Thursday, 24 October 2019

Ecological Footprint Measured at NP Kornati and PP Lastovo

October 24, 2019 - Thanks to the DestiMED project, the Kornati National Park and the Lastovo Islands Nature Park were able to measure the ecological footprint of their tourist offer, which is now available to Croatia’s other protected areas.

Not surprisingly, food turns out to have the most impact on the ecological footprint of visitors on the protected area itself.

Namely, HRTurizam writes that at the closing ceremony of the international DestiMED project held in Rome, the latest methodology for monitoring the ecological footprint of tourists in protected areas in the Mediterranean Sea was presented, and among the areas where the method was tested were the Kornati National Park and the Lastovo Islands Nature Park.

Using the standardized tools of the world's leading eco-footprint measurement organization, Global Footprint Network, as a starting point, partners in the DestiMED project adapted the eco-footprint methodology for environmental impact assessment. Not only was the ecological footprint of each tourist who participated in the latest eco-tourism offer measured, but concrete steps were taken to manage the environmental footprint in that offer. Specific components, such as food, lodging, transportation, and recreational activities, were taken into account.

The results indicated that food and drink had the most substantial environmental impact, especially in those packages that offered large quantities of meat products.

"The methodology for monitoring the ecological footprint we developed within the DestiMED project and the first of its kind in the world has helped protected areas and tourism professionals in the Kornati National Park and the Lastovo Islands Nature Park see where their tours are great, and where there is space for improvement when it comes to the impact on the environment and nature. Moreover, new and alternative business opportunities have been identified that are pushing us towards more sustainable local development,” explains Mosor Prvan of WWF Adria, DestiMED project manager.

By making better choices and promoting the best practices in tourism and recreation, protected areas can address the environmental impact of their tourism packages developed as part of the DestiMED project, while improving the quality of services offered to tourists, concluded WWF Adria.

In the future, the free online eco-footprint calculator will make the methodology applicable to all protected areas in the Mediterranean that are ready to create and test their ecotourism packages.

You can view the online tool here.

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Sunday, 13 October 2019

Research Being Carried Out at NP Kornati to Lower Amount of Rubbish

As SibenikIN writes on the 12th of October, 2019, the popular Kornati National Park (NP Kornati) is undergoing research this weekend to identify the sources of waste pollution in the area of ​​that particular national park. Based on the results of the research, an attempt will be made to determine the proportion of waste that comes into the Kornati area carried by the sea's currents and waste generated in the area of ​​the park itself.

The research, which has been continuing over the weekend, started back in October 2017. As stated, based on the results of the research, measures will be defined to reduce the amount of waste generated in the park area, all with the aim of preserving and protecting the extremely valuable Kornati submarine areas.

The research is being carried out in cooperation with the Society for Underwater Sports - DPS Zagreb, and is being led by Ph.D. Martina Markov.

The exceptional biodiversity of Kornati's submarine is one of the reasons why part of the Kornati archipelago was declared a national park back in 1980. To date, more than 1,300 plant and animal species have been recorded in the Kornati submarine, including 366 types of algae, 3 sea flowers, 81 sponge species, 78 sea urchin species, 17 starfish species, 71 coral species, 145 snail species, 59 shellfish species, 77 crustacean species and 188 species of fish. With each new survey, the list is enriched with yet more, newly discovered species.

The greater part of the coastal zone is inhabited by the beautiful posidonia marine flowering plants, whose habitats are primarily NATURA 2000 habitats. The submarine cliffs there are characterised by coralligen - a habitat composed of red algae. Coralligen is home for an extremely large variety of species that are suitable for reduced light conditions - such as sponges, corals, and red and brown algae.

In the wider area of ​​the Kornati National Park, which includes the Žut-Sit group of islands and the Murter area, 147 different species of bottlenose dolphins have been recorded so far, and often sea turtles - such as loggerhead turtles - which are strictly protected animals.

Make sure to follow our dedicated lifestyle page for much more. If you're interested in both official and unofficial ways Croatia works to protect its environment, give Total Eco Croatia a follow.

Friday, 19 April 2019

VIDEO: Unusual Fight Between Seagull and Octopus in NP Kornati

A seagull tried to make an octopus his dinner, but the octopus wasn't in the mood. This unusual footage from NP Kornati showcases the struggle between bird and would-be prey.

Along Croatia's coast or on its many islands, you're likely to witness battles and very loud ''arguments'' by street cats wanting to get hold of the last fish, or maybe even witness seagulls falling out with each other, what you don't often see however is a showdown between a seagull and his ''almost dinner'', an octopus who simply had no plans to be a meal that day.

As Morski writes on the 18th of April, 2019, after some rather surprising footage from far away in Australia, where a seagull's attempt to make a grumpy octopus a meal turned very sour for the opportunistic sea bird indeed, another almost identical scene has been caught on camera, but this time much closer to home, right here in Croatia, from the beautiful NP Kornati in the Zadar region.

The video was initially taken back in October 2018, and author of the video and witness to this rather bizarre fight, Jure Jerat, says the rather unlucky seagull managed to come out of the fight a little bit better off than the Australian seagull did when he attempted the same ''assault'' on an octopus that just wasn't having it.

While we by no means endorse any type of blood sport here at TCN, this does make for interesting viewing, it certainly isn't something you see on a daily basis and it's difficult to say who we'd put our money on! Have a look for yourself and see who comes out on top in this extremely unusual argument between two very different species at Croatia's beautiful NP Kornati.

Make sure to follow our dedicated lifestyle page for much more.

Sunday, 12 August 2018

How Much Do You Really Know About The Kornati Islands?

Ever been to the Kornati islands?

Saturday, 26 November 2016

You’ll be Planning a Trip to Rogoznica After Watching the Official 2017 Promo Video

The Tourist Board of Rogoznica has just released a new promotional video for 2017 titled "Rogoznica - The Heart of Dalmatia" which highlights the beauty of this Dalmatian tourist pearl that has become one of the leading destinations for family holidays in Croatia.

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