, Director of the incubator for new technologies, the Trokut Center. 

Currently, the Trokut Center's capacity is complete, and the free space around 90%. The company is striving to expand the reach currently built on two floors with a total area of ​​more than 2,000 square meters. The center has 28 flexible spaces of workshops, offices, and cabins.

"For now, our customers are mainly in the IT industry. We can offer them a comfortable environment, workplace, desk, and colleagues to help them develop their businesses. I would especially like to point out our entrepreneurial incubator. We released a public call where the goal is for two months, for enterprising beginners to learn absolutely everything they need for business and their products. In the end, judges will choose to award the top 3 ideas, where the first place gets 50, the second 30, and the third 20 thousand kunas", says Mudrinic. 

The Trokut Project, worth almost 28 million kunas, the city of Šibenik received 20 million kunas from the European regional development fund. European investment in Šibenik should also attract users from all over the world and be financially sustainable.

"Digital nomads are one direction in which the Trokut Center is heading towards, and we already have them now. Some of our guests are from Latvia, India, and the Netherlands. The Digital Nomad trend is slowly but surely moving, and our goal is to become one central place for digital nomads where we can help them apply for digital nomad visas. The goal is to be self-sustainable in 3 years, according to the project rule." 

The purpose of the project is to develop innovative entrepreneurial and business infrastructure for the provision of new and better services. The aim is to encourage the growth and development of small and medium enterprises and create new jobs in Šibenik-Knin County.

Ivana Juran Magdic, from the project office in shipbuilding Levant, has her workspace in Murter but still decided to use The Trokut Center's space. "It’s very comfortable. It’s close to everything, and everyone is thrilled, from business partners, clients, and so on. I was afraid of what a coworking area will look like as I've never done that, I've been alone in the office for 12 years, so this is a new experience. It encouraged me to keep the business going", said Magdic. 

Franka Bujas, the F5 graphic design services business owner, found The Trokut Center to be a comfortable place to work in. "At first, I was working from home, looking and thinking of a space like this. However, when the Trokut Center was made, I was unsure, but the decision was made when I came here and saw what everything looks like and what it has to offer. I was thrilled, so I decided to come here. It is fully equipped for all my needs, the meeting room that is important to me looks professional. I think this is ideal for all beginners and, more specifically, larger companies." 


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Franka Bujas founder of F5 via Trokut Šibenik - Inkubator za nove tehnologije Facebook

Franka found friends in the Trokut Center who are an additional plus to that space in the space itself and the working conditions. "The working atmosphere is great, and people are young, the atmosphere is motivating. The staff is great, and they are always available for whatever is needed." 

At the opening ceremony, Diana Mudrinic, Director of the incubator for new technologies, the Trokut Center, stated the Trokut Center is the home of new generation entrepreneurs and expressed hope that Šibenik would soon become the central place of the IT community in Croatia.

For more about made in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Tuesday, 30 March 2021

Sibenik Company Cantabile Strengthens Business Despite Coronavirus Crisis

March the 30th, 2021 - The Sibenik company Cantabile is going from strength to strength despite the ongoing coronavirus crisis thanks to the Sibenik business zone - Podi.

As Poslovni Dnevnik/Darko Bicak writes, the Dalmatian city of Sibenik's Podi business zone, despite the coronavirus crisis, is doing well to manage to maintain the economic activity of its enterprises, and news of new investments is coming in almost on a monthly basis.

One of those enterprises is the Sibenik company Cantabile, which purchased 5,853 square metres of land within the business zone, with plans to build its new and unified plant for the production of confectionery products there.

As Ante Gulin, the owner and director of the Sibenik company Cantabile revealed, this company was established a decade ago and initially, through its exclusive catering brand Moderato Coffee & Cakes, was engaged in the production of sweets, but for the last four or five years their main sales channel has been HoReCa for clients from Istria to Dubrovnik, and recently they've been present here in Zagreb with their range.

"We realised that we needed to standardise our production because only that can guarantee quality and recognition out there on the market. We're currently present at three production sites in Sibenik, which we now want to combine with a new production facility into one.

If you work only for yourself, then we're talking about relatively small quantities, but when you add the exceptional seasonality that is a reality in Sibenik and along the entire Adriatic coast, then it's clear that you're in trouble with that attitude, both because of the quantities and because of the workforce as things run seasonally and you have to make great efforts to be able to get your hands on quality employees every year,'' said Gulin when discussing the reasons as to why this company decided to step out more strongly into the wholesale market.

Currently, 20 percent of the Sibenik company Cantabile's sales are accounted for by their own capacities, and 80 percent by HoReCa, with a tendency for further growth.

"We have a quality product based on quality, Croatian raw materials - lavender, cherries, olives, carob, etc, all of which the market recognises and seeks. Now, with a small capacity and dislocated production, we aren't able to complete the entire system of procurement and control of those local raw materials, but with this investment, we'll manage to achieve this,'' explained Gulin.

The new plant in Sibenik should be operational by the end of this year, and construction work in Podi is expected to begin soon. As the owner of the Sibenik company Cantabile explained, the value of the construction works stands at around five million kuna, and with the equipping of the plant with machines and equipment, this investment will rise to 12 to 14 million kuna.

The new plant should employ about 50 new people, but their specific number, which could be even higher, will still depend on the state of the market, the tourist season, and especially on the situation regarding the coronavirus crisis and the state of the economy and society as a whole.

The planned area of ​​the Sibenik business zone is 550 hectares, and so far 130 hectares have been built, while about 100 hectares are currently available for construction. There are currently about 50 enterprises operating within the zone, who employed 1,350 workers at the end of last year. This figure sadly at the beginning of 2021 due to the continuing pandemic.

However, as Jakov Terzanovic, the director of Podi pointed out, the number of employees from last year should soon return with new investments, and by the end of the year they will surpass those old numbers. There are currently 10 active contracts with various enterprises who will likely build their respective plants within this zone this year, and most of them will start doing business there too.

At the beginning of the year, it was announced that the plot of 70 thousand square metres was snapped up by the largest Croatian retailer of sanitary equipment, Feroterm, and the other, covering 11 thousand square metres, was purchased by SeaTech. Feroterm plans to build a large logistics centre for the whole of Dalmatia in Podi, and the German investor SeaTech would build a factory in Sibenik for the production of ship rescue and service equipment.

In addition to the Sibenik company Cantabile, the land in Podi has been bought by a company named Rock, which comes from the construction sector, and on a plot of 7977 square metres, it intends to build a hall for the production of building elements with storage and office space. Terzanovic also announced that a new tender for the sale of a plot of 5,682 square metres is currently being prepared.

For more on Croatian companies and doing business in Croatia, follow our business section. For current coronavirus information specific to Croatia, including border and travel rules, as well testing centres up and down the country, bookmark this page.

Wednesday, 10 March 2021

Meteorite in Dalmatia, Experts Begin Search and Investigation

March the 10th, 2021 - First a pandemic, now a meteorite. A meteorite in Dalmatia has prompted an investigation and a search for the rock from space somewhere around the Sibenik hinterland.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes, back at the end of February this year, the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) recorded the fall of meteors in the area of ​​Dalmatia, more precisely in the hinterland of the City of Sibenik. This event was filmed by four cameras that are part of the system of more than 30 cameras operating under the Croatian Meteor Network. It is quite certain that the meteor "survived" the fall through the Earth´s atmosphere, and the Croatian Meteor Network is currently busy organising a search for the meteorite in Dalmatia.

As the aforementioned network explained to Dalmatia Danas (Today), it is necessary to search for the rest of the rock from space as soon as possible, because such ¨items¨ from space are strongly influenced by our atmospheric conditions, primarily humidity and precipitation. After finding a meteorite, it is best to preserve it in a vacuum, ie in conditions that will not affect it much.

¨The burning of a meteor starts at about 140 kilometres in height, and up to 40 kilometres in height it usually either burns up or "goes out". If it is not completely burned up or has not completely disintegrated, a "dark flight" occurs. Then altitude winds are very important, the values ​​of which are known by altitude meteorological measurements. All this affects the trajectory, and then we can determine quite precisely where the meteorite fell,¨ they explained from the Croatian Meteor Network when discussing the meteorite in Dalmatia.

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Friday, 19 February 2021

People also ask Google: What is Croatia Famous For?

February 19, 2021 – What is Croatia Famous For?

People outside of the country really want to know more about Croatia. They search for answers online.

Here, we'll try to answer the popular search terms “What is Croatia famous for?” and “What is Croatia known for?”

Most of the people looking for answers to these questions have never been to Croatia. They may have been prompted to ask because they're planning to visit Croatia, they want to come to Croatia, or because they heard about Croatia on the news or from a friend.

What Croatia is known for depends on your perspective. People who live in the country sometimes have a very different view of what Croatia is famous for than the rest of the world. And, after visiting Croatia, people very often leave with a very different opinion of what Croatia is known for than before they came. That's because Croatia is a wonderful country, full of surprises and secrets to discover. And, it's because internet searches don't reveal everything. Luckily, you have Total Croatia News to do that for you.

What is Croatia known for?

1) Holidays


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Croatia is best known globally as a tourist destination. Catching sight of pictures of the country online is enough to make almost anyone want to come. If you've heard about it from a friend, seen the country used in a TV show like Game of Thrones or Succession, or watched a travel show, your mind will be made up. Following such prompts, it's common for Croatia to move to first place on your bucket list. If it's not already, it should be, There are lots of reasons why Croatia is best known for holidays (vacations).

a) Islands


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What is Croatia famous for? Islands © Mljet National Park

Within Croatia's tourist offer, its most famous aspect is its islands. Croatia has over a thousand islands - 1246 when you include islets. 48 Croatian islands are inhabited year-round, but many more come to life over the warmer months. Sailing in Croatia is one of the best ways to see the islands, and if you're looking for a place for sailing in the Mediterranean, Croatia is the best choice because of its wealth of islands. These days, existing images of Croatia's islands have been joined by a lot more aerial photography and, when people see these, they instantly fall in love.

b) Beaches


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What is Croatia famous for? Its holidays are famous for their beaches © Szabolcs Emich

Croatia has 5835 kilometres of coastline on the Adriatic Sea - 1,777.3 kilometres of coast on the mainland, and a further 4,058 kilometres of coast around its islands and islets. The Croatian coast is the most indented of the entire Mediterranean. This repeated advance and retreat into the Adriatic forms a landscape littered with exciting, spectacular peninsulas, quiet, hidden bays, and some of the best beaches in the world. There are so many beaches in Croatia, you can find a spot to suit everyone. On the island of Pag and in the Zadar region, you'll find beaches full of young people where the party never stops. Elsewhere, romantic and elegant seafood restaurants hug the shoreline. Beach bars can range from ultra-luxurious to basic and cheap. The beaches themselves can be popular and full of people, facilities, excitement and water sports, or they can be remote, idyllic, and near-deserted, accessible only by boat. Sand, pebble, and stone all line the perfectly crystal-clear seas which are the common feature shared by all.

c) Dubrovnik


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What is Croatia famous for? Dubrovnik © Ivan Ivanković

As a backdrop to Game Of Thrones and movies from franchises like Star Wars and James Bond, Dubrovnik is known all over the world. Everybody wants to see it in person, and that's why it's an essential stop-off for so many huge cruise ships in warmer months. But, Dubrovnik's fame did not begin with the invention of film and television. The city was an autonomous city-state for long periods of time in history, and Dubrovnik was known all over Europe – the famous walls which surround the city of Dubrovnik are a testament to a desire to maintain its independent standing for centuries while living in the shadow of expanding, ambitious empires.

d) Heritage


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What is Croatia famous for? Heritage. Pula amphitheatre is one of the best-preserved Roman amphitheatres in the world

The walled city of Dubrovnik is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Croatia's rich architectural and ancient heritage. Diocletian's Palace in Split is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and still the living, breathing centre of life in the city (that people still live within it and it is not preserved in aspic is one of its most charming features and no small reason for its excellent preservation).

Having existed on the line of European defence against the Ottoman empire, Croatia also has many incredible fortresses and castles. The fortresses of Sibenik are well worth seeing if you're visiting Sibenik-Knin County and its excellent coast. A small number of Croatia's best castles exist on the coast, Rijeka's Trsat and Nova Kraljevica Castle is nearby Bakar being two of them. Most of Croatia's best and prettiest castles are actually located in its continental regions which, compared to the coast, remain largely undiscovered by most international tourists.

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Many spectacular castles in the country's continental regions are, for these parts, what is Croatia famous for

Pula amphitheatre (sometimes referred to as Pula Arena) is one of the largest and best-preserved Roman amphitheatres in the world. A spectacular sight year-round, like Diocletian's Palace, it remains a living part of the city's life, famously hosting an international film festival, concerts by orchestras, opera stars, and famous rock and pop musicians. Over recent years, it has also played a part in the city's music festivals.

e) Music Festivals


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What is Croatia famous for? Music festivals © Khris Cowley

There is a very good reason why the city of Pula leapt massively up the list of most-researched online Croatian destinations over the last decade. It played host to two of the country's most famous international music festivals. Though the music at some of these can be quite niche, the global attention they have brought to the country is simply massive. Clever modern branding and marketing by the experienced international operators who host their festivals in Croatia mean that millions of young people all over the world have seen videos, photos and reviews of Croatia music festivals, each of them set within a spectacular backdrop of seaside Croatia.

f) Plitvice Lakes and natural heritage


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What is Croatia Famous For? Plitvice Lakes, national parks and natural heritage

Known for its chain of 16 terraced lakes and gushing waterfalls, Plitvice Lakes is the oldest, biggest and most famous National Park in Croatia. Everybody wants to see it. And many do. But that's not the be-all and end-all of Croatia's stunning natural beauty. Within the country's diverse topography, you'll find 7 further National Parks and 12 Nature Parks which can be mountain terrain, an archipelago of islands, or vibrant wetlands.

2) Football


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What is Croatia famous for? Football. Seen here, Luka Modric at the 2018 World Cup © Светлана Бекетова

The glittering international careers of Croatian footballers Luka Modrić, Ivan Rakitić, Ivan Perišić, Mario Mandžukić, and others have in recent years advertised Croatia as a factory of top-flight footballing talent. They helped put Croatia football on the map with fans of European football. Football fans in Croatia have a very different perception of just how famous Croatian football is to everyone else in the world. If you talk to a Croatian fan about football, it's almost guaranteed that they will remind you of a time (perhaps before either of you were born) when their local or national team beat your local or national team in football. 99% of people will have no idea what they are talking about. The past occasions which prompt this parochial pride pale into insignificance against the Croatian National Football Team's achievement in reaching the World Cup Final of 2018. This monumental occasion brought the eyes of the world on Croatia, extending way beyond the vision of regular football fans. Subsequently, the internet exploded with people asking “Where is Croatia?”

Sports in general are what is Croatia known for

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Croatians are enthusiastic about sports and engage in a wide number of them. The difference in perception between how Croats view the fame this gets them and the reality within the rest of the world is simply huge. Rowing, basketball, wrestling, mixed martial arts, tennis, handball, boxing, waterpolo, ice hockey, skiing and volleyball are just some of the sports in which Croatia has enthusiastically supported individuals and local and national teams. Some of these are regarded as minority sports even in other countries that also pursue them. Croatians don't understand this part. If you say to a Croatian “What is handball? I never heard of that,” they will look at you like you are crazy or of below-average intelligence.

3) Zagreb


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What is Croatia famous for? Its capital city Zagreb is becoming increasingly better known

Over relatively recent years, the Croatian capital has skyrocketed in terms of fame and visitor numbers. Tens of thousands of people from all over the world now come to visit Zagreb each year. Its massive new success can be partly attributed to the rising popularity of international tourism in some areas of Asia (and Zagreb being used as a setting for some television programmes made in some Asian countries) and the massive success of Zagreb's Advent which, after consecutively attaining the title of Best European Christmas Market three times in a row, has become famous throughout the continent and further still. Zagreb's fame is not however restricted to tourism. Zagreb is known for its incredible Austro-Hungarian architecture, its Upper Town (Gornji Grad) and the buildings there, an array of museums and city centre parks and as home to world-famous education and scientific institutions, like to Ruder Boskovic Institute and the Faculty of Economics, University of Zagreb.

4) Olive oil


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What is Croatia famous for? Olive oil

Croatian olive oil is the best in the world. Don't just take out word for it! Even the experts say so. In 2020, leading guide Flos Olei voted Istria in northwest Croatia as the world's best olive oil growing region for a sixth consecutive year. Olive oil production is an ancient endeavour in Croatia, and over hundreds of years, the trees have matured, and the growers learned everything there is to know. Olive oil is made throughout a much wider area of Croatia than just Istria, and local differences in climate, variety, and soil all impact the flavour of the oils produced. Croatian has no less than five different olive oils protected at a European level under the designation of their place of origin. These and many other Croatian olive oils are distinct and are among the best you're ever likely to try.

5) There was a war here


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What is Croatia famous for? A relatively recent war left its mark on the country © Modzzak

Under rights granted to the republics of the former Yugoslavia and with a strong mandate from the Croatian people, gained across two national referendums, Croatia declared its independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Yugoslavia was a multi-ethnic country, with each republic containing a mixture of different ethnicities and indeed many families which themselves were the product of mixed ethnicities. Ethnic tensions and the rise of strong nationalist political voices in each of the former republics and within certain regions of these countries lead to a situation where war became inevitable. The worst of the fighting was suffered within Croatia, Bosnia, and Herzegovina and the part of southern Serbia which is now Kosovo. The Croatian War of Independence (known locally as the Homeland War) lasted from 1991 – 1995. The Yugoslav wars of which it was a major part is regarded as the deadliest conflict in Europe since World War II. In many cases, this war pitted neighbouring houses or neighbouring villages against each other and sometimes members of the same family could be found on opposing sides. The war left huge damage on the country and its infrastructure, some of which is still visible. Worse still, it had a much greater physical and psychological impact on the population. Some people in Croatia today would rather not talk about the war and would prefer to instead talk about the country's present and future. For other people in Croatia, the war remains something of an obsession. If you are curious about the Croatian War of Independence, it is not advisable to bring it up in conversation when you visit the country unless you know the person you are speaking with extremely well. It is a sensitive subject for many and can unnecessarily provoke strong emotions and painful memories. There are many resources online where you can instead read all about the war, there are good documentary series about it on Youtube and there are several museums in Croatia where you can go and learn more, in Vukovar, Karlovac and in Zagreb.

6) Wine


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What is Croatia famous for? Its wine is some of the best you'll ever try © Plenković

Croatia is not really that famous for wine. Well, not as famous as it should be because Croatia makes some of the greatest wine on the planet. Croatian wine is only really famous to those who have tried it after visiting – you'll never forget it! A growing cabal of Croatian wine enthusiasts are trying their best internationally to spread the word about Croatian wine. However, there isn't really that much space in Croatia to make all the wine it needs to supply its homegrown demands and a greatly increased export market. Therefore, export prices of Croatian wine are quite high and even when it does reach foreign shores, these prices ensure its appreciation only by a select few. There's a popular saying locally that goes something like this “We have enough for ourselves and our guests”. Nevertheless, Croatian wine is frequently awarded at the most prestigious international competitions and expos. White wine, red wine, sparkling wine, cuvee (mixed) and rose wine are all made here and Croatia truly excels at making each. You can find different kinds of grape grown and wine produced in the different regions of Croatia. The best way to learn about Croatian wine is to ask someone who really knows about wine or simply come to Croatia to try it. Or, perhaps better still, don't do that and then there will be more for those of us who live here. Cheers!

7) Croatian produce


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Drniš prsut
is protected at a European level, one of 32 products currently protected in this way and therefore what is Croatia famous for © Tourist Board of Drniš

To date, 32 agricultural and food products from Croatia have attained protection at a European level. These range from different prosciuttos, olive oils and Dalmatian bacon, to pastries and pastas, honey, cheese, turkeys, lamb, cabbages, mandarins, salt, sausages, potatoes and something called Meso 'z tiblice (which took a friend from the region where it's made three days to fully research so he could explain it to me at the levels necessary to write an informed article about it – so, you can research that one online). While some prosciutto, bacon, sausages, olive oil and wine do make it out of Croatia, much of these are snaffled up by a discerning few of those-in-the-know. The rest, you will only really be able to try if you visit. And, there are many other items of Croatian produce which are known which you can also try while here

Truffles


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What is Croatia known for? Truffles © Donatella Paukovic

By weight, one of the most expensive delicacies in the world, truffles are a famous part of the cuisine within some regions of Croatia. They feature heavily in the menu of Istria, which is well known as a region in which both white and black truffles are found and then added to food, oils or other products. Truth be told, this isn't a black and white issue - there are a great number of different types of truffle and they can be found over many different regions in Croatia, including around Zagreb and in Zagreb County. But, you'll need to see a man about a dog if you want to find them yourself.

Vegeta


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What is Croatia known for? Vegeta

Having celebrated its 60th birthday in 2019, the cooking condiment Vegeta is exported and known in many other countries, particularly Croatia's close neighbours. It is popularly put into soups and stews to give them more flavour. Among its ingredients are small pieces of dehydrated vegetables like carrot, parsnip, onion, celery, plus spices, salt and herbs like parsley.

Chocolate


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What is Croatia known for? Chocolate is a big export© Alexander Stein

Though making chocolate is only around a century old in Croatia, Croatian chocolate has grown to become one of its leading manufactured food exports. Some of the most popular bars may be a little heavy on sugar and low on cocoa for more discerning tastes. But, lots of others really like it.

Beer


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What is Croatia famous for? Its beer is becoming more famous internationally © The Garden Brewery

The exploding growth of the Croatian craft ale scene over the last 10 years is something that is likely to have passed you by, unless you're a regular visitor to the country, a beer buff or both. Most of the producers are quite small and production not great enough to make a big splash on international markets. However, even within a craft-flooded current market, Croatian beer is becoming more widely known – in one poll, the Zagreb-based Garden Brewery was in 2020 voted Europe's Best Brewery for the second consecutive year

8) Innovation


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What is Croatia famous for? Pioneers, inventors and innovation. Nikola Tesla was born here

From the parachute, fingerprinting, the retractable pen and the tungsten filament electric light-bulb to the torpedo, modern seismology, the World Health Oganisation and the cravat (a necktie, and the precursor to the tie worn by many today), Croatia has gifted many innovations to the world. The list of pioneers - scientists, artists, researchers and inventors - who were born here throughout history is long. And, although innovation is not currently regarded as experiencing a golden period in Croatia, there are still some Croatian innovators whose impact is felt globally, such as electric hypercar maker Mate Rimac.

9) Being poor


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What is Croatia famous for? Being poor. Yikes!

The minimum wage in Croatia is among the lowest in Europe. Croatian language media is constantly filled with stories about corruption. There is a huge state apparatus in which key (if not most) positions are regarded to be politically or personally-motivated appointments. This leads to a lack of opportunity for Croatia's highly educated young people. Many emigrate for better pay and better opportunities. This leads to a brain drain and affects the country's demographics considerably (if it usually the best educated, the ablest and the youngest Croatian adults who emigrate). Many of those who stay are influenced by the stories of widespread corruption and lack of opportunity and are therefore lethargic in their work, leading to a lack of productivity. A considerable part of the Croatian economy is based on tourism which remains largely seasonal.

10) People want to live in Croatia


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What is Croatia famous for? People want to come and live here. No, really.

Yes, despite many younger Croatians leaving or dreaming of leaving and despite the low wages, many people who are not from Croatia dream about living here. Of course, it's an all too familiar scenario that you go on holiday somewhere and while sitting at a seafood restaurant in sight of a glorious sunset, having had a few too many glasses of the local wine, you fall in love with Miguel or however the waiter is called who served it and Miguel's homeland. But, with Croatia, this is actually no passing fancy, no idle holiday dream. People do decide to move here. And not just for the sunset and Miguel (nobody in Croatia is called Miguel - Ed).

Croatia may be known for being poor, but it also has one of the best lifestyles in Europe. That it's cafe terraces are usually full to capacity tells you something about the work to living ratio. Croatians are not just spectators of sport, many enjoy a healthy lifestyle. This informs everything from their pastimes to their diet. There are great facilities for exercise and sport, wonderful nature close by whichever part of the country you're in. You can escape into somewhere wonderful and unknown at a moment's notice. The country is well connected internally by brilliant roads and motorways, reliable intercity buses and an international train network. The tourism industry ensures that multiple airports across Croatia can connect you to almost anywhere you want to go, and major international airports in Belgrade and Budapest, just a couple of hours away, fly to some extremely exotic locations. There are a wealth of fascinating neighbour countries on your doorstep to explore on a day trip or weekend and superfast broadband is being rolled out over the entire country. This is perhaps one of the reasons Croatia has been heralded as one of the world's best options for Digital Nomads. In a few years, when we ask what is Croatia famous far, they could be one of the answers.

What is Croatia famous for, but only after you've visited

Some things you experience when you visit Croatia come as a complete surprise. Most would simply never be aware of them until they visit. They are usually top of the list of things you want to do when you come back to Croatia.

Gastronomy


fritaja_sparoge_1-maja-danica-pecanic_1600x900ntbbbbb.jpgGastronomy is only one of the things what is Croatia known for only after you've visited © Maja Danica Pecanic / Croatian National Tourist Board

Despite a few famous TV chefs having visited and filmed in Croatia over the years, Croatian gastronomy remains largely unknown to almost everyone who's never been to Croatia. That's a shame because you can find some fine food here. Croatia has increased its Michelin-starred and Michelin-recommended restaurants tenfold over recent years. But, perhaps the bigger story is the traditional cuisine which varies greatly within the countries different regions. From the gut-busting barbecue grills and the classic Mediterranean fare of Dalmatia to the pasta, asparagus and truffles of Istria to the sausages and paprika-rich stews of Slavonia and the best smoked and preserved meats of the region, there's an untold amount of secret Croatian gastronomy to discover.

Coffee


restaurant-3815076_1280.jpgWhat is Croatia known for? Well, to locals, it's famous for coffee - not just a drink, it's a ritual

Croatians are passionate about coffee and about going for coffee. It's a beloved ritual here. Going for coffee in Croatia is often about much more than having coffee. It's an integral part of socialising, catching up and sometimes being seen. It doesn't always involve coffee either. Sometimes, you'll be invited for coffee, only to end up ordering beer. It's not about the coffee. Although, the standard of coffee in Croatia, and the places where you drink it, is usually really good.

The misapprehension: What is Croatia known for (if you are a Croatian living in Croatia)

Handball, music

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Thursday, 11 February 2021

PHOTOS: Outstanding Contemporary Croatian Architecture of the Year

February 10, 2021 – 10 of the most outstanding examples of contemporary Croatian architecture have been selected by the Association of Croatian Architects to compete in the extremely prestigious Mies van der Rohe Awards. Held only once every two years, they are the European equivalent of the Pritzker Prize for Architecture.

The Mies van der Rohe Awards are a really big deal. The greatest works of European architecture compete for recognition in the competition. The greatest success of Croatian architecture in the awards was attained by UP studios' Toma Plejić and Lea Pelivan, who received a special award for upcoming architects and had their high school in Koprivnica named the best building in that category in 2009. The success has had a considerable impact on their careers since.

Being held only once every two years, Croatian architecture projects completed since the closure of entries for the 2019 awards are eligible to be submitted. Here are the outstanding examples of contemporary Croatian architecture that will represent the country in 2022.

Cinema Urania Zagreb
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An old neighbourhood cinema built into the back streets near Kvatric. In their redesign, 3LHD preserved the best features from this early example of concrete engineering in Croatian architecture. They added a glass pavilion at the entrance, atriums and skylights, flooding the former darkness with the natural light needed for its new purpose as an event and work space.

3LHD_264_Urania_photo_by_Jure_Zivkovic_622355555555.jpg© Jure Živković

Grand Park Hotel, Rovinj
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Sprawling widely across six stepped levels, the new luxury Grand Park Hotel and spa could easily have looked a long swipe of concrete. But, by places greenery on each of its staged roofs, architects 3LHD have ensured that no matter where you are in the 500-guest-capacity building, your view places you within a garden, looking out onto Rovinj Old Town and the expanse of the Adriatic. Croatian architecture at its most breathtaking.

Grand_Park_Hotel_Rovinj43333.jpg© Alukoenigstahl hr
Ivanja Reka Elementary School, south Sesvete, east Zagreb
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If every elementary school looked as pretty and was as well equipped as Ivanja Reka Elementary School in the south of Sesvete, eastern Zagreb, you could well believe daily attendance would never drop below 100%. Designed by a team of architectural authors (SUBMAP studios Marija Burmas and Ivo-Lola Petrić, and Jakša Kalajžić from JKA Arhitekti), the multi-level main building sits centrally, surrounded by sports, recreation and other facilities creating an impressive view for both those outside and within.

a3a8dd73fd11ef837e65386313eb8c6529c4b842blaz.jpeg© Ivanja Reka Elementary School / Domagoj Blažević

Roxanich Wine & Heritage Hotel, Motovun, Istria
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The view is unmistakably Istria. Vineyards carpet the land below and - rising above - the picturesque hilltop town of Motovun. Helmed architecturally by consistently bold Rijeka designer Idis Turato, this multi-level, multi-purpose redesign retains the traditional feel of its existing stone building and its purpose – there's a huge wine cellar beneath – but has opened up the space to give stunning views, not least over a sun deck that spectacularly reflects the sunrise and sunset. This is an active winery, with works and equipment all housed within its lower floors, not that you could tell from the 25 person capacity boutique hotel, restaurant and wine shop upstairs.

317b6f_Wine-and-Heritage-Hotel-Roxanich---Motovun5.jpg© Roxanich.hr

Four Houses for Four Brothers, Diklo, Zadar
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Judging from a theme of project titles used by architects Iva Letilović and Igor Pedišić, we're not sure that Four Houses for Four Brothers was actually commissioned by four brothers or that four live there. But, you could well believe they could. The ultra-modern set of independent houses, located next to a beautiful stretch of coast in a north Zadar neighbourhood, was specifically designed to address a distinctly Croatian reality – how to open up some of your dwelling to seasonal guests while you remain at home. The design separates the buildings clearly into separate quarters which allow privacy, comfort and minimal encroachment for both visitors and residents.

bazencetiri.jpg© Igor Pedišić

Galić Winery, Kutjevo
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Award-winning outfit Zagreb-based studio Dva arhitekta have an existing, jaw-dropping design for a rural winery commissioned by famous makers Galic. However, that project, as yet, remains unrealised. But, their winery for Galic in the centre of Kutjevo town is complete. Melding the traditional and the contemporary, the upper section of the building is a bold and unblemished red brick, adorned with the winemaker's unmistakable logo. Beneath, concrete arches invite your eyes into the actual wine cellar – neat rows of barrels, protected behind glass walls that are set back from the facade. Brilliant!

8dammy.jpg© Damir Fabijanić

Seecel Centre, Zagreb
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Designed as a regional centre for the development of entrepreneurs and its construction costs generously part-funded by European money, the Seecel Centre arrived long overdue and does not house its intended inhabitants. Such matters are best left for different articles as, here, we're concerned with the undeniable finery of this building's architecture and appearance. Holding space for accommodation, offices, communal collaboration, education and presentations, the five-floored building uses ultra-modern building materials and construction methods to make it low-energy, its great blocks of covered concrete, with glass windows set further back, echoing old fortifications. It was designed by Igor Franić who, in Croatia, is perhaps best known for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb and completed by him and his team at SZA / Studio za arhitekturu d.o.o.

endGV7_1096-mindarklav.jpg© Site Project d.o.o.

Trg Poljana, Šibenik
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Not a small amount was asked of project architects Atelier Minerva from Dubrovnik in the task to create Trg Poljana in Šibenik. The site had long been earmarked for a much-needed, official town square – a place for events and public gatherings. But, the town was also woefully short on parking. By burying a multi-level car park beneath the open space, the architects successfully met both demands. Triangular shapes sit at an angle above shaded seating, echoing the inclines on the roof of the Juraj Šižgorić City Library opposite. Clever.

Poljana-Sibenik-Eccos-inzenjering-1-compressed-scaled.jpg© Ervin Husedžinović / Eccos-inzenjering

Homestead on Hartovski vrh, Žumberak, Zagreb County
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A collection of multi-purpose rural buildings, Homestead and Meditation Centre on Hartovski vrh was commissioned and designed for use by the Buddhist Center Zagreb. Their aim was to relocate activities such as chan, yoga, meditation, healthy living and teaching to a peaceful retreat outside of the city. Architects Branimir Rajčić and Mariela Žinić began the project in 2015, with the completed site arriving in 2019. Modern building materials are used, but not so the striking collection seems out of place within a partially agricultural setting. The set of buildings includes a residential dwelling and a larger hall for meetings and activities, both of which use large windows to allow the light and nature to flood in.

6_3BERCFUINAL.jpg© Robert Leš

Square of Traditional Crafts, Varaždin
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A tricky task was given to architects Studio Konntra – how to enliven and modernise a traditional old square in the centre of one of Europe's best-preserved Baroque Old Towns. They did this by constructing transportable kiosks to house small outlets for local artists and craftsmen that cater to visiting tourists who come to the square. When occupied during the day, the plain wooden interiors allows the crafts to take centre stage. But, after closing time, the outsides of the wooden doors are brightly coloured and adorned with paintings, a welcoming environment for residents to use at night.

sqaureee23455.jpeg© Studio Konntra

Wednesday, 10 February 2021

Croatian Pioneers and Inventors: Croats Who Changed the World

February 10, 2021 –For a relatively small country, Croatia punches above its weight in terms of global impact. Croatian pioneers, inventors and artists have changed the lives of millions and the world in which they live. Here are just a few of them

For a relatively small country, Croatia punches above its weight in terms of global impact. And, no, this time we're not talking about football or olive oil. Croatian pioneers, inventors and artists have changed the lives of millions and the world in which they live. Now, a new exhibition is about to open in Zagreb which collects Croatian pioneers together in just tribute.

'Croatia to the World' is the title of the exhibition and it looks at not only Croatian pioneers and inventors but also prominent scientists, artists, writers and researchers. The exhibition, which is jointly organised by the Croatian media title Večernji list, opens on February 12 in Zagreb's Meštrović Pavilion, otherwise known as the House of Croatian Artists. 1500 exhibits demonstrate the ingenuity and achievements of Croatian pioneers, with each accompanied by text that tells you about the individuals and the significance of their work.

Ranging from household names to the unjustly overlooked, here are some of the Croatian pioneers from the exhibition who have changed the world.

Croatian pioneers who changed the world

Ruđer Bošković

rudjer-boskovic.jpgRuđer Bošković (1711 – 1787) © Zagreb City Libraries

It's difficult to imagine the mind Dubrovnik-born polymath Ruđer Bošković was blessed with. He was a physicist, astronomer, mathematician, engineer, writer, philosopher, diplomat, poet, theologian and also became a Jesuit priest. Perhaps today remembered best for his visionary predictions in the realms of physics - including the idea of the relativity of space and time and the constant speed of light - and his lasting discoveries in the field of astronomy, the most trivial of which is perhaps the easiest to explain (he discovered the absence of atmosphere on the Moon) in his time, he was famed across Europe for much more besides. The world-famous Ruđer Bošković Institute in Zagreb, Croatia's largest institute of natural sciences and technology, now stands as a permanent testament to him and his achievements.

Josip Belušić

1584015909josip_belusic.jpgJosip Belušić (1847 - 1905) © Public domain

An Istrian-born inventor, Josip Belušić's best-known creation is the speedometer, which instantaneously informs the speed of the vehicle in which you're travelling. His invention was installed in every motorised vehicle manufactured thereafter, including motorbikes, boats and cars.

Faust Vrančić

FaustVRANCIC123.jpgFaust Vrančić (circa 1551 – 1617) © Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography

Born into a well-connected family, it is not possible to attribute Faust Vrančić's breadth of vision solely to a privileged youth and education. His documented imaginings and inventions extended to water, wind and solar energy, mill workings, agricultural machinery, the building of bridges and a forerunner of the parachute which, while later than Leonardo da Vinci's sketchings, is believed to have been the first to have actually been built and tested. A memorial centre on the protected island of Prvić, near his birthplace of Šibenik, is a great place to learn more about him.

Ivan Blaž Lupis Vukić

Luppis-Johannrijek.jpgIvan Blaž Lupis Vukić (1813 – 1875) © Prirodoslovna i grafička škola Rijeka

The great Croatian city of Rijeka had a big part to play in the era of modern Naval warfare, not least for Croatian pioneers developing the torpedo there. Ivan Blaž Lupis Vukić headed a commission to develop the first prototypes of the self-propelled torpedo, perfecting early designs with the help of English engineer Robert Whitehead (from Bolton, near Manchester - the writer of this article went to school with his descendants - Ed).

Antun Lučić

Anthony_F._Lucas1.jpgAntun Lučić (1855 – 1921) © Public domain

Born in Split but raised further up the Adriatic coast in Trieste, after completing his studies in engineering, Antun Lučić must have imagined he might forever apply these skills on the Adriatic ships he subsequently sailed on as a member of the Austro-Hungarian navy. But, his destiny lay elsewhere. Something persuaded him to stay on for longer while he was visiting his uncle near Detroit, Michigan. The Great Lakes which lay just ten kilometres to his north are so vast, perhaps they reminded him of the Adriatic and he felt at home? He scored a job in a local sawmill, but he couldn't suppress his engineer's instinct and set about improving their saw machinery. It was perhaps his success in doing so that persuaded him to return to more engineering-based endeavours. He went to work as a mechanical engineer in the mining industry, in which he stayed for 13 years. He ended up working for a salt mining company. By this time he'd learned the relationship between salt deposits, sulphur, natural gas, and oil deposits so, when he visited the Sour Spring Mound, south of Beaumont, Texas in 1899, instinct told him that something worth drilling for lay beneath this distinct topography. He was right. It took a fair amount of begging and borrowing to attain the funds required to drill to the necessary 347 metres but, on 10 January 1901, mud and water erupted from the drill hole, followed by a stream of crude oil that reached 46 metres into the air. The eruption lasted nine days, flowing between 70,000 and 100,000 barrels per day, before finally being brought under control. The significance of his work cannot be overstated. As well as the many innovations he constructed specifically for this kind of drilling and capping, Lučić is considered to be the founder of modern petroleum reservoir engineering. He helped revolutionize world fuel use, transformed the economy of southeast Texas, made the automobile a viable, widespread transport option and made the city of Houston the centre of an American oil industry, which thereafter surpassed Russia as the world's leading producer. Lučić subsequently served as the lifelong chairman of the American Committee for Oil and Gas.

Saint Jerome

1754px-Italian_Emilian_-_St_Jerome_in_Penitence_-_Google_Art_Project.jpgSaint Jerome In Penitence © Dulwich Picture Library. Saint Jerome lived circa 342/347 – 420

Born on the borders of the Roman provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia, Jerome of Stridon was a priest and writer who is best known for his translation of most of the Bible from Hebrew into Latin. It took him some 20 years to complete and he went to live in the region once known as Judea (today's Israel) in order to fully learn the language. Beyond any religious reference, his work still shapes the laws, customs and culture of the European continent today - much of its construction has its foundations in his Bible translation and commentary.

Nikola Tesla

AnyConv.com__N.Tesla_1.jpgNikola Tesla (1856 – 1943) © Public domain

Arguably the most famous of all Croatian pioneers, Tesla was an inventor and hugely innovative engineer who applied his visionary mind to the fields of early x-rays, wireless power supply, electromagnetic radiation, radio waves and much, much more. However, he is best known for pioneering the alternating current (AC) electricity supply system by which electricity is safely distributed to every home, street and business to this day. Over 130 streets are named after him in Croatia.

Herman Potočnik Noordung

Herman_Potocnik_Noordung.jpgHerman Potočnik (1892 – 1929) © Public domain

Often eclipsed in modern memory by the achievements of the American space programme, the first astronaut in space was actually Russian Yuri Gagarin . He completed one orbit of Earth on 12 April 1961. Yet his achievements perhaps help eclipse that of a Pula-born Croatian pioneer who was concerned with space travel some three decades earlier. Way back in 1928, Herman Potočnik Noordung published his sole book, Das Problem der Befahrung des Weltraums - der Roketen-Motor (The Problem of Space Travel - The Rocket Motor) in which, over 188 pages and 100 handmade illustrations, Potočnik set out a plan for a breakthrough into space and the establishment of a permanent human presence there. He conceived a detailed design for a space station, regarded by Russian and American historians of space flight to be the first architecture in space, described the potential use of orbiting spacecraft for detailed observation of the ground and how the special conditions of space could be useful for scientific experiments.

Andrija Štampar

AndrijaStampar1.jpgAndrija Štampar (1888 – 1958) © Štampar

Nothing short of a genius, Andrija Štampar was a selfless proponent and pioneer of public health. He ignored class, conventions and ruling regimes in order to benefit the health of millions of everyday people, all over the world, and insisted that anyone holding the position of doctor should do the same. He was imprisoned more than once for his efforts but, undeterred, pursued a path of education and reform, helped to form the World Health Organisation and saved millions of lives.

Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić

Ivana_brlic_mazuranic_II.jpgIvana Brlić-Mažuranić (1874 – 1938) © Public domain

Both born and married into families within the upper echelons of Croatian society, Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić is regarded as Croatia's greatest writer for children. Though written over a century ago, her books like 'The Brave Adventures of Lapitch' (Čudnovate zgode šegrta Hlapića) and 'Croatian Tales of Long Ago' (Priče iz davnine) still remain popular. In the latter, she invented fantastical fairytales that referenced ancient folklore, earning her comparisons to Hans Christian Andersen. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature no less than four times and was the first female to enter what is today the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

Benedikt Kotruljević

Benedikt_Koturljevic.jpgStatue of Benedikt Kotruljević in Zagreb © Suradnik13. He lived 1416 – 1469

The double-entry bookkeeping system described first by 15th-century merchant, economist, scientist, diplomat and humanist Benedikt Kotruljević remains integral to modern accounting.

Andrija Mohorovičić

AndrijaMihlvc.jpegAndrija Mohorovičić (1857 – 1936) © Davorka Herak and Marijan Herak

No less than the founder of modern seismology, Andrija Mohorovičić was the first person to establish that the geologically alive Earth is covered with large plates whose movement and collision are the cause of earthquakes. He determined the thickness of the Earth's crust and predicted the effects of earthquakes on buildings, as well as working within the areas of meteorology and climatology. He founded the Meteorological Observatory in Zagreb, which remains internationally significant in seismic measurements.

Ivo Andrić

AnyConv.com__1739px-S._Kragujevic_Andric_na_vest_o_N._nagradi_1961.jpgIvo Andrić and his wife in 1961, upon hearing he had been awarded the Nobel Prize of Literature © Stevan Kragujević

In his best works 'Travnička kronika' and 'Na Drini ćuprija', Ivo Andrić (1892 – 1975) offered staggering depictions of the lives of his multi-ethnic countrymen in Bosnia under Ottoman rule. No stranger himself to the volatile changing of regimes in the Balkans, he wrote them while confined to an apartment in Nazi-occupied Belgrade, which today exists a museum in his honour. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1961, having been chosen over the likes of J. R. R. Tolkien, John Steinbeck and E. M. Forster. He donated the entire prize money to the purchase of books for libraries in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Julije Klović

Julije_Klovic_2.jpgPortrait of Julije Klović by El Greco © Public domain. He lived 1498 – 1578

The making of a great book was a much more laboured and careful undertaking in the 16th century, their pages adorned not only with text but vivid ornamental decorations, known as illuminations. Julije Klović's were the greatest of them all. He was the foremost illuminator of the Italian High Renaissance, and arguably the last very notable artist to work within this long tradition. His now priceless works exist in some of the world's most prestigious museums, although an impressive number were brought to Zagreb in 2012 for an exhibition at the famous Klovićevi Dvori gallery, which is named after him.

Marko Marulić

Marko_Marulic_Zagreb.jpgStatue of Marko Marulić in Zagreb © Suradnik13

Born into an aristocratic Dalmatian family, Marko Marulić (1450 – 1524) is today revered in Croatia as the father of the Croatian renaissance, one of the first writers to describe his language as Croatian and something of a national poet. His achievements do actually extend beyond the national obsession – his Christianity-informed writings on humanist and ethical matters were largely produced in Latin and subsequently translated into many languages. His use of the word 'psychology' is the oldest known in literature.

Ivan Meštrović

600-biografija-753-Kopirajmestro.pngIvan Meštrović (1883 – 1962) © Archive of the Ivan Meštrović Museum

The pre-eminent sculptor of his era, you genuinely need to be in the actual presence of Drnis-born Meštrović's major works to understand them. They do not live solitary existences. Instead, they inhabit the space around them, creating indelible memories of time and place. In doing so, his globally famous works help define the cities of Split, Chicago, Belgrade and Zagreb. Incredible!

Marco Polo

Marco_Polo_Mosaic_from_Palazzo_Tursi.jpgMosaic of Marco Polo displayed in the Palazzo Doria-Tursi, Genoa © Public domain. He lived 1254 – 1324

In the age of television and the internet, it's difficult to imagine parts of the world being completely unknown. But, at the time of Korčula-born Marco Polo's travels and subsequent writings, that's exactly what China and the Far East were to the inhabitants of Europe. His book, 'The Travels of Marco Polo' shockingly revealed these lands and their people to a fascinated European populace. Collated over 24 years of life and exploration in the East, the details of his travels helped join these two continents together and the book became the third most translated in the world, after the Bible and the Qur'an.

Gjuro Armeno Baglivi

1525px-Portret_van_Giorgio_Baglivi_op_34-jarige_leeftijd_Georgius_Baglius_aetat._34_titel_op_object_RP-P-1909-5657.jpgPortrait of Gjuro Armeno Baglivi © Public domain

Gjuro Armeno Baglivi (1668 – 1707) was a scientist and physician who helped drag physicians' knowledge of the workings of the human body (and treatment of illness) away from ridiculous, near-baseless assumptions that had existed from the times of Ancient Greece right up until the 17th century. His correct identification that the inner organs were more crucial to functioning health, rather than the nature of the fluids they produced, lead to an early era of human biological understanding that was the first to be based on a scientific observation comparable to that of today.

David Schwarz

HE9_1061scwarz.jpg David Schwarz (1850 – 1897) © Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography

Raised in Županja, Slavonia, David Schwarz was a woodcutter whose own curiosity and problem-solving instincts lead him towards engineering pursuits. Completely self-taught, he successfully set about redesigning woodcutting machinery and thereafter became interested in mechanics and technology. In a rather bold leap, he turned his interest to airships and designed a radical new ship with a rigid envelope made entirely of a relatively new building material - the lightweight metal aluminum. Realisation of the project nearly bankrupted his woodcutting business and made him a laughing stock, but the project eventually got the funding it needed and, after two unsatisfactory models had been tried, Schwarz's airship was successfully flown in Germany, although not until several months after Schwarz had sadly died. Industrialist Carl Berg, who had both funded the project and supplied the aluminum, went on to provide aluminum parts and expertise from the project in the building of Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's similarly rigid airships.

Marcel Kiepach

marcel_kiepach_1krz.jpgMarcel Kiepach (1894 - 1915) © krizevci eu

Marcel Kiepach died a soldier on the Russian front in 1915 at the age of just 21. Though all who knew him are surely now also dead, the loss of this young Križevci-born man lingers, because you can't help but think what might have been. Kiepach was a child prodigy. As a boy of just sixteen, he patented a maritime compass that indicates north regardless of the presence of iron or magnetic forces and an improved version in 1911. He patented a dynamo for vehicle lighting that generated power from the mechanical drive of the vehicle itself, which was thereafter used on both cars and bicycles, and he also patented a power switch. Who knows what innovations this youngest of Croatian pioneers would have brought to the world had his life not been cut so short?

Ivan Vučetić

HTE_0823vuketic.jpgIvan Vučetić (1858 – 1925) © Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography

Ivan Vučetić pioneered the use of forensics in law enforcement, specifically fingerprinting. He greatly expanded on previously established ideas in order to make the first positive identification of a criminal in a case, correctly identifying a murderer from a fingerprint left at the scene.

Slavoljub Eduard Penkala

hbl9032penkala.jpgSlavoljub Eduard Penkala (1871 – 1922), one of the Croatian pioneers whose work changed everyday lives © Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography

Naturalised Croat Slavoljub Eduard Penkala was an inventor who, at the time of his death, held 80 patents to his name, including ones for a hot water bottle, a rail-car brake and an anode battery. However, it is for his innovations with pens and pencils for which he is best remembered. He further developed pre-existing ideas for the retractable/mechanical pencil and the first solid-ink fountain pen. One of the Croatian pioneers able to transform his innovations into a successful business, his company TOZ Penkala still operates in Zagreb today – although it's not where we originally get the word 'pen' from, the company and founder's name played a part in this name maintaining its popularised standing.

Franjo Hanaman

Dr._Just_Sándor_és_Hanaman_Ferenc.jpgFranjo Hanaman (seated) and Alexander Just © Public domain

Of all of the Croatian pioneers who changed the world, the biography of Franjo Hanaman (1878 - 1941) is frequently written as the shortest. And yet, you can see his chief innovation inside almost every room you walk into. Franjo Hanaman, from Drenovci, Slavonia, invented the world's first tungsten filament electric light-bulb. The invention was also applied in improving early diodes and triodes. Sometimes it takes just one bright idea to guarantee your place in history...

Lavoslav Ružička and Vladimir Prelog

Lavoslav_Ružićka_1939.jpgLavoslav Ružička (1887 – 1976), one of the Croatian pioneers who won a Nobel Prize  © Nobel Foundation

Vukovar-born, Osijek-educated Lavoslav Ružička was a chemist whose work had wide-reaching implications over several sectors of society. In his early career, his innovations were of benefit to the perfume industry. But, thanks to his lifelong devotion to education, he was drawn into another field. He became interested in steroids and sex hormones and secured his place as a giant in the world of pharmaceuticals with the first synthesis of testosterone. His laboratory thereafter became the world centre of organic chemistry and he was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1939. His greatest achievements in chemistry actually lay ten years further ahead, though these are nowhere near as easy to explain. He retired in 1957, turning his laboratory over to the younger Croat who for so many years he had mentored - Vladimir Prelog. So much more than a footnote within the story of Lavoslav Ružička, Vladimir Prelog's contributions to the world are also not easy to understand, nor explain as a layman, but he too received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He did so in 1975 for his research into the stereochemistry of organic molecules and reactions.

Vladimir_Prelog_ETH-Bib_Portr_00214.jpgVladimir Prelog  (1906 – 1998) © ETH Zurich

Total Croatia News would like to remind this is only a sample of the Croatian pioneers included in the exhibition. While the number of men included in the exhibition of Croatian pioneers does greatly exceed the number of women, more women are actually included in the exhibition than are represented in this short overview – notably from the fields of opera, ballet, art and photography

Thursday, 4 February 2021

HNL Round 19 Recap: Hajduk Tops Istra, Osijek Wins 3:0

February 4, 2021 - The 19th round of the Croatian First League was held mid-week, on February 2 and 3, 2021. In this round, Hajduk tops Istra, and Osijek records a 3:0 win against Slaven Belupo.

Osijek v. Slaven Belupo (3:0)

Osijek and Belupo opened the 19th round at City Garden Stadium on Tuesday, February 2, 2021.

Brlek opened the scoring spree for Osijek with a goal just before the whistle blew for halftime (45+3'). A quick goal to start the second half by Zaper made it 2:0 in the 52nd minute, and 3:0 in the 55th minute thanks to Bohar. 

 

Osijek is currently in 2nd place with 42 points, while Belupo is in 6th place with 20. 

Dinamo v. Lokomotiva (2:0)

Dinamo and Lokomotiva met for the Zagreb derby on Tuesday, February 2, 2021, at Masksimir Stadium. 

Gavranovic scored an early goal for Dinamo in the 9th minute for the 1:0 lead, which was the score at the half. Atiemwen increased Dinamo's lead to 2:0 in the 64th minute, which was the final result.

 

Dinamo is currently in 1st place with 42 points, while Lokomotiva is in 9th with 15. 

Varazdin v. Gorica (2:1)

Varazdin and Gorica met in Varazdin on Wednesday, February 3, 2021. 

While Gorica had the lead going into the first half thanks to a goal by Lovric (0:1), Obregon equalized for Varazdin in the 76th minute, and in the 90th minute, Boban gave Varazdin the lead and ultimately the 2:1 win.

 

Varazdin is currently in 8th place with 18 points, while Gorica is in 3rd with 33. 

Rijeka v. Sibenik (2:2)

Rijeka and Sibenik met at Rujevica Stadium on Wednesday, February 3, 2021. 

Sibenik shocked Rijeka with two goals in the 27th and 32nd minutes by Sahiti and Juric. Pavicic scored for Rijeka in the 35th to make it 1:2. 

It was until the final minutes of the match when VAR ultimately ruled in Rijeka's favor, and after an 11-minute ordeal, Rijeka was awarded a penalty, which Andrijasevic scored for 2:2 (90+10'). 

 

Rijeka is currently in 4th place with 27 points, while Sibenik is in 7th with 20. 

Hajduk v. Istra 1961 (1:0)

Hajduk and Istra closed out the 19th round at Poljud Stadium on Wednesday, February 3, 2021. 

The only goal of the game came in the 16th minute when Nayir scored for Hajduk. The same player, unfortunately, missed a penalty 10 minutes later to increase Hajduk's lead. 

 

Hajduk is currently in 5th place with 23 points, while Istra is in the last place with 13. 

You can see the full HNL table HERE.

To read more about sport in Croatia, follow TCN’s dedicated page.  

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