Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Lunar New Year in Croatia: The Basics

January 26, 2022 - As strategic relations between Croatia and China have continued to grow from strength to strength, a look at the Lunar New Year in Croatia. 

Over the last decade, relations between China and Europe have warmed as a result of the Belt and Road Initiative, and the “16+1” mechanism between China and Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries.

Similarly, strategic relations between Croatia and China have continued to grow from strength to strength.

A side effect of these collaborative efforts is that more European countries including Croatia, are taking the opportunity to learn more about Chinese culture and incorporate them into their annual festivities. 

Within Chinese culture, there is no celebration more important than the Lunar New Year, taking place from February 1-14 this year.

Celebrations in Croatia

In 2016, the City of Zagreb kick-started the first Lunar New Year celebrations in Croatia by lining Josip Jelacic Square with 80 sculptures of terracotta Chinese warriors.

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Terracotta Warrior Sculptures 2016, image: Zagreb Tourism Board/Facebook

In 2018 the Zagreb Tourism Board (TZGZ) introduced week-long celebrations before COVID halted further festivities in subsequent years.

But what is Lunar New Year? How is it different from New Year on the 1st of January? And what are some of the traditions involved in the celebration?

Let’s take a brief look at some of the basics.

Lunar New Year 101

The Lunar New Year, also called Chinese New Year (after the world’s largest population of Lunar New Year celebrants), or Spring Festival (春节 Chūn jié). This event is also widely celebrated in places like China, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.

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Lunar New Year Celebrations in Thailand, image: Pixabay

In Korea, Lunar New Year celebrations are known as 설날 (Seollal), which lasts 3 days. While in Japan, the Meiji government phased out the use of the lunar calendar in 1873 to be more in line with the West, making celebrations a more muted affair.

Like Thanksgiving and Christmas, Lunar New Year is a time for families and friends to gather, catch up on the past year while consuming copious amounts of food and exchange gifts in the form of money-filled red envelopes (红包, hóng bāo).

Red is an auspicious color for the Lunar New Year, symbolizing happiness, passion, hope, vitality, and luck.

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Exchanging of Red Envelopes, image: Rodnae productions/Pexels

Celebrations begin on the first day of the lunisolar calendar, last 14 days, and concludes with the Lantern Festival (元宵节 Yuán xiāo jié). The day before Lunar New Year, families usually come together to partake in a reunion dinner (年夜饭 Nián yè fàn) to begin the festivities.

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Reunion Dinner, Image: Angela Roma/Pexels

What is the Lunisolar Calendar?

While the Gregorian calendar, the standard calendar used as the primary means of tracking time worldwide - is the official calendar in all countries that celebrate Lunar New Year, the lunisolar calendar still plays an important role in everyday life.

It determines when traditional holidays such as Lunar New Year, Lantern Festival (元宵节 Yuán xiāo jié), Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋节 Zhōng qiū jié) and Ancestors’ Day (清明节 Qīng míng jié).

Briefly speaking, the lunisolar calendar is a hybrid timekeeping method that accounts for both the earth’s orbit around the sun taking 365 days a year (i.e. Gregorian calendar) and the moon’s orbit around the earth (i.e. Lunar calendar).

On average, the moon’s synodic orbit around the earth takes 29.53 days which is then multiplied by the 12 lunar months. This adds up to approximately 354 days a year, 11 days shorter compared to the solar calendar.

To remedy this discrepancy, an additional 13th month is added to the lunisolar calendar once every 3 years. This once in three-year occurrence is known as (农历 nóng lì), or the agricultural calendar.

Since the lunisolar calendar is not in complete sync with the Gregorian calendar, Lunar New Year can fall anywhere within the months of January or February.

Due to this, the first day of Lunar New Year falls on February 1st this year, marking the beginning of the year of the Tiger.

In 2021, it fell on February 12th, welcoming the year of the Ox, while in 2020, January 25th marked the first day of the year of the Rat.

But why are there different animals for each year and what do these animals represent?

Chinese Zodiac

Each year in the lunisolar calendar is attributed to one of the repeating 12-year cycles of animals known as the Chinese zodiac.

In order, these zodiac animals begin with the Rat, followed by Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and ending with the Pig.

Each animal is also attributed with a set of traits that broadly categorizes the personalities of individuals born in that year.

For example, those born in the year of the Tiger are said to be independent and competitive yet have impetuous personalities. While those born in the year of the Ox are said to be diligent and honest, but with explosive personalities.

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12 Animals of the Chinese Zodiac, image: Pixabay

This zodiac is rooted in a legend dating back to the Qin dynasty in China that ruled over 2,000 years ago. The story goes that the Jade Emperor summoned all the animals within his Kingdom to take part in a great race towards the palace.

The first 12 animals to reach the palace were selected to be part of the zodiac, and the order in which they arrived determined their place.

Lunar New Year thus marks the transition from one animal to the next. 

Although this tradition is fading, the Chinese zodiac used to play a vital role in everyday life, determining one’s entire outlook for the year including career, finances, marriage compatibility, health, and more.

So, as we prepare to ring in the second Lunar New Year since the beginning of the pandemic, here’s to a healthy and prosperous Year of the Tiger!

For more, check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

30 Years of International Recognition: A Look at Croatia's European Integration

January 26, 2022 - On January 15, Croatia celebrated 30-years of international recognition, marking yet another milestone for a country that has undergone drastic reform in only three short decades. To fully appreciate the significance of this anniversary, one must first understand where Croatia was and how it achieved its current standing as one of Europe’s safest nations. A look at Croatia's European integration. 

A Bit of Background

Before we can discuss recent events in Croatian economic and foreign policy, we should look back a little further. Prior to succession from communist Yugoslavia, Croatia existed in many forms over the last several centuries. Lying at the crossroads of central Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Balkans, Croatia has a history that is as long and rich as its coastline. While it is difficult to pinpoint an exact date for the origins of Croatian nationhood, the elevation of the Dutchy of Croatia to kingdom status in 925 is a sufficient starting point. The Kingdom of Croatia maintained its independence until 1102 when it entered a personal union with Hungary, marking the beginning of over 800 years of foreign rule. 

The subsequent eight centuries were turbulent, to say the least. Large portions of Croat inhabited territory changed hands as regional powers like the Ottoman and Venetian empires vied for dominance in southeastern Europe. This situation persisted until between the late 18th and mid 19th centuries with the fall of Venice and the subsequent establishment of the Austro-Hungarian compromise in 1867. Following the dissolution of Austria-Hungary post-WWI, Croatia was incorporated into the short-lived Kingdom of Yugoslavia. After a brief stint as a Nazi puppet state during WWII, Croatia was reincorporated into the land of the south Slavs, giving birth to the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, a communist dictatorship that lasted for almost five decades. Independence was finally won after the Croatian War of Independence which ensued from 1991 to 1995. 

Recovery and Leading Up to EU Membership

Coming out of a brutal conflict, the impacts of war can still be felt today. Croatia had won its independence but at a significant cost. Thousands of lives were lost, and thousands more were displaced. In the years immediately following, a period of reconstruction began as damaged cities were rebuilt the state reconsolidated the institutions that had been damaged or destroyed during the war. Going into the 21st century, Croatia entered a period of shaky but upgraded stability and modest economic growth. Ties with the European Union improved and an application for membership was lodged in 2003. 

The road to EU accession was long and at times tedious. The Union required Croatia to agree to judicial reforms as well as cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. These issues became somewhat contentious at the time, delaying the opening of accession talks. Fortunately, they were resolved to the satisfaction of both parties, allowing negotiations to begin in 2005, hailing the beginning of Croatia’s European future. The next eight years were spent opening and closing the 35 chapters of the accession acquis. There was a brief ten-month delay due to the Piran Bay border dispute with Slovenia. But the restraints were eventually lifted, paving the road for Croatia’s EU membership in 2013.

European Integration: Croatia Today

Since 2013, Croatia has worked consistently to implement reforms that have firmly established it as a bona fide EU member. The right to freedom of movement probably represents the most significant change to the average Croatian’s life. EU states have the right to impose restrictions on new members. So, European labour market access has been one of the more obvious signs of progress within the union. Additionally, Switzerland granted Croatians equal residency and labour privileges, putting Croatia on par with other EU citizens in all associated countries. 

Furthermore, Croatia has made huge advances towards Schengen and Eurozone membership. In December of last year, prime minister Plenković announced that he expects final decisions on both application procedures in 2022. These treaties represent progress not only to Croatia but to the EU as a whole, providing fresh advances to a stagnating Europe.  

As Croatia moves further along the road of development, the small country will continue to face challenges. Only in the last few years, Croatia has had to manage rapid population decline, a migrant crisis, unusually frequent natural disasters, and a global pandemic. These stressors represent just a few examples of the trials that will test Croatian resilience in the years to come. 

But for now, Croatia should be proud of its achievements. Croatia has carved a crescent-shaped niche for itself on the world stage, going from a vague war-torn corner of southeastern Europe into a country renowned for its natural beauty, sports icons, and rich history. Croatia serves as an example for other western Balkan nations, showing that despite a complicated history, a bright future remains possible. So, wherever you may be reading this, as you contemplate Croatia’s 30-year anniversary, be considerate of the past, mindful of the future, and appreciative of the present. 

For more on politics in Croatia, follow TCN's dedicated page.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Ukraine Summons Croatian Ambassador Over Milanović's Statements

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - The Ukrainian Foreign Ministry summoned Croatian Ambassador Anica Džamić following Croatian President Zoran Milanović's statement that Ukraine does not belong in NATO.

Milanović said on Tuesday that Croatia would not have a military presence in Ukraine in the event of a Russian invasion, that the events in Ukraine of 2014, known as the Revolution of Dignity, were a military coup, that Europe had not done enough to assist Kyiv, and that the tensions on the Ukraine-Russia border were a consequence of the US home policy.

In a statement on Tuesday evening, the Ukrainian ministry said Milanović's statements in 2014 insulted the feelings of Ukrainians and foreign nationals who gave their lives for a European future.

Deep disappointment was expressed with the Croatian president's statement on Ukraine's NATO membership and the inappropriateness of assisting our country during the Russian aggression, the ministry said.

It was underlined that the statement was especially contradictory to human values given the bitter war experience of the Croatian people, it added.

The ministry finds that Milanović expressed contempt and ingratitude for the assistance Ukraine provided during Croatia's struggle for independence and in the fight against devastating wildfires last year.

At the same time, we are confident that this ingratitude is his personal trait and that it does not extend to the Croatian people, with whom we are linked by friendship and mutual respect, the ministry said.

It added that Milanović's statements suited Russian propaganda narratives, that they were not in line with Croatia's official position, that they harmed bilateral relations and undermined EU and NATO unity.

The ministry demands a public denial of the insulting statements and that they not be repeated in the future, and said that the Ukrainian ambassador would react in Zagreb.

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Parliament Speaker's Office Receives 1,000 Complaints in Past 4 Years

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - The office of the Parliament Speaker has received more than a thousand letters or petitions from citizens and office staff read each one individually and depending on their content, act accordingly.

"Admittedly, some letters do not require any action because they might just be a comment but we react by reading each one," the Parliament Speaker's office told Hina on Wednesday.

The statistics, however, indicate that in 2018 there were 403 petitions, in 2019 there were 293, in 2020 there were 247, and last year 176.

We assume the number decreased due to the coronavirus pandemic, the office said.

Citizens complain about various matters, mostly about the conduct of state and local government, health, welfare, judiciary, and many are not informed of the competencies of certain state institutions so they write to the Sabor.

In any case, the correspondence is forwarded to the competent bodies and we ask that they reply to the sender.

The office added that they also have some people who write regularly and not only to the Sabor but other institutions too.

Parliament  Speaker Gordan Jandroković confirmed on Tuesday that the Sabor receives petitions from citizens and added that he had investigated claims about an acquaintance of his concerning the state property rented to that acquaintance. Jandrokoivć added that he did not overstep his duties because he personally reacted to a complaint by a citizen which is something his office receives every day.

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Union Collective of Precarious Workers and Activists Registered

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022- The SKUPA union collective has been registered, comprising precarious workers and activists, and brings civil society workers together for the first time at the national level who will fight for workers' rights in associations, cooperatives, foundations, trade unions, and political parties.

SKUPA said on Wednesday it was established on 7 February and registered at the labor ministry on 5 January.

SKUPA empowers civil society workers and provides them with organized support in the fight for labor rights, dignified working conditions, and a better civil society, a press release said.

SKUPA will also fight for changing financing rules so that organizations financed via public calls can honor workers' rights.

It warns that since associations are non-profit organizations, they often can't pay severance in case of dismissal or pay for overtime work because these costs are not envisaged by any project.

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Travel Agencies Waiting for Decision on Extension of COVID Support Measures

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - Travel agencies in Croatia are still waiting for a decision by the competent authorities regarding the extension of job-keeping measures for the first few months of 2022, which was announced as a possibility at the end of 2021, UHPA said on Wednesday.

President of the Association of Croatian Travel Agencies (UHPA) Tomislav Fain said that their business is still jeopardized, their activities are still doubtful due to the pandemic, and turnover last year was only at 65% of that in 2019.

"We still do not have precise information about whether the measures will be extended for agencies or not. We hope they will because Labour Minister (Josip) Aladrović announced their extension at the end of 2021 for the most vulnerable activities and agencies certainly are. The new wave of the pandemic spreading at the start of 2022 is additionally hampering our business, there is hardly any or no work at all," Fain told Hina.

UHPA appealed for job-keeping measures to be extended for travel agencies which until now had encompassed about 3,000 travel agents.

Travel agencies have registered huge losses and decreased revenue. Their business is constantly uncertain which is evident in the results of a survey in which UHPA members said their revenue in 2021 was 65% of that in 2019.

This has also been confirmed by Croatian Bureau of Statistics figures showing that in the first nine months of 2021, revenue decreased by 65% compared with the same period of 2019, and if 2020 is compared with 2019, the decrease in revenue was even higher, more than 80%, said Fain.

"Due to the poor situation, we appeal to the government, the Ministry of Tourism and Sports and the Ministry of Labour, Pension System, Family and Social Policy to extend job-keeping measures for travel agencies in the coming months, starting from January 2022. That is the only way agencies will manage to keep their workers and somehow prepare for the coming spring-summer season," said Fain.

Last year's good results in tourism occurred primarily due to the better epidemiological situation and by no means as a sign of recovery of organized tourism trends, and the continuation of job-keeping measures for travel agencies continues to be a key condition for their recovery and survival, concluded Fain.

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Citizens Have Right to Call for Throwing Rotten Eggs at Politicians, MP Says

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - Citizens have the right to call for throwing rotten eggs at politicians, independent MP Karolina Vidović Krišto said on Wednesday, labeling the recent arrest of two men for allegedly threatening Prime Minister Andrej Plenković on Facebook as shameful acting out by those in power.

Last week's arrest of a 72-year-old who said Plenković "should be welcomed with rotten eggs" when he came to Zadar and a 49-year-old for calling Plenković a "baboon" was a shameful acting out by "corrupt ruling structures alienated from the people" and an antidemocratic act, the MP said in a statement.

"Croatian citizens are justified, in their helplessness and exposed to arrogant powerful structures, in having the right to call for throwing rotten eggs at politicians."

The ruling structures are openly breaking the law, getting rich illegally, corrupting the media, and running the judiciary, Vidović Krišto said.

She added that Plenković was "personally involved" in a "long list of corruption scandals," that he "has HRK 5 billion in his account, yet the government has not rebuilt even one house either in Banovina or in Zagreb" after the 2020 earthquakes, and that he "is a symbol of incompetence and the anti-democratic state of affairs."

The key political stakeholders, the key media, and the judiciary are insulting citizens on a daily basis by breaking the law, through tax plunder, and by destroying the health system, the MP said, asking "who will send Plenković and his supporters for police questioning for impoverishing Croatian citizens, destroying the legal system, and systematically emptying" Croatia.

(€1 = HRK 7.5)

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Pupils at Saint Petersburg School Can Learn Croatian

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - Pupils at School No691 in Saint Petersburg's Nevsky District can learn six foreign languages, including Croatian.

Since last year, the school with more than 1,500 pupils is home to the Croatian Club and wants to be an exclusive place in the city when it comes to Croatia and its language and culture.

Zagreb and Saint Petersburg have been friends since 1968 and their cooperation has covered various areas, including culture and education.

The cooperation gained new momentum in 2015 thanks to the Zagreb Russian Language and Culture Association and the enthusiasm of No691's headmistress Irina Leonidovna Karpicka, a big lover of Croatia.

Her students can learn Croatian three times a week for a month or two throughout the school year. The groups have numbered 15 to 20 students to date and they have been taught by volunteer Russianists and Croatists.

One of them is Mato Špekuljak, a Russian language and literature professor and president of the Russian Language and Culture Association, who has described School No691 as "one of the most beautiful and technically most equipped I have seen in my life."

The school is new and has a big library, a swimming pool, a toy museum, and computerized classrooms.

It has a Croatian library with some 300 books and multimedia content donated to the Croatian Club by the Zagreb Russian Language and Culture Association.

Other Russianists and Croatists from Zagreb have also guested in the school, including Russian language teachers at Zagreb's Trnjanska Primary School, which cooperates with School No691, as well as in Zagreb's Tin Ujević Primary School, which cooperates with School No351 in Saint Petersburg's Moskovsky District.

Besides the language, the students in the two Zagreb schools are also taught about Russia and its culture, and the students in the two Saint Petersburg schools about "Croatia as a friendly Slavic country," Špekuljak said.

The schools sometimes hold video conferences. "In Petersburg, that proved to be especially interesting to Russian students who spent summers in Croatia with their parents and those who are interested in football and admire the Croatian national football team and its successes," he added.

The Croatian-Russian school cooperation has been disrupted by COVID-19, but both sides hope it will resume and expand once the pandemic is over.

Headmistress Karpicka said one of the post-pandemic plans was to bring together the Croats living in Saint Petersburg and their families. Speaking to Hina, she invited all Russianists and Croatists from Croatia interested in volunteering in her school and making guest appearances in the Croatian Club to write at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Russian Language and Culture Association hopes the cooperation will expand between schools in Zagreb's Donji Grad and Trešnjevka districts and Saint Petersburg's Moskovsky and Novsky districts.

For more, check out our dedicated lifestyle section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

OECD Opens Membership Negotiations with Croatia

ZAGREB, 26 Jan 2022 - The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Tuesday it had opened accession discussions with Croatia, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Romania, and Bulgaria.

"There is no deadline for completion of the accession processes. The outcome and timeline depend on each candidate country’s capacity to adapt and adjust to align with the Organisation’s standards and best practices," the OECD said.

The process will include an in-depth evaluation by more than 20 technical committees of the candidates' alignment with OECD standards, policies, and practices.

"Croatia is ready to start OECD membership negotiations. Besides the Schengen Area and eurozone, our priority is OECD membership whereby we will strengthen our economy and Croatia's international standing and influence," Prime Minister Andrej Plenković said on Twitter.

The OECD's main values are individual liberty, democracy, the rule of law, the protection of human rights, and open, trading, competitive, sustainable and transparent market economies. The OECD also promotes sustainable and inclusive economic growth and climate change.

OECD Secretary-General Mathias Cormann pointed out that "candidate countries will be able to use the accession process to promote further reforms for the benefit of their people, while also strengthening the OECD as a like-minded community committed to a rules-based international order."

The technical reviews will focus on open trade and investment, public governance, anti-corruption efforts, and the effective protection of the environment and climate.

Once all the technical committees have completed their reviews, a final decision will be taken by unanimity of all OECD member countries.

For more, check out our dedicated politics section.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

New Cycling Information Center in Međimurje Includes a Unique Lookout Tower

January 26, 2022 - As part of the construction of the new Cycling Information Center on the hill of Mađerka, a lookout tower will accompany it to offer visitors a vantage point that will allow them to enjoy a privileged view of the natural beauties of Međimurje, and the bordering countries.

The works on the construction of the new Cycling Information Center with a lookout tower on the hill of Mađerka will be completed soon, reports HrTurizam.hr. The idea of ​​the lookout tower came from the choice of a location that can present the natural beauties of upper Međimurje and its geographical position.

Mađerka is a hill above Štrigova, towards the border with Slovenia, at 341 meters above sea level, and only three meters lower than the highest point of Međimurje. The advantage of Mađerka is that you can see as many as four countries - Slovenia, Hungary, Austria, and Slovakia, and in good weather, you can see Sljeme.

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Photo: Međimurje County

"With the desire to raise the entire tourist offer to an even higher level, to offer tourists top tourist content, the municipality of Štrigova in cooperation with Međimurje County has designed a project to build a lookout tower with the aim of being a visitor center, cycling resort and presentation/tasting center for the Međimurje Wine Road", said Međimurje County Prefect Matija Posavec.

After its completion, which will give Međimurje another tourist destination, the final works in the new Cycling Information Center and its equipment will follow. At the location, visitors will have access to information about the tourist offer of the whole of Međimurje, and cyclists will have at their disposal a rest area equipped with a service station, adapted to e-bikes.

The new Cycling Information Center with a lookout tower is one of the components of the CycleSeeing Attractour - CSA project, co-financed from the cross-border program, implemented by the Municipality of Štrigova in partnership with the Tourist Board of Štrigova and the City of Nagykanisza.

"As there were no open tenders from national funds at that time, we applied for the cross-border program Interreg Croatia Hungary, and the project was assessed as very high quality and received the approval for co-financing of 85% of the total project value of 7,395,000 kuna," Posavec added.

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Photo: Međimurje Bike

In order to attract as many tourists as possible, not only for short-term visits but also for longer stays, three tourist packages have been designed - a bicycle package, a health and wellness package, and an eco-tourist package. These packages will contribute to making the project area a more attractive tourist destination, not just a transit one. Tourists will get acquainted with the newly built attractions, but also with the existing cultural and natural heritage of the destination.

"The project is in the development phase and we expect it can be completed by May this year. Terme Sveti Martin is close to Štrigova and all this is important for further development of the overall tourist offer of Međimurje, since I believe that it will awake the great interest of domestic and foreign guests, and will further present the beauties of Međimurje and develop continental tourism.", explains Posavec.

The new Cycling Information Center with a lookout tower is located on Pušipel's bicycle route. It is a circular trail that connects Štrigovo with Čakovec and passes through the wine-growing area of ​​the county, so it is ideal for e-bikes.

Međimurje abounds in attractive and well-kept bicycle paths and is located at the crossroads of international bicycle routes. Recreational and fun cycling is ideal for family vacations, but also for socializing. Međimurje offers something for everyone, easier and more demanding sections, road and off-road routes, and there are also customized terrains for XTC and cross driving.

"We were the first in Croatia to introduce Cyclist Welcome Quality, a brand accepted by neighboring Varaždin and Zagreb counties, and applied in Hungary. Accommodation facilities are fundamental to the quality of the overall cycling offer of a destination and therefore their services are classified into five quality classes up to five gears", emphasizes the director of the Tourist Board of Međimurje County, Rudi Grula and adds that in Međimurje, in addition to groomed trails, there are a number of equally arranged rest areas, charging stations for e-bikes and other facilities that attract cyclists from all over Europe.

The emphasis, as he says, is on foreign guests, but also those from nearby destinations from which they can come to Međimurje by bicycle, and the e-bicycles, which are becoming more and more popular in Europe. For example, guests from Graz, which is 70 to 90 kilometers away, can cross the section by e-bike in one day, and then cycle around Međimurje, neighboring counties, or cross to Slovenia and Hungary. Namely, the desire is to make Međimurje a kind of base in which cyclists would spend several days and explore the whole area.

''Our plan is to connect the Goričan Border Crossing with a bicycle path along the Trnava River, with Čakovec, and then Varaždin. The bicycle path would avoid road crossings and move along the river bank.", Grula announced.

Cyclists aim not only to ride but also to rest, and such visitors are the target group of the tourist offer of Međimurje County. Ecological sustainability, reduction of carbon footprint, the offer of local producers... this is something that cyclists take special care of when choosing their holiday destination, and Međimurje is a region that can provide them with that.

If you want to learn more about everything Međimurje County has to offer on your next trip, be sure to check out Total Croatia's guide, Međimurje in a Page.

For more, check out our travel section.

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