Thursday, 18 March 2021

Will Census Show More Than 149 Unpopulated Settlements?

ZAGREB, 18 March, 2021 - Croatia had 149 unpopulated settlements in the last population census ten years ago and there will likely be more in the upcoming one, it was said on Thursday at a meeting of the parliamentary environment and nature protection committee.

The committee debated a 2013-19 report on Croatia's territory which confirms that settlements in border and mountain regions continue to die out, while concentrating in central Croatia, including Zagreb.

The data were presented by Sunčana Habrun of the Physical Planning Ministry, including on planned construction and business zones.

Planned construction zones cover about 400,000 hectares, 7% of the state territory, and business- about 112,000 hectares, 2% of the state territory.

"Is that a lot? Little?" wondered Juro Brkan of the ruling HDZ.

Habrun said it was too much and that Croatia had more than enough construction zones. Those zones are "extensively" planned given Croatia's situation and demographic figures, she added.

She said it was up to local government to see how to fight off demands for expanding construction zones.

Rovinj has decided that it wants no more hospitality and tourism zones because they endanger sustainable tourism development, she said.

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Thursday, 13 December 2018

Croatian Demographic Picture: Cash for Birth in Least Populated Municipality

There can be no denying that Croatia's overall demographic picture is grim. An astonishing amount of people have left, mainly since the country's accession to the European Union, when borders ''opened'' and life was made easier for those seeking opportunities abroad, but also since before then. With an enormous number of Croats having fled the country, mainly from the overlooked continental and eastern areas, the already poor Croatian demographic picture is growing more and more bleak.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 13th of December, 2018, over the last six or seven years, all the first graders from the entire territory of the Levanjska Varoš municipality, with its 136 square kilometres, in which there are just nine settlements, will sit behind just three school desks, according to a depressing report on Croatia's continually worsening demographic crisis by Glas Slavonije.

The small number of children born in this part of Osijek-Baranja County this year offers no hope for this municipality, at least at the moment, and with very little room for optimism in expectations of its demographic recovery, other measures are being sought.

Cash for every birth is an incentive for many, as the aforementioned area is one of the least populated areas, the first association of which is one of ​​poor development, a small population, and one of the areas in the whole of the Republic of Croatia which is the most in need.

In Levanjska Varoš, there are currently less than 6.9 inhabitants per square kilometre. The last census, which was carried out back in 2011, stated that there are 1,250 inhabitants, but, according to the mayor Slavko Tidlačka, for a long time now there have been less than 1,000, about 950 people who live in one of the nine settlements.

Like the poor Croatian demographic picture in general, the prospects for many local villages in this area, as well as across the country as a whole, with a little more ''leg room'' in some areas, are still extremely bad.

Until recently, this municipality has been awarding parents a sum of 1,000 kuna for each newborn child, but now that amount has been significantly boosted. Last year's decision on the right to financial compensation for newborn children in the area was passed. According to the details of that move, parents are paid 2,000 kuna for their first and second child, 5,000 kuna for a third, and for the fourth and then every next child, as much as 10,000 kuna.

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Monday, 18 June 2018

Are You One Of The 180 People Leaving Croatia Today?

June 18, 2018 — Five years ago, I revealed my decision to leave New York City and move to Croatia. Now everyone's scrambling in the opposite direction.

Why?

Monday, 4 June 2018

Croatia's Demographic 'Crisis' Isn't That Bad

June 4, 2018 — It's actually much worse. Few Croats bother announcing their departure.

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