Saturday, 27 November 2021

October Blues: Imagine the Global Economy Had a Dalmatian Work Ethic

November 27, 2021 - Some in Dalmatia want winter tourism, others are exhausted after the season. How would things look if the global economy adopted the Dalmatian work ethic? 

I love Dalmatia.

I love Dalmatians. Hell, I married one, and she is as lovely as ever, as well as one of the most dedicated and hard-working people I know. 

My wife got that work ethic from her father, who is from the village of Brusje on the island of Hvar. One of ten kids, there was never money for anything, and the 12-kilimetre round-trip walk to school in Hvar Town each day certainly kept him fit. Without ever taking a kuna of credit in his life, he managed to buy land in the most prime part of Jelsa, build a 4-storey house and put all four kids through university, while at the same time spending hours in the family field each day, supplying the family with much of its food. 

Total respect, and I am only sorry that he did not get a proper son-in-law who loved to spend time in the field and not on a laptop, or at least one who adored blitva... 

When people say that Dalmatians are lazy, I always smile and think of my father-in-law, who is always on the road about 5 am each day to tend to the field before his daily chores. I think of the many Dalmatians who left the country in the 19th century, who emigrated out of economic necessity with little more than the shirts on their backs and went on to build incredible businesses and new lives in countries where initially they did not even speak the language. Seriously impressive stuff, and I read somewhere that if the Croatian diaspora was its own country, it would be one of the richest in the world in terms of GDP. 

And yet... 

I know I am going to get slaughtered on social media for this article (particularly by those who don't read beyond the title), and I am ok with that. When you have a double lawsuit ongoing from the Kingdom of Accidental Tourism, a little additional social media abuse it like water off a duck's back. 

I am also aware that nothing will change with anything that I write, for a learned a long time ago that there is a reason that Dalmatia seems to be a little slower in time, without all the latest brand stores and latest technology - the locals like it that way. Like many foreigners coming to Dlamatia over the years, I used to get frustrated at the lack of local interest in embracing change and things that I called 'progress'. The reason these things did not exist were because locals did not want them. It took me 15 years but I managed to condense my advice to incoming foreigners into one sentence. If they could accept and live by this sentence from day one, they would truly have found paradise. But if - like me - you spend years fighting against that sentence before finally accepting its truth, a long period of frustration ensued. The sentence is this:

Do not try and change Dalmatia, but expect Dalmatia to change you. 

Dalmatia definitely changed me - for the better - and I long ago gave up trying to change Damlatia. But there is one small area where I think I can contribute to a small change  that I think would be beneficial to all, and it is one which divides locals. 

Winter tourism. 

Not many people know that organised tourism in Europe began in Dalmatia. 

With a focus on the winter. 

The founding of the Hvar Health Society in 1868 attracted convalescing aristocrats in the Austro-Hungarian Empire to rest in the temperate climes of the island known as the Austrian Madeira. Even as late as 1990, winter tourism was rocking, with Americans coming for up to 6 weeks for the art, nature, food and wine - read this fascinating interview with a UK tour rep based here from 1986-91. Croatian Winter Tourism in 1990: Full of Life! Tour Rep Interview.

The issue of winter tourism comes up each year, and I always smile at the responses. We are tired, we have worked so hard in the season. We made enough in the season, we don't want it. I have to attend to my olives and fields etc. It is October after all, and the season has now been a full six months. 

While I used to smile at this more when I actually lived in Dalmatia, it is somehow a little less amusing living in continental Croatia, where people work equally as hard, usually without the benefit of lucrative tourism that happens accidentally, and they have to slog it out 12 months to survive. 

But that I guess is one of the joys of being born a Damatian in Dalmatia - it really is God's own paradise. 

The thing is, though, that this seasonality is - at least in the humble opinion of this foreigner, if he is allowed one - is that it is really affecting the quality of life in Dalmatia, and I think this seasonality is becoming a real issue. Living on Hvar was an incredible experience, and running TCN kept me shielded from the extremes due to the interesting assignments that constantly popped up. But the reality is that during the season, most people are working 5 jobs to make the most they can in the season, and in the winter, there is nothing open to enjoy. 

I was in both Osijek and Split this month, and there is no question which is the better city to live in during the winter. And it is not the Dalmatian capital. Split SHOULD be one of the top cities in Europe for lifestyle. It has so much to offer, and it has the potential to be one of the most attractive remote work destinations in Europe. And yet sadly, it is showing signs of esging towards overtourism in summer and a strangulation of life in winter. It really doesn't need to be that way. 

One of the most interesting points in TCN's recent winter tourism initiative (which has led to the Split winter tourism round table with Mayor Puljak and others on December 13), was in this great interivew with the team from The Daltonist, who lament the lack of local life in town. This is detrminental both to tourism, as people want to exeprience the local vibe (did I mention Osijek?), but also it is not that much fun for locals either. 

Not all people want to work all year in Dalmatia. And that is fine - that is one part of the essence of the Dalmatian lifestyle. But others do. Why not look at rather than working 12 hours a day 7 days a week for a seasonal worker, who is then unemployed during the winter, perhaps closing for a day or even two each week to give the staff a chance to breathe and enjoy life a little. At the same time, work with others to develop content and local life, so that things are open longer. By moving away from seasonality, workers can be given permanent contracts, find stability and become invested in the company's success. 

And there would be life in winter. And that would be a win for both tourists and locals. 

And creating content and fun out of season need not be that complicated or successful. Build it and they will come. Check out Nomad Table by Saltwater Nomads at Zinfandel each Friday through the winter in Split. A sell-out each week. 

But imagine that Damatian work ethic of only working for half the year was applied to the global economy. Those Wall Street brokers and the like who work 50 weeks a year so that they afford the fortnight in Croatia on the Dalmatian coast - now working for just 26 weeks and staying home, with the appropriate mild negative effect on Dalmatian tourism. In fact, if all of Dalmatia's visitors only worked half a year, how many would be able to afford to come to Dalmatia at all? 

The difference is, of course, that they are not Dalmatian, living in God's Own Paradise. 

 

Do not try and change Dalmatia, but expect Dalmatia to change you. But build in a little winter tourism for those who want it - it will improve the quality of life all round. 

Read more about the Split Winter Tourism initiative, which will take place on December 13. 

Monday, 8 November 2021

Did You Know These Lesser Known Facts About Dalmatian-Venetian Relations?

November the 8th, 2021 - Dalmatia and Venice have had quite the tumultuous relationship over the last few, well, thousand years or so, but did you know these lesser known facts about Dalmatian-Venetian relations? Put yourself to the test!

As Morski/Gordana Igrec writes, Dalmatian-Venetian relations used to be extremely complicated in the past, with trade issues and jealousy when it came to the former Dubrovnik Republic, which was once its own state, dominating. Their structure and relationship changed over time. Here are some lesser known facts.

Back in 1553, the Venetian representative Giovanni Battista Gistuiniani, when travelling through Dalmatia, wrote the following for Sibenik: ''the costumes of the inhabitants, their speech and their customs... everything is Croatian. All of the women dress in a Croatian style and almost none of them can speak Italian!''

For Trogir, he wrote: ''the population of this city lives according to Croatian customs. It's true that some of them dress in the Italian way, but these examples are rare. Everyone can speak Italian, but they still speak Croatian in their homes, and that's because of the women, because few of them understand Italian, and if they do understand it, they won't speak any language other than their mother tongue. The nuns in Sibenik, as well as others across Dalmatia, speak only in Croatian.''

When Venice took over Dalmatian cities, it didn't allow the clergy access to the great noble council, nor to the popular assemblies. (According to today's interpretation of that decision, the clergy had no influence on public and political life at the time.)

Back in the 15th century, there were bloody conflicts between nobles and commoners in Split, Trogir, Hvar and Sibenik.

There were no serfs in Dalmatia for the Venetian authorities! People were divided into nobles and commoners. Back in the 16th century, the bourgeoisie began to form in some Dalmatian cities.

Venice dealt Dalmatia the hardest blow when on January the 15th, 1452, its Government ordered that all merchandise in Dalmatia must be exported only to Venice and to no other place.

Even before the arrival and subsequent takeover of the Venetian Government, Dalmatian cities almost all had public schools.

In 1848, Emperor Ferdinand issued a patent granting freedom of the press, determined the National Guard and the convocation of deputies of the provincial estates so that all of them together could draft the Constitution which he had determined. Dalmatian intellectuals then enthusiastically accepted the idea of ​​the Habsburg emperor.

While the continental Croatian city of Varazdin, far from Dalmatia, was under the Habsburg monarchy, the capital of Croatia sought the accession of Dalmatia to Croatia, because it once belonged to it. A similar law was passed by the City of Zagreb on the same day, emphasising that: "Dalmatia belongs to Croatia by law, history and people."

For more on Croatian history, check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

Friday, 15 October 2021

Omiš in Autumn, the Perfect Time to Visit Mountains, the Cetina and the Sea

October 15, 2021 – With local seafood currently at its best and cooler temperatures inviting runners, hikers and cyclists to this spectacular location, Omiš in autumn is one of the best destinations of the season.

When temperatures cool on the Croatian coast, the telltale signs of tourism start to fade. Villages that were full of people in summer become very still. Only in the larger places does life go on unaffected.

The seaside city of Omiš is one such place. The charming Omiš Old Town streets hold their special atmosphere throughout the year. Autumn, in particular, is a favourite time for visitors to come.

IMG_3546sdfghjk.JPGEarthenware shades of rooftops in Omiš Old Town © Marc Rowlands

Arguably, this is the time of year when Omiš's famous and distinct cuisine is at its best. Omiš's special bounty of seafood comes from its position on the Cetina river. The best-tasting Mediterranean fish and shellfish love these conditions, where the freshwater meets the saltwater. And, in autumn, the prawns, scampi and calamari are at their biggest and best. The restaurants of Omiš offer fresh, seasonal specialties every day. Their tables are taken by relaxed visitors from all over the region, drawn to the city now the summertime rush has subsided.

IMG_6040sdfghjklo.jpegSeafood is an autumn specialty at sister Omiš restaurants Puljiz and Bastion. © Marc Rowlands

But, in the hills above and behind Omiš, and along the long promenades of the Omiš riviera, different kinds of visitors can be found. The cooler temperatures of autumn are perfect for cycling, running, hiking and walking.

edfgbhnjmh.JPGStarigrad Fortress, Omiš © Marc Rowlands

Sitting 262 metres above the city, the 15th century Starigrad Fortress is a mildly challenging hike. But, even older children can easily manage it. And the views from the top are incredibly rewarding. Autumn's cooling winds blow along the water surface, cleaning the vista. You can see so much detail on the islands opposite Omiš when the air quality is like this.

For those who prefer sport and recreation of a different kind, autumn in Omiš holds four of the city's most eagerly anticipated challenges

Omiš in Autumn: Dalmatia Ultra Trail

Dalmatia_Ultra_Trailrfvbhnjk.jpgOmiš in Autumn © Dalmatia Ultra Trail

With between 60% and 80% of its entrants coming from overseas, Dalmatia Ultra Trail is among the most internationally famous of all Croatia's cross country runs. And for good reason. The scenery is spectacular. There are three route options, allowing the race to be accessible to runners of varying abilities.

Mountain Dut

Starting from the Roman town of Solin, just north of Split, Mountain Dut is the biggest challenge of this Dalmatia Ultra Trail. On a course with a total distance of 122 km, runners will ascend to Putalj and Klis, site of the famous fortress, crossing along the Dinaric Alps before dropping down to Gata in the Omiš hinterland. From there, they drop down into the spectacular Cetina river valley and run parallel to the river until Kostanje.

wedfgvbhjnmk.JPGIn the hills near the village of Gata, Ivan Meštrović's statue of Mila Gojsalić overlooks the Cetina river and Omiš © Marc Rowlands

Returning up into the hills to visit the traditional village of Zadvarje, the trail next takes runners down to beautiful Brela. Runners will pass by beautiful Brela beaches, then those of the Omiš riviera villages Pisak, Marušići, Mimice and Medići. Then, it's back up to the final stretch of hills, visiting the old village of Lokva Rogoznica on the way, before finally descending to Omiš.

Mountain Dut 2021 starts on Friday 15th October at 9pm from Solin. Trail runners have 32 hours to complete the course. Each finisher will be awarded with 5 ITRA qualification points.

Dalmatia_Ultra_Trailf.jpgOmiš in Autumn © Dalmatia Ultra Trail

Sea Dut

At 56km in length, Sea Dut offers a challenging trail set before the entire Makarska and Omiš riviera coastline. Starting in Makarska, runners rise up to the village of Kotišina, famous for its botanical gardens and castle. Thereafter, they ascend Biokovo mountain, the trail reaching almost 875 metres above sea level. They stay atop the hills all the way to Brela, where they drop down to the beach. Thereafter, they take the same course as Mountain Dut, past Pisak, Marušići, Mimice and Medići, up to Lokva Rogoznica, then down to Omiš.

Sea Dut 2021 starts on Saturday 16th October at 8am from Makarska. Trail runners have 15 hours to complete the course. Each finisher will be awarded with 3 ITRA qualification points.

tergdhgjfhkg.JPGDalmatia Ultra Trail visits some of the most traditional and timeless sections of the Omiš riviera © Marc Rowlands

Ethno Dut

With a total distance of 18km, Ethno Dut is the most accessible of the Dalmatia Ultra Trails here. Starting in Dugi Rat, runners make a moderate ascent into the hills of just under 400 metres above sea level. They maintain roughly the same altitude for the entire trail, passing Jesenice and Tugare, before dropping down into Omiš.

Ethno Dut 2021 starts on Saturday 16th October at 1pm from Dugi Rat. Trail runners have 5 hours to complete the course. Each finisher will be awarded with 1 ITRA qualification point.

Omiš in Autumn: Omiš Half Marathon

Omiš_Half_-_Marathonswdfrgtyhuj.jpgOmiš in Autumn © Omiš Half Marathon

With a backdrop of mountains and the Cetina river, the half marathon in Omiš is perhaps Croatia's most spectacular. Where else can you run a virtually flat course with such scenery accompanying you?

Of course, the striking route is facilitated by following the Cetina river canyon. When doing so, runners pass some of the best rafting, kayaking, trekking, hiking and free-climbing locations in Croatia.

In 2021, the event again has two races - the half marathon and a recreational 6 kilometre race. Both take place within the Cetina river canyon.

Omiš_Half_-_Marathonsdfghn.jpg© Omiš Half Marathon

The Omiš Half Marathon takes place on Saturday 23rd October 2021.

You can register here and entries will be accepted in person between 8 am - 9 am on the day of the race. For more details, check the event's Facebook page.

UEFA Futsal Champions League 2021

244202666_2964388060467686_6950115119302343745_n.jpgZeleno Plavi © MNK Olmissum

With the tournament celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2021, there's no better time for the Fifa accredited UEFA Futsal Champions League to be coming to Omiš. Better still, the hometown Futsal team, MNK Olmissum are the current national champions. They won both the cup and the league in the 2020/2021 season!

MNK_Olmissumdf.jpgChampions! © MNK Olmissum

It's been two decades since a Croatian team reached the semi-finals of the tournament. Currently, MNK Olmissum are ranked within the top 16 of all European futsal clubs. To proceed in the competition, the hometown heroes will have to come top of their group. They face opponents Leo (Armenia), Diamant Linz (Austria) and KMF FON (Serbia). They will host the group at their home ground of Ribnjak, Omiš between October 26 and 31. The matches will be televised, but what better way to enjoy than in-person?

Omiš in Autumn: Dalmatian Trail League - Mosor Grebbening

GrebMarko_Hermansdfghjk.jpg© Marko Herman

The spectacular section of the Dinaric Alps that lies to the west of Omiš is known as Mosor. It starts near Klis, above Split, and runs to the Cetina river. Mosor Grebbening is a series of trail runs through this epic mountain terrain. In 2021, it is the 9th round of the famous Dalmatian Trail League.

The event contains a choice of three adult trails and one children's race. All of the races start or end in the village of Gata, in the Omiš hinterland.

Mosor_GrebbeningdfgvbhIvo_Pešić_Golub.jpg© Ivo Pešić

Starting in Klis and finishing in Gata, Sivonja is the toughest trail. It is 37.50km in length and has a 2590m ascent. Runners have 12 hours to complete the course.

Still a tough ask, Tovar is the slightly easier choice. At 17km and with an ascent of 1270m, you're given 8 hours to complete the trail.

At 8 kilometres in length and with a 400 metre ascent, Pule is the most accessible race. It should take way less than the 4 hours allocated. The children's race is an 800 metre dash around Gata.

GrebMarko_Hermansdfghj.jpg© Marko Herman

Mosor Grebbening takes place on Saturday 13 November 2021.

Registration for the races: exclusively via the online registration form here.

Tuesday, 12 October 2021

Waste Separation in Dalmatia Lowest in Croatia, Split Worst

October 12, 2021 - Waste separation is traditionally lowest in southern Croatia, with the city of Split infamously known as the worst. 

Annual reports on waste collection in Croatia issued by the Ministry of Economic and Sustainable Development regularly present sad news about Dalmatia. Namely, it shows a severe civilizational lag in the south compared to the north, reports Slobodna Dalmacija.

Statistics show that Dalmatia, together with Lika and Brod-Posavina County, is at the bottom of Croatia when it comes to waste separation. But there is tourism here, and the state invests in infrastructure and development, so it makes no sense to compare it with poorer parts of Croatia and where life is objectively more challenging.

Data on waste separation collection in 2020 show that Split is in last place among the big cities in Dalmatia. Dubrovnik has a collection rate of 11.16 percent, followed by Sibenik, which last year still rose with a rate of 6.55 percent. On the other hand, Zadar fell from 7 percent to 6.20 percent last year, while Split is at the bottom of the scale with 5.80 percent. Compared to 2019, Split even improved because it had a disgraceful 3.74 percent two years ago, but even with that miserable shift, it did not move further than the last place.

Moreover, when we move outside the framework of Dalmatia, Split is convincingly in last place among the big cities in Croatia regarding waste separation. This year, Rijeka recorded 14.21 percent, while Zagreb separates 29.74 percent, and Osijek as much as 38.69 percent, which is an improvement from 28.67 percent in 2019.

The record holders are again in Međimurje. Čakovec is at 48.95 percent, and some of their municipalities, such as Belica, separate 79.76 percent of waste. In fact, in Međimurje County, eight municipalities separate more than 60 percent of waste, above the required EU standards.

In terms of municipal waste management, as in 2019, the highest rates of recovery and recycling of waste are still recorded in Međimurje County (58 percent), Varaždin County (53 percent) Koprivnica-Križevci County (50 percent), and the City of Zagreb (48 percent).

On the other hand, the counties where waste is least recycled are Zadar County (20 percent) and Lika-Senj County (20 percent). They are followed by Brod-Posavina (23 percent), Split-Dalmatia (24 percent), Šibenik-Knin (25 percent), and Dubrovnik-Neretva County (25 percent).

Another indicator that shows just how bad it is in Dalmatia is shown in the example of Zadar County, where most construction is currently underway in Croatia. Unfortunately, Zadar County is at the bottom of the scale and the most economically underdeveloped part of Croatia.

Most municipal waste in Croatia was disposed of in Zadar, in the Diklo area, as much as 320,905 tons. It should be emphasized that this is almost twice as much as Zagreb's Jakuševac, where 189,975 tons were disposed of, or Split's Karepovac, which is third on the list where 116,876 tons were disposed. Much less mixed municipal waste is disposed of in Zadar than in Zagreb and Split, but it is not explained what the 247,651.71 tons of 'other waste' disposed of in Diklo in 2020 refer to. 

The director of Zadar's "Čistoća" Ivan John Krstičević said that "this is a large amount of excavation that ends at two landfills in that landfill."

Last year, 103,015 tons of mixed municipal waste were disposed of in Karepovac; in fact, almost everything that ended up there falls into that category.

It cannot be said that nothing happens in Dalmatia when it comes to waste, but it is going very slowly. In Zadar, Diklo should stop being a landfill, fortunately for the surrounding locals, when the Biljana Donja Waste Management Center starts operating, and commissioning is expected in the middle of next year. At the end of this year, the CCE Bikarac should start trial work in Šibenik-Knin County.

Split is also at the bottom. The Center for Waste Management in Split-Dalmatia County in Lećevica has been questioned by associations, locals, and some scientists as environmentally unacceptable. Still, it is equally questionable whether it will ever be built. Big money was spent, jobs were created, people were employed in the county’s “Regional Clean Environment Center.” Some retired from that position, but nothing has moved in two decades without anyone responding.

Presenting the Municipal Waste Report at a press conference, Minister of Economy and Sustainable Development Tomislav Coric boasted that Croatia ended last year with 41 percent of separated municipal waste, saying it was an increase of four percent compared to 2019. But he noted that last year was a “pandemic year” marked by a reduction in the work of the service sector.

In other words, there was much less tourism last year than in previous years, so the results on that success are relative. This is especially true for Dalmatia. As a result, the amount of waste is smaller, but, unfortunately, the backlog in separation and recycling is equal.

In Split-Dalmatia County, there are five municipalities with no waste separation (i.e., 0.00 percent), namely Jelsa, Prgomet, Seget, Sućuraj, and Šolta, while Hrvace is at 0.05 percent of separation, and Muć at 0, 06 percent. According to them, Vrgorac is "advanced" with 0.16 percent.

In Šibenik-Knin County, Kistanje, Kijevo, Ervenik, Civljane, Murter and Promina are at "zero", and in Zadar County, Lišane Ostrovičke, Pakoštane, Polača, Povljana, Sali and Stankovici do not separate anything. In Dubrovnik-Neretva, the municipalities of Janjina, Kula Norinska, Lumbarda, Opuzen, Pojezerje, Smokvica, Ston, Zažablje are without separation.

Of course, there are brighter examples, like Lastovo, in Dubrovnik-Neretva County, which reached an incomprehensible 40.82 percent for Dalmatia. There, waste separation actions were initiated by associations, the Municipality of Lastovo, the local Komunalac, the Lastovo Islands Nature Park, and obviously, the results were not lacking. For several years in a row in Split-Dalmatia County, Omiš has been praised. This year, it reached 20.70 percent, and Dugi Rat equaled it, which, therefore, shares first place in the largest Dalmatian county.

But when you look at the waste management map in the report, it turns out that the northern regions are more advanced in waste recycling. For example, no southern part of Croatia has a composting plant. In fact, in the results for last year, we cannot say that tourism is an aggravating circumstance for Dalmatia, which otherwise produces a significant amount of waste because it was significantly less than in previous years.

It would be unfair to say that nothing is being done. Split has reduced the amount of waste disposed of at Karepovac, and compared to 2018; it has doubled the amount of waste collected separately from 1,614 to 3,136 tons. It has also increased the number of stationary and mobile recycling yards. But that’s all too little to avoid the penalties cities have to pay if they don’t reach specific recycling percentages.

Namely, according to the "Decree on Municipal Waste Management," cities and municipalities are obliged to pay an incentive fee for reducing the amount of mixed municipal waste. It is a measure that encourages local self-government units to reduce the amount of mixed municipal waste. As confirmed by the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency, the Fund collected HRK 46.9 million from municipalities and cities in Croatia last year because, in 2019, they did not separate enough mixed municipal waste. Thus, the City of Zagreb had to pay HRK 8.8 million, Osijek HRK 922 thousand, and Rijeka HRK 1.6 million. Of the Dalmatian cities, Split had to pay 3.2 million kuna, Zadar paid penalties of 1.6 million kuna, Šibenik 825 thousand kuna, and Dubrovnik 944 thousand kuna.

It is unknown how much Dalmatian and Croatian cities and municipalities will pay for 2020 because last year's data will be calculated at the end of 2021 after receiving a report from the relevant Ministry.

According to the World Bank, Croatia generally lags behind European waste management directives, so the question is whether it will avoid penalties that would amount to 42,000 euros a day. In 2020, Croatia was supposed to reach 50 percent separate separation, and last year the country ended up with 41 percent. However, it was a pandemic year, as Minister Ćorić admitted. Otherwise, it isn't easy to approach the set norms. For some, the question is whether Croatia will fulfill them, as is the case with Karepovac, given the "Lecevica case."

Since the population's education is emphasized as one of the goals, it is not out of place to know that Čistoća Split has spent around one million kuna on education in the last two years. 

Given that the new Split government, led by Mayor Ivica Puljak, has announced a cleaner Split as one of its strategic goals, we will see if Split can move from the infamous place of the worst city when it comes to waste management.

For more on lifestyle in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page

Sunday, 10 October 2021

Dalmatian Wine Icons: Taste the Best Dalmatian Wines

October 10, 2021 - Dalmatian Wine Icons is a prestigious wine event where Dalmatian winemakers present exclusively their best wines. It is a one-day promenade tasting that, due to its limited duration, winemakers from all parts of Dalmatia bring only one or a maximum of two labels, the ones they are most proud of.

Dalmatian Wine Icons is a prestigious wine event where Dalmatian winemakers present exclusively their best wines. It is a one-day promenade tasting that, due to its limited duration, winemakers from all parts of Dalmatia bring only one or a maximum of two labels, the ones they are most proud of, reports Turističke Priče.

244440255_3052908121657545_6563286874891307094_n.jpg

Photo: Dalmatian Wine Icons

By presenting only special wines, the so-called cellar flagships, winemakers want to draw the attention of the public and the media to the exceptional concentration of quality that is more than evident in Dalmatia in recent years, and then to varietal and stylistic diversity and wine authenticity.

Namely, in Croatia, no region has the varietal and stylistic richness of Dalmatia, because the number of indigenous varieties in Dalmatia exceeds the total number of indigenous varieties of all other regions together, and confirmation of the highest quality of Dalmatian wines comes from renowned international competitions such as British Decanter. more of the brightest medals than any other region from this part of Europe.

Therefore, the manifestation of the Dalmatian wine icon is an exciting event of an exclusive character where visitors are given the opportunity to taste in one place the most important wines of Dalmatia, which dissolve them and which the wine authors tell them personally.

Promenade tasting will be held on October 23 at the area restaurants Campus of the University of Split, and the event will be opened from 12 to 19 h.

The day before the promenade tasting, on October 22, wine workshops will be held in the same space, led by renowned lecturers - Branimir Vukšić, Manuela Plohl, Kruno Filipović, Monika Prović, and Saša Špiranec.

dalmatian-wine-icons-2.jpg

Photo: Dalmatian Wine Icons

Workshop program

Friday, 10/22/2021

  • 14: 00h Dalmatian rosé - Dalmatia is Croatian Provence; Branimir Vuksic
  • 15:30 Aged white wines of Dalmatia of collector's value; Monika Prović
  • 17: 00h Small varieties with great potential - indigenous varieties with the authentic stamp of Dalmatia; Kruno Filipović
  • 18:30 Plavac, babić and tribidrag / crljenak - three black locomotives; Saša Špiranec

Saturday, 10/23/2021

  • 14: 00h Decanter laureates - wine tasting that won gold and platinum medals at the last DWWA competition; Manuela Plohl

The complete organization and protocols are harmonized with sanitary and epidemiological standards, to make visitors feel safe.

Croatian wines and grapes are among the best in the world, and you can find more information about them in Total Croatia’s Guide to Croatian Wine HERE.

For more on lifestyle, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Friday, 1 October 2021

Arable Land Prices Increase by HRK 746 per Hectare on the Year

ZAGREB, 1 Oct 2021 - The average price of arable land in Croatia in 2020 amounted to HRK 25,930 per hectare, which is HRK 746 more than in 2019, the Croatian Bureau of Statistics (DZS) reported on Friday.

The statistics indicate that in 2020 the average price of meadows increased by HRK 3,326 to HRK 17,289 per hectare and of pastures by HRK 2,193 to HRK 15,651 per hectare.

In the Pannonian Croatia, the average price of arable land purchased in 2020 was HRK 26,416 per hectare, of meadows HRK 18,868 per hectare and of pastures HRK 10,720 per hectare.

The average price of arable land along the Adriatic coast was HRK 33,640 per hectare, of meadows HRK 13,957 per hectare and of pastures HRK 20,423 per hectare.

In northern Croatia, the average price of arable land was HRK 22,518 per hectare, the average price for meadows was HRK 18,981 per hectare and for pastures HRK 16,986 per hectare.

The DZS notes that its data is based on Tax Administration data on farmland purchases.

(€1 = HRK 7.491)

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Friday, 1 October 2021

New Bronze Sculpture of Šibenik Unveiled In the City

October 1st, 2021 - As in Zagreb, Split, and other Croatian cities, a new bronze sculpture of Šibenik has been officially unveiled and warmly received by city residents. It is a scale sculpture that serves as a miniature of the Dalmatian city, and now adds to its various attractions.

As reported by Slobodna Dalmacija, eight hundred kilograms of clay, 1.5 tons of bronze and almost two years of hard work, sculpting, studying the theory of space, mathematics, and geometry were all needed by the Zagreb painter-graphic artist with Šibenik address Zvonimir Vila to create his city plan in volume, a new bronze sculpture of Šibenik called Šibenik stina. It was placed on the square in front of Krešimir's home where the city administration is located, and it was ceremoniously opened on Wednesday night on the Day of the City of Šibenik.

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Photo: Dusko Jaramaz/PIXSELL

Other cities have models, mostly industrially processed, but Šibenik got a work of art, high relief, in fact, a sculpture of its historic city center that creates a story of space, brings emotion, and leads the viewer to the old Šibenik streets, rocks, thighs, and squares, points to its historical and cultural heritage as well as the very life of Šibenik, as the mayor of Šibenik Željko Burić said, satisfied that Šibenik is now a part of that life.

The creation of the sculpture, which Vila determined the dimensions of 4x2 meters on a pedestal about 60 centimeters high, was initiated by the Šibenik Tourist Board, and the money was provided from European funds.

''The goal was initially to make a model of the city center as our largest and most valuable resource and potential, as other cities have. However, we decided to give it to our Zvonimir Vila, who made a sculpture out of the model. The process was long, there were technical, financial, and administrative problems, and the pandemic bothered us. The new bronze sculpture of Šibenik is there now and I am overjoyed about it. Šibenik has gained another cultural value and tourist attraction'', said Dino Karađole, director of the Tourist Board.

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Photo: Dusko Jaramaz/PIXSELL

''I am glad to be in my city tonight and I just told the mayor that I don't recognize anything anymore. Whether it is good or not, I do not know, but I know that this sculpture, it is good that you call it that, and not a model, speaks of the spirit of Šibenik. However, why this sculpture on this day, the feast of St. Michael? Simply because saints personify cities. That symbiotic relationship between a saint and a city, an equation that has been confirmed in a thousand examples. What are St. Vlaho, St. Duje, St. Krševan to Dubrovnik, Split, Zadar, it is St. Mihovil to Šibenik. I think it is a happy choice that this work was given, not so much to the sculptor, but to the graphic artist, because he succeeded in what is most important in Šibenik, and that is the labyrinthine feeling you have in this city of incredible topography. If you were to make a model, 3D, 4D or as it is done today, you would get a good informative picture, but here you have a real work of art'', said the art historian dr. Sc. Josip Belamarić.

''I did this quite emotionally and hard. When I took the job, I knew it wasn’t easy, but it was challenging. The sculpture was made with the classical sculptural technique, first in clay, and later also with the classical method in bronze by his colleague Ante Jurkić, who did a great job of casting'', said Vila, the author, also thanking all of those who supported him in the arduous and long process of creation, especially many citizens and tourists peeking into his studio while he worked.

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Photo: Dusko Jaramaz/PIXSELL

Vila also admitted that he would have preferred his work, as originally planned, to be located in Poljana. Nothing is more logical, he says, than for the sculpture of the old town to be in the old town, and not outside its borders, although only 50 meters from Poljana. However, the authors of the architectural-urban project of arranging Poljana did not accept this proposal.

In any case, the people of Šibenik will not be bothered by the location of the new bronze sculpture of Šibenik. A large number of people came to discover the sculpture, and the strong congratulations to Vila and numerous selfies were taken on the first evening near Šibenik stina.

For everything you need to know about the historic city of Šibenik and all things you can do and see, be sure to check Total Croatia's guide: Šibenik in a Page. Now in your language!

For more made in Croatia news, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 4 August 2021

President Zoran Milanović Visits Wildfire Sites at Seget Gornji

ZAGREB, 4 Aug, 2021 - President Zoran Milanović, accompanied by Chief Firefighting Commander Slavko Tucaković, visited on Wednesday by helicopter locations devastated by wildfires at Seget Gornji, inland from the southern coastal town of Trogir, the President's Office said in a press release.

Before visiting the fire sites, Milanović discussed the situation at wildfire locations at Seget Gornji and in Mirlović in Šibenik-Knin County with local firefighting officials.

Firefighting representatives briefed the president about the efforts firefighters had made so far, and the assistance provided by the Croatian Army.

The president thanked the firemen and all those who helped put out the wildfires.

For more about politics in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Thursday, 22 July 2021

Construction of €11.6m Harbor in Omiš to Start in Mid-September

ZAGREB, 22 July  (Hina) - The construction of a town harbor in Omiš, east of Split, will begin in mid-September, and the implementation of this HRK 87 million project will take three and a half years.

The document signing ceremony for the launch of the project was held in Omiš on Thursday.

In attendance was Sea and Transport Minister Oleg Butković, who said that 85% of the costs of the project would be covered by funds from the European Union.

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HINA/Mario Strmotić

The project includes building a primary breakwater and a new promenade, and a new traffic solution.

Currently, about HRK 2 billion is being invested in the projects concerning seaport infrastructure along the coast, a record high investment in this segment in the last 100 years, the minister said.

He commented on efforts to ensure a smooth traffic flow from Solin via Split to Omiš, a route that experiences traffic congestion in the summer, saying that this would also be one of the main Croatian projects in the new EU financial perspective.

The head of the Split-Dalmatia County Port Authority, Domagoj Maroević, said that the new project would provide Omiš with an additional 8,000 square meters of seafront plus 70 berths, as well as space for boats owned by locals.

Mayor Ivo Tomasović said this was a historic day for Omiš, stressing that the new harbor will also enable a connection between Omiš and the nearby islands.

For more news about Croatia, click here.

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