Tuesday, 16 February 2021

VIDEO Peljesac Bridge Makes Giant Progress Leap With Land Connection

February 16, 2021 – The future of Croatian travel is almost here! In this brand new video Peljesac Bridge's gigantic horizontal sections are installed, joining the land to colossal sea pillars and bringing to life a project so mammoth it was previously difficult to visualise

The Peljesac Bridge project is so huge, it hasn't been easy to imagine just how it will look. Even after seeing all the plans, maps, computer-generated graphics and the imported parts arriving the bridge will be so vast, so important, so revolutionary for Croatia, visualisation of how life will look on the other side has been hard. Until now.

In this brand new video Peljesac Bridge's gigantic horizontal sections are installed, joining the land to colossal pillars standing steadfast within the brilliant blue of the Adriatic sea. We can finally see in the video Peljesac Bridge coming to life, taking shape and how connectivity to southern Dalmatia and its islands will be changed forever.

Explaining Peljesac Bridge's significance and life-changing promise to those not from Croatia can be difficult. Sure, rising 55 metres above the sea and stretching over 2400 metres in length, this is a big bridge. After reeling off the figures, anyone would be sure to agree. But, there are many, much bigger bridges out there.

Vividly illustrating its importance, in this video Peljesac Bridge is seen joining two parts of the Croatian mainland over a vast stretch of sea. On a bright and sunny day there is no interruption of the light glaring down on the project. Within a beautiful backdrop of pristine blue waters and clear, cloudless skies – a sight that will be familiar to all who have visited Croatia – in the video Peljesac Bridge can be seen traversing a topography littered with islands and peninsulas. And, in the background, lies another country altogether – Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The never-ending tailbacks, time-consuming, business-retarding and visitor-annoying border controls required for travel across the thin section of Bosnia and Herzegovina are absent from these February scenes. But, not only are they absent from this video Peljesac Bridge will eliminate them forever. Following the bridge's completion, south Dalmatia, Dubrovnik and its islands, will be just as accessible by road as Split or Makarska. Brought to life by this video Peljesac Bridge progress is more than just taking shape – the future is almost upon us.

Monday, 15 February 2021

Good Progression for Peljesac Bridge Construction, Finished by End of Year?

February the 15th, 2021 - What with coronavirus, a few political scandals and protests being held by those who were unable to work due to the country's current epidemiological measures, it's been easy to forget about what was once a top theme in the news and media - the Peljesac bridge construction process down in southern Dalmatia.

The Peljesac bridge construction wasn't immune to the coronavirus crisis either, with parts and even Chinese workers unable to get into the country for some time a while ago before proper measures could be thought up and introduced in a timely manner, leading many to wonder if this will be yet another stragetic Croatian project that fails to meet the deadline. This fate for the bridge, however, seems to have been averted, at least for now.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes, today, the Peljesac bridge construction is set to take another important step to its much anticipated final realisation as it will finally connect with the mainland, that is, the first pillar that rises up out of the sparkling Adriatic sea below will connect with the pillar from the mainland, marking a significant leap in progress.

Davor Peric, a civil engineer from Hrvatske ceste (Croatian roads), explained that the two parts would be connected by an element 52 which is 52 metres long and weighs as much as 587 tonnes in total.

Given the fact that Chinese hands working for a Chinese enterprise are the ones building the massive structure, the Chinese New Year was also celebrated in Komarna, the location of the Peljesac bridge construction site, and the workers were all on a two-day break.

''The celebration was well felt,'' said Ivo Jerkovic, the owner of the facility where the Chinese workers are accommodated for RTL Danas/Today, adding that they also prepared gifts for the workers, including homemade wine, olive oil and other traditional gifts which are given at this time of year in that culture.

The Peljesac bridge construction process, at this rate, could even be completed by the end of the year despite all of the obstacles it has faced, both long before and during the pandemic.

For the latest travel info, bookmark our main travel info article, which is updated daily

Read the Croatian Travel Update in your language - now available in 24 languages.

Join the Total Croatia Travel INFO Viber community.

Friday, 24 July 2020

Crossing the Neum Border with Croatia & BiH in the Corona Era: New Rules (July 24 Update)

July 24, 2020 - Crossing the Neum border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina in the corona era has a slightly different procedure. 

July 24 update - TCN passed through the Neum Corridor twice this week. Waiting times at both borders were under 3 minutes on both occasions. Passports are scanned on the Croatian side and you have one hour to transit through. There were no border guards on the BiH side. There are no issues with any nationality transiting through. 

PLEASE NOTE: THIS SITUATION CONTINUES TO BE THE CASE AFTER JULY 1 BORDER OPENING UPDATE. IF YOU ARE IN TRANSIT, YOU CAN PASS THROUGH.

One of the most-asked questions every summer is from tourists wanting to travel between Split and Dubrovnik, and what happens at the Neum Corridor, the 23-km coastal strip, sometimes called the Bosnian Riviera, which divides Dubrovnik and southern Dalmatia from the rest of Croatia? With Croatia now in the EU and on the brink of joining the Schengen zone, it means that a journey between Dalmatia's most popular tourism cities entails leaving the EU for about 20 minutes, before reentering Croatia at the Neum border. 

The usual procedures are explained in this Total Croatia article on how to get from Split to Dubrovnik. If you don't want to leave Croatia, it is possible to stay within the country by taking the ferry service from Ploce on the mainland across to Trpanj on the Peljesac Peninsula. The Peljesac Bridge is also due for completion in 2022, at which point independent Croatia will be joined in one contiguous territory for the first time. 

On my recent tour of the Croatian border control system, I asked about Neum and was surprised to learn that there was a change in the border crossing rules during the pandemic, a change which has been in force for a couple of months now, I think. 

The Neum border is currently ONLY available for transit passengers. As such, you can travel on an ID, but your stay in BiH is timed. You have an hour to cross the 23 km. Your journey is timed, and if you take more than an hour, you will have problems as you try and reenter Croatia. 

The Bosnian border police are also actively encouraging those who pass through the Neum border that this is transit only. 

I always stop for lunch at Neum when I am driving down to Albania or Montenegro, but I guess this is discouraged for the moment. 

If anyone has any experiences of recent travel across the Neum border, please let me know, and we will add to this resource. Send to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Subject Neum.  

For the latest travel info, bookmark our main travel info article, which is updated daily

Join the Total Croatia Travel INFO Viber community.

Read the Croatian Travel Update in your language - now available in 24 languages

 

Friday, 10 May 2019

World's Biggest Welcome in Croatia: Day 49 - Ston to Ploče (Kayak, Paddle, Bike, Row)

May 10, 2019 - Putting Croatian adventure tourism on the map, with the biggest welcome in the world. Day 49 of this incredible 2011 adrenaline trip covering 2,500 km along the Croatian coast. 

The World's Biggest Welcome, an ambitious adventure tourism project in 2011 in Croatia enters Day 49 of this 2019 appreciation of one of the finest tourism promotion projects ever in Croatia.  

The plan? To showcase the diversity and fabulous offer of adventure tourism in Croatia by following a GPS route the length of the Croatian coast in the shape of the word 'Welcome' - thereby creating the biggest welcome in the world from a hospitable tourism country. 

252052_214585278561491_1378212_n.jpg

Day 49 moved from Ston to Ploče.

Screenshot 2019-05-10 at 07.10.26.png

61 kilometres for the day: 3 km by kayak and paddling from Ston to Neum, followed by 33 km bike ride from Neum to Metković, and 25 km from Metković to the Neretva firth rowing in an old Neretva style boat to continue forming the ‘E’ in ‘Welcome’.

249329_214584895228196_4076480_n.jpg

252423_214584928561526_4377690_n.jpg

249253_214584958561523_714846_n.jpg

Day 49 kicked off with a send-off from the kids of Mali Ston. 

250222_214584978561521_454179_n.jpg

Lacko trying out his new vessel. 

251649_214584991894853_2714754_n.jpg

Lacko giving tribute to Czech adventurers who often choose paddle boats as their transport on the Adriatic.

250312_214585015228184_1823371_n.jpg

248394_214585031894849_4076747_n.jpg

They traded in their paddleboats for bikes and set off towards Bijeli Vir.

250434_214585058561513_8146163_n.jpg

Passing Lake Kuti along the way. 

253090_214585118561507_307181_n.jpg

Locals in Bijeli Vir admiring their traveling circus.

254973_214585175228168_7646270_n.jpg

Lacko made it to Metković and rowed with the team from Krvavac 2 in an original ship from Neretva. 

252059_214585188561500_398065_n.jpg

Passing by the Kula Norinska tower. 

249494_214585205228165_8297799_n.jpg

Krvavac 2 arriving in Opuzen where Kominski pirates gave Lacko a proper welcome.

252370_214585241894828_5298579_n.jpg

The Kominski gusari pirate ship.

247215_214585295228156_3504793_n.jpg

They even let Lacko steer for a bit!

252062_214585315228154_4162349_n.jpg

Kominski gusari pirates in Crna rijeka.

254083_214585345228151_5290910_n.jpg

The day ended with a group photo. 

A key part of the project was promoting tourism, and the official website has details of the key places visited during the day. 

You can see the entire project on the Welcome website, as well as much more of Luka Tambaca's stunning photography on the Welcome Facebook page

Tune in tomorrow for Day 50, as Lacko and the team move from the Neretva to Korčula. 

To follow the whole project from the start, follow the dedicated TCN page

Search