Tuesday, 2 August 2022

New, Fourth Mammoth Tooth Found in Mohovo near Ilok

August 2, 2022 – Maybe you have never heard of Mohovo, and maybe you know that they keep finding mammoth teeth there... There is really no in-between. A new, fourth mammoth tooth was found on Saturday, 30th July. 

As SiB reports, ten years after he found the first mammoth tooth in his village, Goran Popović from Mohovo found another, fourth, mammoth tooth on Saturday.

He informed his friends and the public about the phenomenal discovery by posting on Facebook, stating that he was filled with happiness, emotions, and optimism.

"I had that instinct again, walked through our beautiful village, and then it happened – the fourth mammoth tooth. All of a sudden, a part of the hill collapsed and the tooth just popped out. Now I'm completely convinced that this is no longer a coincidence", he wrote and invited everyone to join in and help, because a lot of support is needed to start the systematic search of the location.

SiB spoke about this discovery with Goran, who, still under a strong impression, said that not a single find was the result of purposeful digging and searching, but that he found each tooth completely by accident.

goranizubsmamuta.png

Photos by Dolina Mamuta

“Last year, the Minister of Culture, Nina Obuljen Koržinek, visited the site of the discovery, the county and city authorities came, and we received promises from all of them that they would do everything in their power to start archaeological research. I know that the activities in the wider Vukovar area focus on Vučedol, but I believe that the finding of another tooth will motivate the authorities to pay attention to Mohovo as well. It would be an important step in the promotion of our small village and it would certainly make it more attractive not only in terms of archeology but also in terms of culture and tourism”, said Popović.

The relevant ministry and the Ilok City Museum were immediately informed about the discovery, as well as the City of Ilok, and the Vukovar-Srijem County. He emphasized that this place with only two hundred inhabitants obviously hides great secrets that experts need to investigate. It all started in the fall of 2012 when, while digging a septic tank in an orchard, he found the first fossil remains of a woolly mammoth, and a discovery was made four years later in another location. Goran states that short research, in addition to the woolly mammoth and the woolly rhinoceros, led to the discovery of fossil remains of a hyena, a wild horse, and a bison. Four years after the second discovery, there was a third one, when the fossil remains of a mammoth were found again near the village pond. Realizing the potential hidden in their village, several young residents of Mohovo founded the association Dolina Mamuta (Mammoth Valley). They organised workshops, installed a straw sculpture of a woolly mammoth, a woolly rhinoceros, and a hyena in the village centre, and launched the events "Advent in Mohovo" and "Mammothfest", the second edition of which is planned for this October.

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Photo by Dolina Mamuta

“The creation of a sculpture made of solid material is nearing completion, for which we were provided funds through donations after the straw sculpture was destroyed in a fire.

For the second "Mammothfest", we plan to organize an exhibition about the findings so far and additionally motivate the authorities for systematic research” he stated.

For more, check out our lifestyle section.

Friday, 18 February 2022

4th Century Coins Found on Ugljan Island

February 18th, 2022 - Archaeological research was conducted on St. Michael's fortress on Ugljan island, which is set to become a tourist attraction dedicated to the cultural heritage of all Zadar islands

Archaeological research has been underway at St. Michael's fortress on Ugljan island for several years now. During the third excavation campaign, archaeologists found modern, medieval and late antique coins, as well as 14 fragments of stone sculpture.

As reported by Naši Školji, a small amount of archaeological material was collected, mostly ceramics, which will be stored at the Archaeological Museum in Zadar after preliminary processing and analysis.

Research was conducted by the company Arheolog d.o.o. from November 3rd to December 8th, 2021. Archaeologist Damir Martinov, head of the company that carried out the work, explained that the recent research provided valuable insight into the stratigraphy and chronology of the embankment on the south-west side of the fortress, which once used to house the church of St. Michael. 

‘Several layers of the embankment have been documented, dating to different periods. The two upper layers of the embankment were formed during the 20th century, as evidenced by the remnants of various materials from recent history. The thick upper embankment on the southern side, made of stone and soil, was consolidated by a dry stone wall, and was made by demolishing the ruinous Romanesque-Gothic church of St. Michael after World War II. Inside the embankment, thirteen stone artefacts from the church were found (fragments of pillars, lintels, capitals, consoles, arch openings, etc.). The lower, thinner embankment layer probably formed during the first half of the 20th century’, explained Martinov.

One of the embankment layers dates to the early modern era, i.e. between the 16th and the 18th centuries. Three layers date to late middle ages; a silver Venetian coin was found in one of the layers, minted for the Doge of Venice Andrea Dandolo (1343-1354).

In another late medieval layer, researchers discovered late antique coins dating to the first half of the 4th century - a significant find that points to activity on the site in late antiquity.

A captain's house dating to the 1400s was also discovered at the fortress during an earlier research campaign. 

‘Archaeological research was conducted as part of the reconstruction and revitalization of St. Michael's fortress, which is a protected cultural asset of the Republic of Croatia and is supposed to contribute to the sustainable economic development of Ugljan and Pašman islands, as well as development of cultural and active tourism. A project for the reconstruction of the fortress will be developed based on the results of the archaeological research. So far, a geodetic study and geodetic survey, a conservation study and an architectural survey of the fortress have been completed’, said Preko Mayor.

There are big plans for the fortress of St. Michael, which is supposed to become a so-called Castle of Island Stories, an interpretation center that will introduce visitors to the heritage of all Zadar islands.

Research was conducted by archaeologists Damir Martinov, Domagoj Maurin and Dominik Kelava of the company Arheolog, in collaboration with archaeology students Pio Domines Peter, Domagoj Knez, Luka Žarković, Eugen Fritz Prgomet and Leona Valenta. The experts were assisted by four workers from Ugljan.

Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Croatia-Slovakia Scientific Cooperation: Conference in Zadar Continues Academic Friendship

June 30, 2021 - In 2019, an agreement was reached on the start of the Croatia-Slovakia scientific cooperation. The June 18 conference held at the University of Zadar presented the current progress in that agreement.

Along with countries such as Serbia, Slovenia, and Northern Macedonia, Croatia is a south Slavic country. The former Socialistic Federation of Yugoslavia got its name because of southern Slavs, a branch of Slavs, ethnolinguistic groups that arrived in Europe along with many other groups in what history remembers as the „Migration Period“, when Europe was dominated by the Western Roman Empire.

Other Slavic countries include Russia, Poland, Bulgaria (also south-slave, but not part of Yugoslavia), Czech Republic, Ukraine, Belarus, and also West Slavic country, Slovakia.

Sharing ethical and cultural heritage and diplomatic relations (formed on March 1, 1993), saw the intellectual cooperation with Slovakia raised on a high level and produced so much material, it required an entire scientific conference.

As reported by Ivo Pilar Social Research website, June 18 saw Zadar University host a conference „Intellectual relations of Croatia and Slovakia“, prepared by Slovakian-Croatian Board for Humanistic Sciences lead b professor Martin Homza from Comenius University in Bratislava and Ivo pilar Social Research Institute headmaster dr. Željko Holjevac.

The conference was supposed to be held last year but was canceled due to coronavirus, and the 2021 edition was managed in a hybrid model of the event, mixing live and online ways for participants to meet. Twelve Slovakian and Croatian scientists reported on the theme, and key Slovakian and Croatian players on the subjects of education attended and made speeches at the opening ceremony. This includes professor Zvjezdan Penezić, Zadar University's vice-chancellor. Peter Susko, Slovakian Ambassador in Croatia, Marián Zouhar, dean of the Bratislava's Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Staša Skenžić from Croatian Ministry of Science and Education, as well as Martina Klofáčova from the Slovakian Ministry of Science and Education.

„Slovakian-Croatian Board for Humanity Sciences is active since 2019 as part of the program of collaboration between two ministries for science and education with the goal of developing bilateral scientific and educating activities in the field of history, linguistics, Latinism, art history, ethnology, and archaeology“, informed Ivo Pilar Social Research Institute about the program goals.

Is there a Croatian diaspora in Slovakia? Yes. You can learn more about the Croatian diaspora on our TC page.

For more about science in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Friday, 14 May 2021

European Archaeology Days (EAD) at Archaeological Museum Zagreb from June 18-20

May 14, 2021 -The European Archaeology Days (EAD) at the Archaeological Museum Zagreb, held on June 18-20 and organised by the French Culture Ministry, and the French National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research (INRAP), brings all things archaeological to the Croatian capital.

The heavy blow of the 2020 Zagreb earthquake affected the Archaeological Museum Zagreb, as did the one back in 1880. However, as the Museum continued to stand the test of time past the 19th-century tragedy, it's great to see that it resisted last year's troubles as well. Not only is it open, but it will also host European Archaeology Days (EAD) for 2021 from June 18-20.

As the Museum's official website informs its readers, the goal of the manifestation is to popularise and present archaeology as a science, and the rich programme will include workshops, lectures, exhibitions, presentations of publications and projects, as well as expert guides, virtual content, and many other types of activities.

Archaeological departments of the highest educational institutions from Zagreb, Pula, Zadar as well as the Croatian Archaeological Society, the Croatian Archaeological Institute, Institute for underwater archaeology in Zadar, Kaptol county, and museums from Zadar, Sisak, Vinkovci, and Rijeka that are dedicated to the field of archaeology and history, are all partners of the event.

The organisers of this spectacle for anyone curious about mankind's past are the Culture Ministry of the French Republic and the French National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research (INRAP).

As a non-profit Organisation on Archaeological Open-Air Museums, Experimental Archaeology, Ancient Technology and Interpretation, EXARC reports on its website that EAD was established in France back in 2008 and coordinated by INRAP (The National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research), as a national event, but in 2019, the manifestation of this event opened up on a larger, European scale. Today, the EAD aspires to become a European concept that benefits the general public, museums, and culture.

Young as an international manifestation, it managed to be organised in 2020, but of course, under specific circumstances and with respect to all of the epidemiological measures. It was different but successful thanks to the 1,000 initiatives and 28 European countries taking part last year, all of them adapting to the virtual activities over physical ones.

''The EAD is a long weekend dedicated to archaeology in all its forms. We raise awareness and familiarise European audiences with all aspects of archaeology. A variety of events will be organised, aiming at engaging families, schools, students, history enthusiasts, museum visitors, as well as merely curious participants to discover this multifaceted discipline and their archaeological heritage.

Despite the challenging times that Europe is going through on several levels, there are still things that bring us together. Looking for common ground, for cohesion and reciprocity, while all countries continue to preserve their cultural identity and diversity, European Archaeology Days aim at sharing archaeological heritage throughout Europe and make culture accessible to all“ elaborated Exarc, on its website. They add that INRAP welcomes everybody wanting to take part in the manifestation to join and further enrich the programme.

It might be worth nothing what the difference between history and archaeology actually is. History focuses on written sources, while archaeology focuses on physical ones, such as items, but they both explore the past. For those wanting to learn more about how we as humankind progressed to the stage where we are at today, they can find joy in informing themselves about these respective fields.

Speaking of the old, the historical, and of course the physical, there are very many interesting sites across Croatia protected by UNESCO. Learn more on our TC page.

For more about science in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

 

Sunday, 25 October 2020

Croatian Archaeologists Remove WWII Engine from Seabed Near Zadar

October the 25th, 2020 - Croatia is full of history, and Croatian archaeologists are often coming across incredible examples and historical artefacts dotted up and down the coast, with the sea around Zadar often bearing fruit when it comes to modern history - particularly the Second World War.

As Morski writes, after finding a WWII engine on the seabed near Rivanj, Croatian archaeologists from the International Centre for Underwater Archeology in Zadar consulted aviation history experts Radovan Zivanovic Raus and Jurica Vucetic, who confirmed that this was indeed a very important find. Namely, it is a twelve-cylinder Rolls Royce Merlin engine, which, in addition to the famous Spitfire aircraft, was also installed in Hurricane aircraft.

Given that parts of the three propellers have been preserved on the engine, this is obviously a Hurricane. Historians believe that this is an aircraft that crashed in the Croatian Adriatic at some point during September 1944, but further research must confirm this thesis. They also expressed fears that this engine could be stolen by self-proclaimed underwater researchers and unscrupulous collectors and even smuggled outside of Croatian borders.

On Thursday, October the 22nd, 2020, Croatian archaeologists from MCPA Zadar, Roko Suric, Maja Kaleb and Luka Bekic, with the help of Djani Iglic from the Sveti Roko Bibinje diving club, successfully lifted the engine out of the sea with an underwater parachute and towed it to land, more specifically to the port of Rivanj. There, it was lifted by a truck crane and transferred to the City of Zadar. On Friday morning, it was successfully transported to the restoration workshop MCPA Zadar. There, it was taken over by the workshop leader Antonija Jozic, who will determine the strategy of how to best conserve the find.

We all hope that the restoration will go smoothly, so that this valuable engine, the only one to have been preserved in Croatia, will be deservedly exhibited at Sv. Nikola in Zadar, the future presentation centre of underwater archeology of MCPA Zadar.

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Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Zadar Museum Exhibits Roman Superstitions — And Lucky Penises

July 17, 2018 — If you’ve started off on the wrong foot, grab tight to your phallic amulet.

This will only make sense if you are an ancient Roman.

Or if you visit Zadar’s Archeological Museum this summer.

Thursday, 26 April 2018

2000 Year Old Amphorae Discovered in River Neretva

The river Neretva has been hiding some precious objects for two millennia 

Monday, 26 February 2018

Vižula Peninsula Entrance Closed for Archaeological Park Renovation

Medulin will up its game from sea and sunshine to history, culture and above all - archaeology.

Thursday, 30 November 2017

15.000 Year-Old Statuette Discovered on Dugi Otok

Meet Lili, the first Paleolithic depiction of the female form discovered in Croatia

Saturday, 30 September 2017

Archaeological Museum in the Works for Pridvorje!

A praiseworthy project for one tiny Konavle settlement...

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