Friday, 27 May 2022

Pelješac Bridge Opening Confirmed for End of July

May 27, 2022 - Minister of the Sea, Transport, and Infrastructure Oleg Butković has confirmed that the Pelješac bridge opening will be at the end of July.

Most of the works on the access roads to the Pelješac Bridge are nearing completion. Minister Oleg Butković visited the bridge to confirm that everything was ready for the July opening, reports Dalmacija Danas.

Works on access roads are in full swing. However, everything will depend on July 13, when the technical inspection of access roads and connections with the bridge is scheduled. Then it will be known whether the access roads and the Pelješac bridge have a use permit. In that case, the bridge's grand opening would be in late July. The most distinguished guests from Croatia and the EU are expected at the opening.

Currently, the largest works are on access roads, more precisely at the Brijesta junction. New forces are constantly being brought in to finish everything on time. One of the major problems that emerged during the construction of access roads is the rage in prices on the global market, which has led to an increase in the cost of road connections in Croatia. It is estimated that there was a difference in costs of 100 to 150 million kuna.

"The bridge is finished; as far as access roads are concerned, we can say that at the end of July, we will open the Pelješac Bridge with part of the access roads, more precisely the second and third phases. The second phase goes from Duboka to Sparagović and the third phase from Sparagović to Prapratno. A total of 25 kilometers of roads. We still have eight kilometers of the Ston bypass and the connection to the state road D8, which should be completed by the end of the year," said Oleg Butković, Minister of the Sea, Transport, and Infrastructure.

"The contractors are working in challenging circumstances due to global market disturbances, but nothing will be called into question," the Minister said.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

Sunday, 15 May 2022

Peljesac Bridge Construction Still Ongoing as Season Approaches

May the 15th, 2022 - The tourist season is rapidly approaching, and Peljesac bridge construction works are still ongoing, with some final things to tie up and one or two issues to solve yet.

As Morski/Andrej Jelusic writes, the height of the summer season is just around the corner, and the largest road investment in all of Croatia, Peljesac Bridge, is still being constructed to a certain degree, despite numerous encouraging announcements. We'll be waiting until mid-July for the Peljesac bridge construction to be entirely completed and for the structure to be open to traffic, but that won't really be the end.

With the arrival of summer temperatures across Croatia, the tourist season has unofficially begun. Since the global coronavirus pandemic severely impeded global travel for two years, there was a fear that Croatian tourism would also continue to experience a real fiasco, writes net.hr.

Fortunately, that didn't happen. The reason is not some special campaign or vision of the Croatian Government but the country's very lucky position. More precisely, the fact that Croatia very close to large markets from where tourists came to us in previous years. The coronavirus pandemic has proven that people feel the safest when travelling by car, at least as far as this contagion is concerned. In other words, destinations to which people can drive on their own have benefited. Countries to which people usually fly suffered, and Dubrovnik, separated from the rest of Croatia by Bosnia and Herzegovina's only tiny piece of coastline (Neum), also suffered enormously.

Given the country's location and relatively good road network and connectivity, the past two summer tourist seasons have been better than expected. Road connectivity should be even better in the future, as well. The Istrian Y should get another lane, and the Ucka tunnel will be further improved. The most famous road project in the country is certainly the Peljesac Bridge construction, which will unite not only Croatian but EU territory, cutting out the BiH border crossing entirely.

The bridge will be there, but it will also be crowded...

Back in 2017, a tender was announced, and in 2018, Peljesac bridge construction began. The Republic of Croatia was granted 330m euros to finance 85 percent of the Peljesac bridge construction costs, and the bridge has been built by the China Road and Bridge Corporation, which made a bid of 2 billion kuna, with a construction deadline of 36 months.

The works were slowed down by the coronavirus pandemic, but in July 2021, the last segment of the bridge was installed, and it was announced that the end of works on the bridge could be expected by the end of the year. At the beginning of 2022, the asphalt and other such equipment were installed on the huge structure, and a test load of the bridge was performed, which is why 21 trucks weighing up to 40 tonnes arrived at the Peljesac bridge construction site.

The problem has been the access roads with several viaducts and tunnels. The biggest challenge was the 485-metre-long Ston Bridge. Its specificity is that it will connect two tunnels above the Ston Bay, Polakovica, which is 1242 metres long, and Supava, which is 1290 metres long. The bridge has five pillars and two abutments, and is 40 metres high.

Ston Bridge has now been connected, but there is still a lot of work to be done on that section. A concrete slab is now to be built, which could take about four months, so that sometime in the autumn, perhaps come October or November, these works might also be completed.

When will Peljesac bridge actually be opened?

Peljesac bridge has passed a technical inspection and will be opened along with 20 kilometres of access roads in July this year. The other 10 kilometres of access roads and the Ston bypass will be completed by the end of the year. There will be a total of 32 kilometres of new state road, of which 25 should be ready by July the 15th. Unofficial information as to when the bridge will be open to the public is mid-July this year. Minister of Transport Oleg Butkovic was a little more specific and announced the opening on July the 15th to the 17th.

According to the contract, the workers of the aforementioned Chinese contractor will remain on the construction site until the commissioning of the Peljesac bridge with its accompanying access roads and the complete demobilisation and arrangement of the Peljesac bridge construction site. The contractor of the access roads is the Austrian company Strabag.

The suspended bridge spans a total length of 2404 metres with six main pillars and thirteen spans of steel which are 72 to 285 metres long, and was designed by Marjan Pipenbacher from the Slovenian company Ponting at a height of 55 metres. This was due to a request from neighbouring Bosnia and Herzegovina so that the unimpeded passage of ships to Neum could be met.

For more, make sure to check out our lifestyle section.

Monday, 2 May 2022

Expect to be Able to Drive Across Peljesac Bridge at End of July!

May the 2nd, 2022 - Even though the company responsible for constructing the long awaited Peljesac bridge has been working day and night to get the massive project completed by the prescribed deadline, many of us thought the delays would just keep on rolling in for this gigantic Croatian and European Union project which will unite Croatian territory (the extreme south of Dalmatia and the rest of the country) to be completed.

It now seems that we can say with confidence that you'll finally be able to drive across the strategic project at the end of July this year.

Peljesac bridge, which will cut out the need for people driving to and from the extreme south of Dalmatia to cross into neighbouring Bosnia and Herzegovina and then back out again (more precisely through the town of Neum, that country's only piece of coastline), is often referred to as the most significant project since the declaration of Croatian independence.

As Morski writes, Peljesac Bridge is finally scheduled to open this July, along with most of the access roads which have been taking some time to get completed. An HRT team visited the site to look at what stage the works on the bridge were at and whether they were affected by the recent earthquakes in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which were most felt in the wider Dubrovnik area.

''According to the current plans and dynamics of the works, people will likely be able to drive across Peljesac bridge during the second half of July when the works on the access roads are completed,'' said Jeroslav Segedin, the project manager for the Peljesac Bridge - Croatian roads (Hrvatske ceste).

He added that the technical inspection of the bridge has been performed, and that some minor shortcomings were noticed, which have been eliminated over more recent days. As for the bridge itself as a construction, everything is completely finished now, he pointed out. He also referred to the most technically demanding part - the Ston bypass.

''The construction of the bridge near Ston has been set, welded, and now a concrete slab is set to be built. It is expected to take four months, so in October or November these works should also be completed,'' he said. Segedin said the recent earthquake in Bosnia and Herzegovina didn't affect Peljesac bridge or any of the ongoing works and finalisations.

''When calculating the load-bearing capacity and stability of the bridge structure, one of the parameters is the seismic load, which in this case was much higher than what the earthquake was. We were more worried about how the earthquake affected other facilities along the route - viaducts, the Ston bridge, tunnels, which are still in the construction phase and haven't yet been completed. Fortunately, no damage or indicators were noticed that would suggest that something unexpected may have happened with any of the above,'' concluded Segedin.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

Saturday, 16 April 2022

Pelješac Tradition Museum Opens Ahead of Tourist Season

April 16, 2022 - The Pelješac Tradition Museum exhibits a unique collection of amphorae, old tools, bread ovens, and 19th-century olive mills collected by the Mikulić family. 

An impressive collection of amphorae more than two thousand years old, grinders, barrels, brandy cauldrons, old tools, fireplaces, bread ovens, paintings of the Virgin Mary, patron saint of vineyards, saddles, and a 19th-century olive oil mill of the famous Dubrovnik family Sorkočević - are just some of the exhibits in the unique collection that Mikulić family members have been collecting for years.

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In order to tell a story about the tradition and beauty of life on Pelješac, they opened the "Pelješac Tradition Museum" as part of their famous boutique winery in the Postup wine-growing location of Mokalo. An experience for all the senses because the tour ends with a tasting of their top pošip and postup, among which Don Josip stands out.

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"Our son Antonio named our famous act as a sign of respect for his grandfather Josip, from whom he inherited his love for viticulture, winemaking, and olive production. We have been engaged in vine growing and winemaking for generations, as have many families on Pelješac. We dedicated this museum to them, the farmers of Pelješac. Our tour symbolically begins in front of a picture of grandfather Josip and grandson Antonio; the focus is on wine transported from Pelješac in amphorae in antiquity and until the middle of the last century in bellows on loads and mules in a caravan. We have shown all this in our Museum, and in the end, the impressions are best gathered with wine," points out Igor Mikulić, who realized his dream by opening the Pelješac Tradition Museum.

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He has been creating this rich collection for years, although most of the exhibits have been very well known in tourist and wine circles for generations owned by families. His son Antonio, daughter Adriana, and wife Sabina are also involved in the business.

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The new project opened before Easter, and they completed the rich offer ahead of the new tourist season. In addition to the unique Adriatic wine resort camp and glamping and the award-winning boutique winery in Mokalo, they own the luxury heritage hotel Adriatic with a beautiful la carte restaurant.

All photos by Boutique vinarija Mikulić

For more, check out our lifestyle section.

Friday, 8 April 2022

Omiš Bypass Project One of Croatia's Highest Priorities

April 8, 2022 - Minister of the Sea, Transport, and Infrastructure Oleg Butković spoke for HRT about major transport infrastructure projects in Croatia that are underway and plans for the future. He especially commented on the Pelješac Bridge and the Omiš bypass.

"We do not have the exact date of the Pelješac Bridge opening yet, but everything is going well. The bridge is finished, and we are now concentrating on the access roads. As for the bridge itself, the procedure is more about documentation, and access roads are being worked on in a hurry. We expect the opening of the Pelješac Bridge and part of the access roads in mid-July. This year we will witness a massive event. It is a large infrastructure project, the most important because it is about merging the state territory," said Butković.

"I must be satisfied because despite COVID-19 and all the recent events, major infrastructure projects, including the Pelješac Bridge, were built at a good pace, so there were no delays," he said.

The opening of part of the access roads will cover a little more than 12 km, but the completion includes the Ston bypass and the Ston bridge, which should be completed by the end of this year. However, Butković added that there were some delays in that part due to unforeseen circumstances.

"By the end of the year, we will connect southern Dalmatia, which includes the Pelješac Bridge, 30 km of access roads with the Ston Bridge, and a large project, which is impressive with a 500 m across Ston Bay."

A specific opening date for the bridge with part of the access roads will be known in May, and the opening will be sometime in July.

"The Omiš bypass project is also being done. Last year we broke through the Komorjak tunnel; now, the bridge over the Cetina is slowly springing up. I toured it about ten days ago, the view from the bridge is really impressive. It is one of the most impressive projects, and it is complex because there are big bridges and tunnels. The Omiš Bypass project will be completed in a year and a half at this stage, but we must solve the entire multimodal platform," said the Minister of Transport.

Butković pointed out that the biggest traffic problems are in that part of Croatia. The 50,000 vehicles a day on the existing old D8 highway from Split to Omiš in the summer and through Omiš is simply unsustainable, he says. 

"I would say that the construction of the Omiš bypass is one of the highest priorities in Croatia today. The completion of its construction will be financed in the next financial perspective. We have confirmed from the European Commission that the entire multimodal platform from Solin, Split to Omiš will be financed with European funds. Croatian Roads is also preparing the project's next phases," he said.

He added that the Ministry would announce a tender for the section from Omiš to Dugi Rat by the end of this year.

"We recently visited the Omiš port, one of the largest port infrastructure projects in Croatia today. It is about 90 million kuna; the road is being relocated, the new port will improve and make life easier for people in that part," he said.

"According to all the announcements, the season should be good for our Jadrolinija liner, but recent events are likely to have consequences for tourism. According to Jadrolinija, we had certain interventions at the end of 2021 since they did not have any help from the state during the entire period of the pandemic.

Jadrolinija is stable; they should start purchasing new ships this year. The plan is to build three new "Postira" because the famous "Postira" is over 50 years old, but it sails. I can't talk about procedures and tenders, but modernizing is crucial for Jadrolinija," said Butković when asked about plans for Jadrolinija.

He pointed out that procuring new ships is also a priority of Jadrolinija.

"Without new ships, we will have a problem in a few years when tenders are announced because there is always a danger that someone who has more modern ships will take over the line. Therefore, the process to modernize and buy new ships must go faster," the Minister of Transport concluded. 

For more, check out our lifestyle section

Thursday, 27 January 2022

Construction Works on Pelješac Bridge Have Finally Been Completed!

January 27, 2022 - After 1277 days, the construction works on Pelješac bridge were completed yesterday, and now the technical inspection follows.

Jutarnji List reports that the technical inspection of the bridge began today, which should be completed by 31 January. Although the formal completion of the works is calculated after the completion of the technical inspection, because during the inspection some shortcomings can be identified that need to be further corrected, today it is possible to say that the construction works on Pelješac bridge have been completed.

The Chinese company CRBC started the construction of the Peljesac bridge on July 30, 2018. On that day, the President of the Croatian Roads Administration, Josip Škorić, handed over all the documentation to the CRBC representatives in Ston, a diary of works was opened and a report on the introduction of the Chinese contractor was signed. The deadline for completion of works was 36 months and 29 days. Although the technical inspection is included in that deadline, it can be said that the construction of the bridge took 52 days longer than planned.

But when you take into account that the works stopped for several months due to the coronavirus epidemic, it can be said that the bridge was completed before the set deadline. After the successful completion of the technical inspection, the procedure for obtaining all necessary permits for the bridge will follow.

At this moment, the works on the bridge have been completed and the connecting road leading from the Adriatic Highway to the bridge will be completed soon.

According to the latest official announcements from Hrvatske ceste, the connecting road from the Adriatic Highway to the bridge, and the new Pelješac road from the bridge to the Prapratno junction will be opened to traffic in the summer. The rest of the road, from the Ston bypass to Doli, should be completed by the end of this year at the latest.

For more, check out our travel section.

Monday, 10 January 2022

Works on Pelješac Bridge to Be Completed this Month, PM Says

ZAGREB, 10 Jan 2022 - The works on Pelješac Bridge will wrap up by the end of the month and the access roads are coming along too, so this tourist season it will be possible to drive across the bridge, Prime Minister Andrej Plenković said on Monday while visiting the site in southern Croatia.

There is ten more days' work on the bridge and a peak traffic test is planned for the end of the month, to be followed by technical checks, he added.

"As announced, the construction of Pelješac Bridge will be near completion by the end of January 2022."

He said the construction of access roads by Austria's Strabag and Greece's Avax was "coming along" and that they were expected to "be near completion in May and June," while the completion of a road near Ston "should follow in early autumn."

"That's what's good at the moment, but this means that it will be possible to drive across Pelješac Bridge this tourist season, which means without crossing borders and the congestion in Neum," Plenković said, adding that thereby Croatia was becoming "a propulsive auto destination, which is extremely important in 2022."

For more on politics, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Thursday, 28 October 2021

Another Peljesac Bridge Construction Site Pops Up as Completion Nears

October the 28th, 2021 - Yet another Peljesac bridge construction site has popped up as the final completion of this massive strategic project draws ever closer and the final touches are dealt with.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes, after what seems like an eternity of talking and then constructing, the works on Peljesac bridge have entered their final phase. Another very important Peljesac bridge construction site has now popped up and been opened next to the bridge itself - the sewage system from Komarna to Duboka.

''We've done 350 metres of the canal and now we're waiting for the entrance to the construction site next to the bridge itself. From there, we're left to connect across the road and descend towards Duboka,'' Ante Jukic, the construction site manager, told HRT.

''I must point out that we've received a valid permit for the use of this section to Duboka, and all of the preparations are underway to connect it all, ie, to connect those facilities that gravitate along the main pipeline,'' said Smiljan Mustapic, the mayor of nearby Slivno.

The connection of the facility to the system in Klek, Duboka and Komarna should start functioning in March next year, because a secondary network has already been built in the streets located directly by the shoreline.

''We've now got until next summer to solve this problem of our bay and then to continue with further development,'' emphasised Stipan Parmac from Duboka.

''We know that every day there are bigger and bigger capacities in the place itself. There's an increasing influx of tourists and I must say that it is to be commended,'' said Mate Dragobratic from Komarna.

Slovenian tourists, including the mayor of Ljutomer, have also been coming to see Peljesac bridge construction site as works have progressed. The bridge thus provoked a spontaneous meeting between the two municipal leaders.

''It's a good bridge because it was designed by a man from Slovenia. Bravo Croatia for building it,'' said Olga Karba, the mayor of Ljutomer, Slovenia.

''We've exchanged numbers and I hope there might even be a possibility of twinning,'' added Smiljan Mustapic, the mayor of Slivno, in response to the Slovenian mayor's comments on Croatia's largest strategic project which will finally unite the extreme south of Dalmatia with the rest of the country's territory.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated business section.

Monday, 25 October 2021

Finally Putting Peljesac Bridge into Function Becoming More of a Reality

October the 25th, 2021 - There is a lot of talk circulating about the long awaited opening of Peljesac bridge which is, along with its access roads, finally nearing total completion. In order to put it into function, however, one very important factor needs to be satisfied.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes, although Peljesac bridge already looks like it is ready for the first cars to drive across it, the final part of the work is still in full swing, and asphalting is what began first.

''Then comes the installation of all of the fences, the installation of internal drainage, the inspection of it all, so, all of that is part of the finalisation stage of the bridge,'' explained Jaroslav Segedin from Hrvatske ceste (Croatian roads) for HRT.

Day by day, Peljesac bridge, Croatia's most important strategic project which unites its territory, is getting closer to completion. The Chinese contractor is slowly finishing its work, and now the emphasis is being placed on the access roads for the bridge. The works should be completed by the beginning of summer 2022.

Representatives of the Austrian company Strabag are working on both sides of Peljesac bridge, on a section 10.5 which is kilometres long. Two bridges, two tunnels, and the terrain is very demanding, but the deadlines have all been met so far.

''We're within [the timeline of] our plans, so it's all going well, as we planned with smaller or larger deviations that don't affect so much of the structure. We've been contracted until mid-July next year,'' said Mladen Marjanovic, the project manager for Strabag.

The total section across Peljesac bridge is thirty kilometres long.

''The current dynamics predict that the works on the Prapratno junction would be completed by June 2022. In that way, the proper conditions would be created for traffic to be allowed to run along the 24-kilometre-long section,'' Segedin said.

The last section, the Ston bypass, should be completed by the end of next year.

For more, make sure to check out our lifestyle section.

Monday, 18 October 2021

Can Peljesac Bridge Withstand Bura, Earthquakes, Maritime Incidents?

October the 18th, 2021 - With the construction of Peljesac bridge finally drawing to a close and with access roads being hurried along, questions about Croatia's most important strategic project which has united its territory have arisen. Can the bridge cope with strong bura or will it need to be closed? What if an earthquake strikes or if a large vessel runs into one of its pillars? An expert provided answers.

As Morski writes, Peljesac bridge with its elegant 2404 metres has surrounded Mali Ston Bay and finally connected Croatian territory. It blends harmoniously into the Dalmatian landscape, but also into a landscape that is not completely safe, either. The bridge is located in an area known for its very frequent seismic activity, where bura and other coastal winds are common and strong. Might a stronger earthquake bring it down, how many gusts of jugo or bura can it withstand, what if a ship crashes into it, and how will its load-bearing capacity and stability be monitored over the years to come?

The answers to these pressing questions came from Croatian roads/Hrvatske ceste, that is, directly from Goran Legac, the engineer who is leading the historic project of the road connection of southern Dalmatia with the rest of the country, as reported by tportal.

His job is to prepare the project, organise, control and supervise all of the participants and their activities and ensure that everything being done is in line with the set plans in terms of deadlines and finances. Simply put, he and his team of experts from various professions, along with the help of numerous surveillance services, are the ones ''hanging'' over the heads of the Chinese workers who are building Peljesac Bridge, the Greeks (Avax) and the Austrians (Strabag) whose task is to build all of the accompanying access roads.

''For the quality delivery of the construction work itself, the most important thing is announcing and controlling all of the technical specifications through project documentation that must be completed by the contractor. Conditionally speaking, we perform the project with the same goal, but often with a different approach. The contractor strives to optimise the project in order to earn as much as possible while achieving the required quality. The designer, on the other hand, deals with all the highest standards and norms in order to make the construction as durable as possible. And that's in the interest of the client, in this case Hrvatske ceste, because of the maintenance costs involved,'' explained Legac.

In the case of Peljesac bridge, maintenance costs will be of course by very high. In theory, these costs are calculated by dividing the value of the structure by the expected period of use.

''It's common to expect that in the projected life of a construction, let's say we're talking about a 100-or-so-year period, the construction and equipment of the bridge through regular and extraordinary maintenance will be completely repaired and then replaced. So if the construction cost two billion kuna, then at least that much more will be spent in 100 years on maintenance alone. Of course, these costs will be lower in the beginning, and will increase later in accordance with the contractor's guarantees,'' stated Legac.

What exactly has been done to make sure Peljesac bridge will withstand those 100 years, and hopefully much longer, without shortening its ''shelf life'' due to some of the natural disasters such as earthquakes or strong winds Croatia is no stranger to?

Several tectonic faultlines are located very close to the bridge...

Southern Croatia is one of the most seismic areas in the entire country. According to seismologists, the maximum intensity of earthquakes that can hit Dalmatia ranges from 6.3 to 7 degrees on the Richter scale. The fact that there are several faultlines very near to Peljesac bridge isn't particularly encouraging in this case, which is evident by looking at the scientific database of all European seismic faults.

Legac confirmed all this, but also pointed out that there is no room for fear.

''It's true that the bridge is located in a zone which has very high levels of seismic activity, with a design ground acceleration at the foundation level of 0.34 g, which is extremely strong. However, the structure is designed and constructed to withstand what earthquakes can cause without collapsing. The level of usability ensures sufficient rigidity so that the bridge can be used even after an earthquake strikes. So, Peljesac bridge can withstand even the strongest earthquakes that can be reasonably expected to strike the area,'' assured Legac.

He added huge steel pipes with a diameters of 1.8 metres and two metres, were used to base the pillars in the sea itself. Their length ranges from 36 to 130.9 metres. For comparison, the height of the Zagreb Cathedral is 108 metres. These pipes were driven down firmly into the seabed, with the 130.9-metre one being the world record holder because it is the largest ever to be driven down into one piece, as pipes of these lengths are usually put in in extensions.

In addition to being located in a highly seismic area, the location of Peljesac bridge is known for some extremely strong Dalmatian winds. Will we have the same situation as we unfortunately did with the Maslenica bridge, which closes to traffic when bura or jugo blows?

Legac assured that this will not be the case. Namely, during the design and construction, the problem of local winds was taken into account and the construction of the bridge was tested in an air tunnel, writes tportal.

''The analysis predicts wind gusts of as much as 180 kilometres per hour. From my experience, because I've lived near the bridge for about three and a half years now, in Mali Ston Bay the jugo is much more intense than the bura wind is. Along the entire length of the bridge on both sides there will be windbreaks 3.2 which are metres high. You can see similar windbreaks on the Baricevic viaduct on the highway near Sv. Rok. They are a guarantee that the traffic will run smoothly in almost all weather conditions up to a wind speed of 180 kilometres per hour,'' Legac pointed out, adding that there are windbreaks on the construction site and they are waiting for installation as well.

The pillars of Peljesac bridge can withstand the impact of a ship of 10 thousand tonnes.

In addition to natural issues such as earthquakes and wind, the design of the bridge had to take into account its navigation profile, which was insisted on by neighbouring Bosnia and Herzegovina, and some Bosnian politicians were known for their negative stance towards the very construction of the bridge. This guarantees extra protection for both vessels and the bridge itself. But what if a large ship crashes into one of the bridge's pillars? Can he knock it down?

''There are currently no shipping lines in this area. Nonetheless, a waterway passing through the central range is envisaged. Large ships will be able to sail under the bridge. This will prevent large ships from hitting the pillars,'' Legac said.

Even if such a situation were to occur, Peljesac bridge's strong pillars are designed to withstand the impact of a vessel, with those in the middle, between which the waterway passes, being able to fully withstand the impact of a medium-sized ship of 100 metres in length and weighing up to 10,000 tonnes.

Given the strategic importance of Peljesac bridge, the project envisages the installation of equipment for its continuous monitoring. Through it, various parameters will be monitored in real time.

''Concrete isn't eternal, as some claim it to be. You have the example of the Krk bridge, which has undergone four major reconstructions in 40 years. However, Peljesac bridge is built from concrete that has the most modern additives and is much stronger class than the concrete typically used before. Chemical technology has advanced the most in the field of construction, and all of this is a guarantee that Peljesac bridge will be able to serve us for a very long time to come,'' concluded Legac.

For more, make sure to check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

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