Friday, 8 October 2021

Export in Jan-Aug Up by 25.5%, Import by 19.8%

ZAGREB, 8 Oct 2021 - Croatia's commodity exports in the first eight months of 2021 was HRK 87.7 billion, up 25.5% on the year, while import increased 19.8% to HRK 134.6 billion, the national statistical office said on Friday.

The foreign trade deficit increased by HRK 4.45 billion to 46.9 billion.

Coverage of imports by export was 65.9%.

The export of goods to EU countries was HRK 59.7 billion (+25.2%), while import was HRK 103.4 billion (+16.3%).

Export to non-EU countries went up by 26.1% to HRK 28 billion, while import went up by 33.3% to HRK 31.1 billion.

Expressed in euros, Croatia's export of goods in the first eight months of 2021 was €11.6 billion, up 25.1% on the year, while import increased by 19.4% to €17.9 billion.

The foreign trade deficit was €6.2 billion.

Commodity exports to EU countries was €7.9 billion (+24.8%), while import was €13.7 billion (+15.9%).

Export to non-EU countries went up by 25.6% to €3.7 billion, while import went up by 32.8% to €4.1 billion.

For more on business, CLICK HERE.

Friday, 9 July 2021

Croatia's Jan-May Exports Up by 25.5%, Imports by 17.5%

ZAGREB, 9 July 2021 - Croatia's commodity exports totalled HRK 53.2 billion in the first five months of 2021, up by 25.5% on the year, while import increased by 17.5%, to HRK 81.4 billion, the State Bureau of Statistics (DZS) reported on Friday.

The foreign trade deficit increased by HRK 1.3 billion to HRK 28.2 billion. Coverage of imports by exports reached 65.4%.

Exports to EU countries amounted to HRK 36.1 billion or 23.9% more year-on-year. At the same time imports from EU countries increased by 15.3% to HRK 63.5 billion.

Exports to non-EU countries increased by 29.2% to HRK 17.1 billion while imports from those countries increased by 26% to HRK 17.9 billion.

Expressed in euro, exports totalled slightly over €7 billion, an increase of 24.4% on the year, while imports rose by 16.4% to €10.76 billion. The trade deficit was €3.7 billion.

Exports to EU countries increased by 22.8% to €4.8 billion, while imports rose by 14.3% to €8.4 billion. Exports to non-EU countries went up by 27.9% to €2.3 billion, while imports from those countries grew by 24.8% to €2.4 billion.

For more on business, CLICK HERE.

Friday, 7 May 2021

Croatian Bureau of Statistics (DZS): Croatian export rises 9.5%, import 2.1% in 2021 Q1

ZAGREB, 7 May, 2021 - Croatia exported the commodities worth 30 billion kuna in the first three months of 2021, which was 9.5% more in comparison to the corresponding period in 2020, whereas the imports rose 2.1% to HRK 46.5 billion, the national statistical office (DZS) reported on Friday.

As a result, Croatia's foreign trade deficit in Q1 2021 narrowed by nine percent to HRK 16.45 billion compared to the 2020 Q1.

The coverage of the import by the export was 64.6%.

In the first three months of 2021, HRK 20.7 billion worth of goods was exported to the EU, 8.9% more on the year, and HRK 9.3 billion to non-EU countries (+10.9%).

The import of goods from the EU totalled HRK 36.7 billion, which was the same level as in the corresponding period of 2020, while import from other countries rose 11.4% to HRK 9.7 billion.

Expressed in euros, Croatia's goods export totalled €3.97 billion, up 7.9%, while import increased 0.6% to €6.1 billion.

The foreign trade deficit was €2,2 billion.

For more about business in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Saturday, 19 December 2020

Croatia Agriculture and Food Exports Jump in 2020, Imports Fall

December 19, 2020 – A surprising success story in a difficult year as Croatia agriculture and food exports jump in 2020, while imports of the same have fallen

Good news from any place is welcome in this most difficult of years. According to provisional data from the country's Central Bureau of Statistics, the total value of Croatia agriculture and food exports in the period from January to September 2020 amounted to 1.7 billion Euros, an increase of 5 percent from the same period in 2019. Within the same period, the value of agricultural and food imports into Croatia was 2.5 billion Euros, a decline of 7.3 percent from last year.

The success of Croatia agriculture and food exports in the period means that the country's trade deficit has decreased by huge 26.6 percent compared to the same period last year. With this year's findings taken into account, the trade deficit now stands at 758.8 million Euros.

fieldsromi2.jpg© Romulić & Stojčić

Croatia agriculture and food exports covered 69 percent of total imports this year, an increase of 8.11 percent. A total of 15.86 percent of all exports from the country come from the Croatia agriculture and food exports sector.

The most important item of production within the sector is corn, which accounts for 5.4 percent of all Croatia agriculture and food exports.

From January to September 2020, the most significant products in exports were: cereals (205.4 million Euros – a growth of a huge 62.6 million Euros); various food products (168.1 million Euros – including manufactured/processed foods like sauces, soups, ice cream, sugar products); fish and other seafood (a huge 147.4 million Euros – showing a growth of 14.5 million Euros); cereals, flour, starch or milk products; confectionery products, including chocolate (135.9 million Euros – a growth of 13.8 million Euros), and tobacco-related products (122.6 million Euros). TCN recently took a closer look at the successful and well-established Croatian chocolate industry

Other successes within 2020 Croatia agriculture and food exports were live animals, with an increase of 10.1 million Euros, and the residue and waste of the food industry, which is exported to go into prepared animal foods. The latter saw an increase of 8.6 million Euros.

brancinsfinal.jpg

So far this year, Italy was one of the most important destinations for Croatia agriculture and food exports. Their total consumption of Croatia agriculture and food exports was 300.8 million Euros, which amounts to 17.76 percent of Croatia's exports in the sector. Croatia agriculture and food exports to Italy increased by 21.9 percent this year, while imports from Italy to Croatia in the same period was 263 million Euros, a decrease of 16.6 percent on 2019. This creates a surplus of 37.6 million Euros.

The most important Croatia agriculture and food exports to Italy are maize, wheat and soybeans, tobacco-related products, sea bass (brancin) and bream (orada).

For the last five years, Croatia agriculture and food exports top consumer has been Germany. For the past seven years, Germany has also been the country from which Croatia has imported the most.

Saturday, 27 April 2019

Croatian Fruit Arriving in Slovenia and Austria Just 24 Hours After Harvest

The Croatian fruits and vegetables are being sold through the FinotekaDostava.com website, in order to successfully cut out the middleman.

As Miroslav Kuskunovic/Agrobiz/Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 27th of April, 2019, Croatian fruit and vegetable producers, as well the producers of other Croatian value-added products, have begun to use the benefits of the common EU (single) market and the ability to place and sell products in Austria and Slovenia, for now. On the FinotekaDostava.com website, customers from Croatia, Slovenia and Austria are able to order products from Croatian OPGs from the comfort of their own homes. Once ordered, the produce is freshly and carefully packed and delivered to their addresses directly from Croatia.

"Finoteka's specificity is that we don't store our fruit and vegetables, but we function with the ''from the field to the table within 24 hours'' principle. This literally means that some fruit or vegetables that are growing right now in a garden in Croatia are going to be sent out in package delivered to someone's doorstep in Vienna, Ljubljana or Zagreb the next day,'' said Hrvoje Kolman, the owner of Finoteka Dostava.

Kolman has been placing and selling products from Croatian OPGs since back in 2008 in this manner. However, his website first became the most well known a few years ago when, through his search engine, a huge amount of fruit from the Neretva Valley ended up being sold and sent throughout Croatia when a ban on exports of agricultural products to Russia from the EU was first introduced.

"Our delivery is as good on the islands as it is on the mainland. The quality of the service and the delivery speed is the same regardless of whether you live in the city or in the most remote place. All our fruit and vegetable packages arrive within 24 hours of harvest, whether you're in Croatia, Slovenia, or anywhere in Austria,'' says Kolman. He explained that the Austrian market has been being tested over recent months, while they have been present on the Slovenian market for more than a year now.

"We deliver about 100 packages per month to Slovenia. Asparagus have been doing well these days, and strawberries, cherries and other fruits and vegetables will begin soon,'' says Kolman.

The prices of Croatian quality products are, however, slightly lower than those on sale in Slovenia and Austria, which is why it is expected that such sales from Croatia could become very attractive indeed. Croatian farmers deliver their products to Finoteka, the products are carefully reviewed, and depending on the order, they're packed on that same day and then sent out. Croatian farmers get to cut out the middleman, and consumers don't have the worry of eating food which is of unknown origin, it's also GMO free, it hasn't been stored, and it hasn't been sprayed.

"It's very important for us to know who we're cooperating with. We choose good producers above all, those to whom agriculture isn't just a business but also a pleasure. We choose those whose eyes shine when they talk about their products. Finding and selecting such people is are biggest challenge," says Kolman.

Make sure to follow our dedicated Made in Croatia and business pages for more information on Croatian products, Croatian companies and OPGs, Croatian services and much more.

 

Click here for the original article by Miroslav Kuskunovic/Agrobiz on Poslovni Dnevnik

Wednesday, 17 April 2019

Croatia's Hangar18 Opens First Store in Dublin, Ireland

As Bernard Ivezic/Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 16th of April, 2019, in the very first NOA store in Dublin, Ireland, this company from Koprivnica, Croatia, sells mobile phones, televisions and mobile phone accessories all under their own brand.

Croatia's successful Hangar18 company from Koprivnica, which has developed its very own brand of mobile phones, NOA, which has a market share in the domestic field immediately behind giants like Samsung and Apple, has opened its first own NOA store.

The first brand store the company has opened is in the Irish city of Dublin, and this Croatian technology company has stated that it plans a further fifteen such stores in Ireland alone. Additionally, over the next three years, Hangar18 plans to open a total of one hundred of its own NOA stores across Western Europe.

Mario Pintar, Marketing Manager at Hangar18, says this enviably successful Croatian company has changed their approach to developing its sales network. In Eastern markets, with the exception of Croatia, and where they have been operating so far, the company does business via distributors, while in the west, he wants to be in direct contact with the company's customers.

"Customers in Eastern Europe buy mobile phones of up to 150 euros, while in the west, due to the better purchasing power, they're buying more expensive devices, and we see a greater room for growth," explained Pintar. He added that the company's expansion initially started a year ago, and intensive work has been going on on for the past six months.

He didn't want to comment on just how much the company invested, nor did he want offer any comment on much they plan to invest in further expansion. According to data from Business Croatia, Hangar18 saw growth from 242 to 137 million kuna from 2013 to 2017, its exports jumped to an impressive 66.7 million kuna, and its net profit rose from 1.3 to 4.8 million kuna. Mario Pintar says that they already have a warehouse over in Ireland and that they're hiring the first workers for it. He says that on average, the company will require three to four employees per store, and potentially even more for sales and management.

"Our colleague Tihana Magdić has been living in Dublin for a long time, so that's why we started with Ireland. She was promoted to country manager, she's well acquainted with the market, and the shopping centre we first entered was a great partner and it was very easy to arrange everything with them,'' Pintar said.

Pintar explained that in the west, Croatia's Hangar18 will compete in the B category of brands, but as the first choice of those who instead of A brands want the Best Buy mobile.

"What sets us apart is the fact that we give customers the functionality of A brand at a fair price, and then the Noa Premium Care warranty covers the first twelve months for damages such as screen breakages and water damage, and our ''after sales support,'' and we open our authorised NOA service in every country we enter,'' explained Pintar.

He added that after Ireland, Croatia's Hangar18 plans to open stores in other European countries, including the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Spain. However, he noted the fact that they hadn't forgotten about the eastern markets. For example, in Croatia alone, there are fifteen retail outlets where they sell various brands of ICT equipment. "Recently, we've been able to directly export to Russia as a third company from Croatia, which opens opportunities for us in both Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan,'' concluded Hangar18's Pintar.

Make sure to follow our dedicated Made in Croatia and business pages for more on business in Croatia, investment in Croatia, products and services from Croatia and much more.

 

Click here for the original article by Bernard Ivezic for Poslovni Dnevnik

Friday, 5 April 2019

Croatian Company ''Include'' Continues with Exports and New Markets

At the beginning of 2019, the Croatian company Include signed a two-year distribution agreement with one of the largest global providers of telecommunications services - Deutsche Telekom.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 4th of April, 2019, 42 global markets, six continents, 260 cities across the world, more than 1000 smart benches installed, cooperation with major global corporations, the European Parliament, Deloitte, Forbes... all in just four years - this is just part of the successful results the Croatian company Include from Solin has achieved since May 2015, when the first smart bench was introduced, until the beginning of 2019.

In the first quarter, Solin's Include didn't manage to acheive any real or significant results, as most markets were still covered by snow, and the first installations usually only begin in spring, but in 2019, Include achieved significant export performance. The amount of ordered benches, when compared to the first quarter of 2018, just one year ago, increased by an impressive 109 percent to  a staggering 2.3 million kuna, while total revenues increased by 115 percent.

At the beginning of this year, Include signed a two-year distribution agreement with one of the largest global providers of telecommunications services, Deutsche Telekom. The contract was signed for fifty global markets, and Include became one of the few Croatian companies with this type of somewhat prestigious contract.

In January this year, 44 Steora smart benches worth over 1.1 million kuna were sold and a new market opened its doors, Poland. The largest share of the bench sales relate to exports, and the Steora smart bench has found its way across Europe, having been delivered to Italy, France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Spain.

In February this year, Include continued its export activities - with new orders from neighbouring Montenegro, a new market opened (Chile, with two Steora Standard benches) and the month ended with deliveries of 27 smart bench to Greece, Ireland, Israel, Poland, Italy, and Hungary.

March 2019, as the ''test polygon'' for spring, resulted in orders of a new product from Include's sales portfolio - the Monna cyclo tables for Dublin. The new product was presented at the Smart City Expo World Congress in mid-November 2018 in Barcelona, Spain. In addition, two new distribution agreements were signed (Slovenia - 50 benches, France - 72 benches), five Steora benches for Chile and Bermuda were ordered, as were 38 benches for other European countries - the United Kingdom, France, and Montenegro.

It's certainly important to highlight the continuation of Include's global digital outdoor advertising project via the Steora Urban+ smart benches. After they started the project with the installation of fifteen Steora Urban+ benches in Bratislava (at the best locations in the city), at the end of 2018, the project increased its pace in March this year with the another fifteen new Steora Urban+ smart benches, this time in Dublin, Ireland.

Currently, two major cities in the European Union are using Include's external digital advertising system through the Steora smart bench, it is an advanced DOOH system developed within the company itself. The system works using Facebook-like technology, enabling you to choose multiple advertising screens at the same time, set marketing campaign goals, and track advertising results in real-time.

Croatia's Include expects significant business results in the upcoming two quarters, and in addition to that, the realisation of a new investment round is being prepared, followed by the expansion of production capacities and the recruitment of new employees.

Make sure to follow our dedicated business and Made in Croatia pages for much more.

Thursday, 4 April 2019

Potential for Croatian Producers as Prosciutto Exports Continue to Grow

As Morski writes on the 3rd of April, 2019, what has been happening with prosciutto for the past three to four years is truly spectacular. Due to its superior properties and specific traditional production technology, Croatian prosciutto producers have stumbled upon some great export potential and even more potential for the product's better placement in Croatian tourism through the country's already rich gastronomic offer.

When compared to five years ago in 2014, exports have increased in quantity by fourteen times, and perhaps most importantly, in value eleven times. Approximately 88 percent of total exports go to the EU market, and just over eleven percent go to CEFTA countries.

''The latest 2018 statistics show an increase in exports of shank and aitchbone products by nearly sixty percent, but unfortunately, we still don't even cover a third of imports. We need new investments and we need to invest in new prosciutto production capacities to double our production, and 700,000 pieces annually to at least meet the needs of the domestic market,'' said Dragan Kovačević, vice president of the Croatian Chamber of Economy for Agriculture and Tourism, at a press conference announcing the event Days of Croatian Prosciutto.

Ante Madir, Executive Director of the "Hrvatsko pršuta" (Croatian prosciutto) cluster, which brings together producers responsible for 95 percent of the total prosciutto production in the Republic of Croatia, explained more precisely what awaits Croatia on the fifth Days of Croatian prosciutto, which is being held from the 26th to the 27th of April at the Zagreb International Hotel this year.

''On the first day, we'll have a manifestation with round tables and workshops, the expert part of the gathering, and the second day at Ban Jelačić Square, there'll be a show-selling part where people can taste our prosciutto,'' Madir said, adding that they decided on Zagreb because quite a large market and a high demand for the product can be found in the Croatian capital.

"What's been happening with prosciutto over the past three to four years is truly spectacular. The signs of protection (special labels) are our tickets to the wider European Union market, that's very important for being able to [have our products] arrive to shop shelves. In Croatia, we still need to work on presenting [our products] to consumers to have them pay more money for something which is domestic and specific,'' said Igor Miljak, chairman of the PPK Karlovac meat industry, stressing that Croatia still doesn't have key gastro brands that are recognised on the European or global market, but it definitely does have the quality to be able to cope well with the competition.

Ana Babić from Voštane pršut, a representative of the Association of Dalmatian Prosciutto, explained the difference between Dalmatian and Istrian, or more specifically Krk prosciutto.

''Dalmatian prosciutto is smoked, while Istrian and Krk prosciutto isn't. There are no additives or preservatives in its production, and the process itself lasts for at least a year,'' Babić explained, adding that the tradition of Dalmatian prosciutto production draws its roots from as far back as ancient Roman times.

Drago Pletikosa of Belcrotrade and the president of the Association of Drniš pršut stressed that Drniš prosciutto is a little and is therefore certified, although there is no difference between Drniš and Dalmatian prosciutto when it comes to the production process itself.

''Last year, we imported 3,848 tons of products worth more than 21.5 million euros and exported 1.113 tons (6.5 million euros). Compared to 2014, exports have increased in quantity fourteen times, and by value eleven times. Approximately 88 percent of our total exports go to the EU market, and just over eleven percent go to CEFTA countries. We export the most to Slovenia (35.5 percent of total exports) and to Italy (28.1 percent),'' stated Pletikosa.

''This event brings together and promotes prosciutto producers from all over the country, whose products are protected by a stamp of designation of origin, and labels of geographical origin (Krk, Dalmatian and Drniš prosciutto) at the EU level,'' stated the Croatian Chamber of Commerce (HGK).

Quality labels for consumers guarantee the purchase of authentic and properly controlled products, with recognised quality and a local origin. Protecting products without educating consumers and business partners about its proper valuation has no great benefit. Therefore, this event contributes to the strengthening of the recognisability of these Croatian meat products with higher added value and a better market positioning, all with the aim of developing the wider Croatian economy.

Make sure to follow our dedicated business and Made in Croatia pages for much more.

Tuesday, 26 February 2019

Could Croatian Meat Products Open Profitable Export Door to China?

By-products from Croatian slaughterhouses could potentially have some good buyers in China. What Croatia considers to be meat by-products are valued delicacies over in China, and exporting them could open up a potentially highly profitable door.

As Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 26th of February, 2019, the Chinese are happy with what they've seen, and according to the Croatian Chamber of Commerce (HGK), ''we're now awaiting the final findings to sign a bilateral agreement.'' These comments come after Dukat and Vindija, as well as several farms and other competent Croatian institutions were recently visited by a Chinese deligation following the organisation of a visit by the Ministry of Agriculture and HGK.

As Vecernji list writes, the reason appears to be that milk and dairy products over in China are becoming more and more sought after and sell at a very good price, so along with the construction of Pelješac bridge, cooperation can now also be expected in terms of agriculture and food, such as via the potentially very profitable export of top quality Croatian cheeses and dairy products.

In addition to this potential wealth of profit, all eyes are currently also on the recent visit of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Agriculture Tomislav Tolušić to China. Branko Bobetić, the director of Croatiastočar, says the total export of agricultural and food products in the EU from December 2017 to November 2018 stood at 115 billion euros, of which 11 billion was from China.

''Of that [amount] 2.2 billion euro is made up of meat and meat products from the EU, and 1.3 billion is from milk and dairy products, and as total imports of agricultural and food products from China into the EU amounted to 5.7 billion, EU exports are twice as big as imports are,'' stated Bobetić. The bulk of these meat exports are, of course, pork, and as China desires exactly the products Croatia considers to be by-products, there is a big chance there.

''Pigs' heads, bones, stomachs, ears, innards... they are delicaies there. So far, we've exported some of it to Hong Kong at an average price of 1.25 euro, while on the Chinese market, which is still closed for by-products from our slaughterhouses, such products have reached twice the price,'' said Bobetić, pointing out that based on the estimation of the amount of pigs which end up in Croatia's biggest slaughterhouses each year, there were about 5-6 thousand tons of pork by-products worth at least seven million euros in exports.

Make sure to follow our dedicated business page for more information on Croatian relations with China.

Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Croatian Exports to Canada Doubled in First Nine Months of 2018

As Lucija Spiljak/Poslovni Dnevnik writes on the 16th of January, 2019, the Republic of Croatia was the third EU member country to ratify the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union in 2017, opening up new opportunities for both Canadian and Croatian entrepreneurs and innovators, as well as promoting and increasing trade and economic development. Owing to that, Croatian exports to Canada doubled in 2018.

In addition to the abolition of customs duties for more than 98 percent of goods, according to data from the Croatian Chamber of Commerce (HGK) and state statistics, in the first nine months of last year, Croatian exports to Canada doubled to almost 80 million dollars.

This encouraging information was stated at Zagreb's Sheraton Hotel when marking the first anniversary of the implementation of the CETA agreement, in which Canada's Geoff Regan participated. The gathering at the Sheraton was organised by the Canadian Embassy and the Canadian-Croatian Business Network (CCBN).

As the President of the Croatian Chamber of Economy Luka Burilović pointed out, tariffs were abolished on some of the most important Croatian exports - food and pharmaceuticals.

"The possibilities are numerous and Croatian companies need to be proactive in taking advantage of all the advantages now offered by the Canadian market," Burilović stated.

The CETA agreement brings some enormous savings to entrepreneurs, and they are estimated at about 600 million euro. In addition to the abolition of tariff items, this agreement is an instrument for growth and a tool to promote European values, thus contributing to the betterment of everyone.

In addition to the Canadians wanting to invest in Croatia, an increase of over 25 percent of visits made by Canadians to the Republic of Croatia was recorded last year.

On the occasion of the gathering and the welcome news about Croatian exports to Canada, Croatian Parliament Speaker Gordan Jandroković also mentioned NATO, whose role was significant in the development of Croatian-Canadian relations because that way, as he stated, Croatia and Canada recognised and respected each other.

"The CETA agreement shows how states can help each other and contribute to their economies," Jandroković pointed out.

Geoff Regan of Canada's House of Representatives, said that Canada wants to increase its trade and investment with EU countries, including Croatia, which, he said, is an important trading and investment partner. He also mentioned that according to unofficial estimates in Canada there are 300,000 people there with Croatian roots, so the Croatian diaspora contributes to the strengthening of economic relations between Canada and Croatia.

"The comprehensive economic and trade agreement between Canada and the European Union is an important tool to help increase trade and investment with EU countries. By ensuring that businesses and people can maximally use the opportunities for increased trade that CETA will help to achieve, Canada and EU countries will establish lasting foundations based on a growing relationship which will contribute to our common progress,'' Regan concluded.

The 27th anniversary of Croatia's international recognition and Croatia's diplomatic recognition from Canada were also marked at the gathering in Zagreb.

Make sure to follow out dedicated business and politics pages for more information on Croatian exports, and much more.

 

Click here for the original article by Lucija Spiljak for Poslovni Dnevnik

Page 1 of 3

Search