Has Coffee Become More Expensive? An Update on PDV Increase in Split

By , 16 Feb 2017, 08:18 AM
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Has Coffee Become More Expensive? An Update on PDV Increase in Split Source: Pixabay

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The PDV increase for the hospitality industry has left many Split caterers in a dilemma. To increase prices or not?

Index.hr reports on February 16, 2016 that we can be assured (currently) that coffee is still set at reasonable prices, but just because many of the prices have yet to be raised does not mean that they will not eventually go up.

Cafe Fro on the Riva has said that “they are cheaper by a kuna”, and Bobis has the same prices as last year.

Zubak at the beginning of the Riva has said that prices their prices will not rise.

"We have not raised our prices and we will not raise them. A Coca Cola with us is 15 kuna, beers are around 15 kuna, half a liter of draft is 18, 10 kuna for a small drink," says Nikola Zubak. 

Zubak also does not understand how some cafes can have more expensive rates for foreign guests, and cheaper rates for local guests.

"Imagine how you would feel if you went to Madrid and were charged more for a drink just because you are a foreigner?” he adds.

He noted that some restaurants in the middle of the season offer a liter of house wine for 140 kuna, pizza for 80, and fish from fish farms for 400 to 500 kunas. Oh, the summer season in Dalmatia…

What about the cafes outside of the city center?

"We have not yet gone up so our old guests don’t complain, but we will announce an increase in the price of coffee," says Robi Ivic, head of Caffe Periska at hotel Corner.

Marko Bralic Keto, co-owner of clubs Tropic and Vanilla, is currently on break until the season. While they are undergoing remodeling and construction, Keto has yet to consider raising prices. 

"We have not thought about it yet, but if everyone else starts raising their prices, then we will too,” he added.

Cafe Krom recently raised their coffee prices one kuna. "From that kuna, the country is getting 90 lipa, and us 10.”

In addition to the charges, Split caterers are struggling to find quality staff.

"In the heart of the town every year, 30 new outlets of all kinds open, from kiosks to restaurants. And it will be the same this year. I do not know when it will stop. We are expected to struggle for the customer and do not even know how to have quality control. Quality is impossible to obtain for one cook but we also have the ships, islands, coasts, and more recently mountain facilities. Chefs are taking in Istrian caterers because they offer better conditions. And it is the same with waiters. In the season, chefs offer a salary of four thousand euros,” reveals one Split caterer.

"Whoever says that they will not raise prices is either lying or depriving you of quality. I am convinced that 90 percent of caterers will raise prices because 12 percent is not a small thing. In the summer we have a huge increase in supply, and prices are jumping like crazy. When everything is taken into account, a price increase is inevitable. We are trying to be realistic, but lunch will be more expensive by some 15 kunas, brunch about 10,” says Danijell Nikolla, owner of Corto Maltese which is currently being renovated but will reopen soon.

Nikolla also emphasized the problem of finding quality personnel.

"This is the most stressful part of the job. In the fourth, fifth month, it is like the diner is a bus stop. They come, remain two or three days and then leave after the islands offer them anything, and crazy salaries of 20, 30 thousand. Many caterers fall for the story, and then receive three times less pay,” added Nikolla.

Corto Maltese has otherwise uniform prices, during and out of season, for domestic and foreign guests.